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NEW BOY WONDER

A BOY chess "phenom" is astonishing **■ the veteran players of Philadelphia. E. M. Edwards, the new wonder, is a thirteen-year-old schoolboy. He can be seen almost every day playing- the cracks of the Mercantile Literary Chess Club, and compelling many of the best players of that ancient organization to admit defeat. Recently Edwards played a simultaneous game against six opponents at the Norristown Chess Club. He played, in all, eleven games, winning six, losing one and drawing four. Young Edwards has tried his skill unsuccessfully against Dr. Laskar, the world's champion. He recently played a game with Capablanca, the Cuban prodigy, and lost by a narrow margin. With years he should develop into one of the famous chess players of the world.

Kkptilf. A Victim Of Rabbit Trap.

SNAKE CAUGHT IN TRAP

IT is seldom indeed that the wily snake is caught in such a homely contrivance as a wire rabbit trap, but this fine specimen of a grass snake was recently caught in a Suffolk—England—field. It is interesting to notice too how completely his body has been enfolded in the trap, in fact his body is bent and caught twice between the teeth of the wires.

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A Hobo Of The Dark Continent.

AFRICAN "WEARY WILLY"

A FRICA has her tramp problem just as we have and the eccentric costume worn by this "son of rest" in Basutoland is one of the picturesque features of the village of Mesari. As he absolutely refuses to work the villagers feed him and clothe him in the strange assortment of rags and tatters shown in the photograph.

THE HAMMER-HEAD

/^\NE of the oddest catches on record in southern California is the weird looking sea monster shown herewith, a variety of shark known as the hammerhead. It will be seen that its head is really shaped like a mallet with one eye at each end, a broad, shovel-like snout and under it a formidable array of teeth. This is one of the fiercest members of the shark family, and its large size makes it a pretty ugly customer to handle, as it often attains to the length of twelve feet or so. This one was caught in Long Beach after a desperate struggle with the angler, who is—and quite properly— very proud of his catch.

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BANISHING THE WHEEL-
BARROW

A N invention which seems to do away **■ with the wheelbarrow, at least as far as the laying of brick pavement is concerned, is shown in the illustration. The device, which is known as a roller brick carrier, looks like a long steel ladder laid in an inclined position from the sidewalk to a point near the center of the street. What appears to be the rungs of the ladder are really steel rollers set very closely together and running on ball bearings, upon which the bricks are laid and allowed to run down to the street by gravity. To keep the bricks from running off the sides, the rollers are made with flanges at the ends. Among other advantageous features, the carrier delivers the bricks to the exact point where they are to be used, saving the two handlings which are required when the material is delivered with the wheelbarrow. Such an invention as this makes for speed, profit, and efficiency.

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A KEYLESS LOCK

A KEYLESS lock, recently placed upon ^* the market, resembles in appearance almost any other door lock in a general way, having a handsome door plate and knob, but at the right side and a little below the knob is a series of four small levers. These operate in various combinations known only to those who are permitted free access to the house, and can be changed to a different combination when necessity demands. The lock can be adjusted so that it will lock on closing or by turning the small button underneath the knob. It is opened by pulling upward one or more times on one or more of the levers at the side. So simple is its operation that a child too small to unlock a door by means of a key can readily gain admittance with the keyless lock. This keyless mechanism can be attached to any standard lock so that the purchase of an entire new lock is not

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