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BARON VON STEUBEN'S

REVOLUTIONARY WAR

DRILL MANUAL

BARON VON STEUBEN'S

REVOLUTIONARY WAR

DRILL MANUAL

A FACSIMILE REPRINT OF THE

1794 EDITION

FREDERICK WILLIAM
BARON VON STEUBEN

DOVER PUBLICATIONS, INC.

New York

Copyright © 1985 by Dover Publications, Inc.

All rights reserved under Pan American and International Copy-
right Conventions.

This Dover edition, first published in 1985, is an unabridged
republication of Regulations for the Order and Discipline of the Troops of
the United States. To Which Is Added, An Appendix, Containing, the
United States Militia Act, Passed in Congress, May, 1792, published by
I[saiah) Thomas and E[benezer] T. Andrews, Boston, in 1794 (with
the title page showing the author's name as Baron de Stuben) as a
"new edition" of the regulations approved by Congress on March 29,
1779. For the Dover edition, a new Publisher's Note has been pre-
pared and foldout plates have been converted to single- or double-
page plates.

The publisher is grateful to The Corning Museum of Glass for
making the 1794 edition available for reproduction.

Manufactured in the United States of America
Dover Publications, Inc., 31 East 2nd Street, Mineola, N.Y. 11501

Library of Congress Cataloging in Publication Data
United States. War Dept. Inspector General's Office.

Baron von Steuben's Revolutionary War drill manual.

Reprint: Originally published: Regulations for the order and disci-
pline of the troops of the United States to which is added an appendix
containing the United States Militia Act, passed in Congress, May
1792. Boston : I. Thomas and E. T. Andrews, 1794.

1. Military law, United States. 2. United States. Army–Regula-
tions. 3. United States. Army. Infantry-Drill manuals. I. Steuben,
Friedrich Wilhelm Ludolf Gerhard Augustin, Baron von,
1730-1794. II. United States. Militia Act. III. Title. IV. Title: Revo-
lutionary War drill manual.
KF7305.A33 1985 343.73'01 85-10266
ISBN 0-486-24934-4 (pbk.) 347.3031

PUBLISHER'S NOTE

Baron von Steuben, who played a crucial role in the military success of the American Revolution, was born Friedrich Wilhelm Ludolf Gerhard Augustin von Steuben on September 17, 1730, in Magdeburg, Prussia, to a military family. In America he was known as Frederick William Augustus von (or de) Steuben.

Entering the officer corps of the Prussian army at the age of sixteen, Steuben served until the end of the Seven Years' War (1756-63), rising to the rank of captain. For a time he was attached to the general staff of Frederick the Great. Leaving the army shortly after the Peace of Hubertusburg in 1763, Steuben at some unrecorded date during the next twelve years appears to have been created a baron (Freiherr), while acting as court chamberlain to the Prince of HohenzollernHechingen. Yet he left Hohenzollern-Hechingen under obscure circumstances, and deeply in debt, in 1775 to seek posts with the British East India Company and the French and Prussian armies. All of these efforts came to nothing. At last, in the summer of 1777 he was brought to the attention of Benjamin Franklin, then in Paris as an agent of the embattled British colonies. By letter, Franklin presented him to George Washington as "a Lieutenant General in the King of Prussia's service,” a vastly imposing, if fictitious, rank that greatly impressed both Washington and the Continental Congress—as did Steuben's offer to accept only his expenses as payment until the Revolutionary cause succeeded. He was directed to report to General Wash

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