Woman, Man, Bangkok: Love, Sex, and Popular Culture in Thailand

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Rowman & Littlefield, 2002 - Psychology - 273 pages
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During the early decades of the twentieth century, Thailand's capital, Bangkok, took on an increasingly cosmopolitan character-a development fueled both by global economic forces and a local revolution in communications. The 1920s were a particularly dynamic period of social and cultural transformation that had a profound impact on the development of Thai modernity. This book examines the growth of a polyphonous and often vociferous Thai public, a public that used a range of new media outlets to express themselves and clamor for a more just and equitable social order. Scot BarmZ mines a rich lode of previously ignored cultural ephemera found in popular newspapers, magazines, novels, short stories, film booklets, and cartoons to create a vibrant cultural history of early modern Thailand that moves beyond conventional, elite-based historical studies of the period. By focusing on such controversies and conflicts as the status of women, relations between the sexes, class antagonisms, and the growth of a commercial mass culture, this book offers a new interpretation of the key decade of the 1920s and its significance for contemporary Thailand.
 

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Contents

II
1
III
17
IV
43
V
69
VI
97
VII
133
VIII
157
IX
179
X
195
XI
217
XII
253
XIII
259
XIV
269
XV
273
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About the author (2002)

Scot BarmZ is visiting fellow in the Division of Pacific and Asian History, Research School of Pacific and Asian Studies, at The Australian National University.