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R. O. NEUMANN, DR. Phil. and MED.

Assistant in the Hygienic Institute in Würzburg

AUTHORIZED TRANSLATION FROM THE SECOND

ENLARGED AND REVISED GERMAN EDITION

EDITED BY

GEORGE H. WEAVER, M.D.
Assistant Professor of Pathology, Rush Medical College, Chicago

PART II_TEXT

PHILADELPHIA AND LONDON

W. B. SAUNDERS & COMPANY

cmur

COPYRIGHT, 1901, by W. B. SAUNDERS & COMPANY

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The scope and purpose of this work are sufficiently stated in the authors' preface. The need of such a work has often been felt in directing the work of advanced students especially, and it is with the hope of aiding them that it has been undertaken to place the contents of this work within their easy reach. Because of numerous mistakes in the references in the original, all of those which refer to Plates in the atlas have been verified or corrected, and also as many of those which refer to the literature as were accessible. A few references to original articles in English have been inserted.

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FROM THE PREFACE TO THE FIRST EDITION.

Doubt, honestly arrived at and acknowledged, is better than apparent certainty without a statement of those things upon which it depends.

For years my brother, J. F. Lehmann, the publisher in Munich, has requested me to furnish him for his “Medical Atlases” one which would simplify bacteriologic diagnosis. After I had long refused to undertake the vast labor which this would necessitate, a fortunate circumstance in the summer of 1894 led me to accept the plan. I discovered in Dr. R. Neumann, who was working in bacteriology in my institute, so excellent a talent for drawing and painting that I proposed to him that he undertake the work with me. Whether we have solved the problem remains for the critics to decide.

It seems to me that the plates, painted by Dr. Neumann with untiring zeal under my continual supervision, and carefully reproduced by the lithographer Fr. Reichhold in Munich, are a useful addition to our means of teaching. With few exceptions, the reproduction leaves little to be desired. At least, we have had the satisfaction of finding the pictures of great advantage in our own work and in that of numerous gentlemen working in our institute. We carried out many investigations regarding the method of illustrating before selecting the one employed, which may be considered as almost entirely satisfactory.

At the present time, when, properly, photography is so much used for the objective representation of objects in the natural sciences, especially those of bacteriology, many will

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