Environmental Impact Assessment: Practical Solutions to Recurrent Problems

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John Wiley & Sons, Nov 24, 2003 - Technology & Engineering - 576 pages
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This book challenges the prevailing assumption that Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) should be structured around a unitary EIA process. The book begins by identifying, through a scenario, eight recurrent problems in EIA practice. The characteristics of multiple variations of conventional EIA processes, at both the regulatory and applied levels, are then presented. The residual problems that remain after the conventional processes are described and assessed providing the springboard for a description and analysis of eight alternative EIA processes.
 

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the book is crucial especially because it deals on new noble ideas

Contents

1 INTRODUCTION
1
2 CONVENTIONAL EIA PROCESSES
23
3 HOW TO MAKE EIAs MORE RIGOROUS
89
4 HOW TO MAKE EIAs MORE RATIONAL
127
5 HOW TO MAKE EIAs MORE SUBSTANTIVE
159
6 HOW TO MAKE EIAs MORE PRACTICAL
209
7 HOW TO MAKE EIAs MORE DEMOCRATIC
266
8 HOW TO MAKE EIAs MORE COLLABORATIVE
316
9 HOW TO MAKE EIAs MORE ETHICAL
389
10 HOW TO MAKE EIAs MORE ADAPTIVE
419
11 HOW TO CONNECT AND COMBINE EIA PROCESSES
488
REFERENCES
517
INDEX
549
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Page 543 - Incorporating Biodiversity Considerations into Environmental Impact Analysis under the National Environmental Policy Act.
Page 522 - Public Involvement and Dispute Resolution: A Reader on the Second Decade of Experience at the Institute for Water Resources, Institute for Water Resources, US Army Corps of Engineers, Alexandria, Virginia, 1999.
Page 542 - United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE) Convention on Access to Information, Public Participation in Decision-Making, and Access to Justice in Environmental Matters...

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About the author (2003)

DAVID P. LAWRENCE, PhD, has been an EIA practitioner for more than twenty-five years and is currently President of Lawrence Environmental. He is also a member of the Planning Institute of British Columbia, the International Association for Impact Assessment, and the National Association of Environmental Professionals.

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