History of Chocolate in York

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Grub Street Publishers, 2012 M08 24 - 224 pages
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A deliciously illustrated historical tour of England’s “chocolate city.”
 
In the nineteenth century, York was renowned for confectionery—particularly chocolate. Treats like Kit Kat, Fruit Gums, All Gold, and Butterkist were made by York companies Rowntree’s, Terry’s, and M.A. Craven and Son. This new book is the first to chart the history of chocolate and confectionery manufacture and marketing by York companies, from their origins in the eighteenth century through to recent takeovers by Nestle, Tangerine, and Kraft.
 
Revolutionary new products such as Easter eggs in the 1870s and chocolate assortments in the 1890s are covered—along with such crucial turn-of-the-century developments as milk chocolate and the chocolate bar. The significance to the industry of the Quaker movement is discussed, along with an examination of the impact of the world wars and the intervening depression.
 
Fully illustrated throughout, this book provides both an enlightening view of the chocolate industry—from production, quality control, distribution, and marketing to packaging, design, and branding—as well a tasty morsel of British history.
 

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Contents

Acknowledgements
Fry of Bristol
Other Early Chocolate Manufacturers in Britain
York in the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries
Cocoa Works Magazine
19011914
Chocolate in the First World
Chocolate in the Second World
Caley of Norwich
19701999
17671890
Terry in the Second World
A Craven and Son
The Confectionery Industry in TwentyFirst Century York
A Chronology of Chocolate
Copyright

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About the author (2012)

Paul Chrystal is the author of books on chocolate, the Quakers, York's place in education and culture and on other towns in and near North Yorkshire. He is the owner of the Knaresborough Bookshop and lives not far from York.

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