Raj: The Making and Unmaking of British India

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Little, Brown, 1997 - 722 pages
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This is the brilliantly told story of one of the wonders of the modern world - how in less than a hundred years the British made themselves masters of India. They ruled it for another hundred, departing in 1947, leaving behind the independent states of India and Pakistan. British rule taught Indians to see themselves as Indians and its benefits included railways, hospitals, law and a universal language. But the Raj, outwardly so monolithic and magnificent, was always precarious. Its masters knew that it rested ultimately on the goodwill of Indians. This is a new look at a subject rich in incident and character; the India of the Raj was that of Clive, Kipling, Curzon and Gandhi and a host of lesser known others. RAJ will provoke debate, for it sheds new light on Mountbatten and the events of 1946-47 which ended an exercise in benign autocracy and an experiment in altruism.

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User Review  - Amanda Christine - Goodreads

wonderful ! Read full review

Review: Raj: The Making and Unmaking of British India

User Review  - Maryanne Khan - Goodreads

A most most comprehensive and thoroughly (MOST thoroughly!) documented account of "how millions of Indians collaborated with their new rulers and made possible the government of so many by so few ... Read full review

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About the author (1997)

Lawrence James was born in Bath and was educated at the University of York and Merton College, Oxford. After a distinguished teaching career he has emerged as one of the outstanding narrative historians of his generation.

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