Cuba and Her People of To-day: An Account of the History and Progress of the Island Previous to Its Independence; a Description of Its Physical Features; a Study of Its People; And, in Particular, an Examination of Its Present Political Conditions, Its Industries, Natural Resources, and Prospects; Together with Information and Suggestions Designed to Aid the Prospective Investor Or Settler

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Page 290 - President of the United States of America, have caused the said Convention to be made public, to the end that the same and every article and...
Page 301 - ... maintain the independence of Cuba, and to protect the people thereof, as well as for its own defense, the government of Cuba will sell or lease to the United States lands necessary for coaling or naval stations at certain specified points to be agreed upon with the President of the United States. "VIII. That by way of further assurance the government of Cuba will embody the foregoing provisions in a permanent treaty with the United States.
Page 300 - That to enable the United States to maintain the independence of Cuba, and to protect the people thereof, as well as for its own defense, the government of Cuba will sell or lease to the United States lands necessary for coaling or naval stations at certain specified points to be agreed upon with the President of the United States.
Page 305 - And whereas the said Convention has been duly ratified on both parts, and the ratifications of the two governments were exchanged in the City of Washington, on the...
Page 305 - In testimony whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed. Done...
Page 304 - That the government of Cuba will execute, and as far as necessary extend, the plans already devised or other plans to be mutually agreed upon, for the; sanitation of the cities of the island...
Page 291 - Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That whenever the President of the United States...
Page 292 - Cuba, and so long as the said convention shall remain in force, all articles of merchandise being the product of the soil or industry of the Republic of Cuba, which are now imported into the United States free of duty, shall continue to be so admitted...
Page 286 - It is agreed that similar articles of both countries shall receive equal treatment on their importation into the ports of the United States and of the Republic of Cuba, respectively.
Page 299 - That the government of Cuba consents that the United States may exercise the right to intervene for the preservation of Cuban independence, the maintenance of a government adequate for the protection of life, property, and...

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