Page images
PDF
EPUB
[merged small][graphic]
[graphic]

WHIRLS OF ELECTRIC LIGHT.

WHIRLS OF LIGHT MR. GEORGE W. PATTERSON has

V devised a means of swinging electrically-lighted clubs in such a way as to produce startling yet beautiful effects. He hit upon the idea entirely by accident. At one of his gymnastic performances the lights suddenly went out, and the electrician declared that he was helpless.

Mr. Patterson happened to have in his dressing room a number of electric torches. He attached them to the clubs, lighted them, and swung them round until the electrician had got his wires working again. Apart from saving the situation, the lighted clubs were very popular, and he determined to see whether it would not be possible to fix electric lights to the clubs.

The first thing was to design a special club. The ones now in use are made in two parts, the split being lengthwise. A flexible cable of five wires leads into the club handles through a rubber tube, the wiring of course being concealed. Three series of eight three candle-power miniature lamps are set in small, speciallyturned brass sockets the length of the club, so the lamps stand out at right angles to its surface. As the little globes are colored, there are no fewer than six series of different colored lights when the current is turned on. But these clubs could only be used in halls or houses wired for electrical illumination. To overcome this difficulty Mr. Patterson carries a battery about with him.

IN HONOR OF HENRY CHADWICK. "FATHER OF

BASEBALL.'

[graphic]
[graphic]

TRACKLESS TROLLEY IN THE CALIFORNIA MOUNTAINS.

mountain brook on
the other. The
average grade is
about eight per
cent, and the maxi-
mum grade is
twelve per cent.

This is a regular
trackless line in
California. This
highway is also
largely used by

automobiles and surface cleverly imitated. Fastened to

other vehicles and the sides of the shaft are bronze decora

experience shows tions in the form of bronze crossed bats,

that the trackless a catcher's mitt and mask, and a tablet

trolley cars are bearing the inscription. The monument

able to turn out for was erected by private contributions

any passing vehicle from admirers of the game and the man.

or any obstruction,

and still have a TRACKLESS TROLLEY IN THE safe clearance. MOUNTAINS

During the early

part of the operaTHIS electric trackless trolley is travel- tion of this system

ing over a winding path cut out of it was necessary to the side of the mountain to an average operate over a portion of road which was width of twenty-five feet. It has a high being plowed up. This made it necessary bank on one side of the road and a to drive the cars across deep furrows.

THE PHOTOGRAPHER AT
WORK-WITH RE-

SULT BELOW,

[graphic]

NEW YORK UPSIDE DOWN.
George Nealy, 700 feet up, on flag staff of Singer Building. took this remarkable photo.

[graphic]

NEW RAPID FIRE GUN RECENTLY TRIED OUT IN THE ARMY.

It shoots 600 shots of .30 caliber, per minute.

UNKNOWN HOBGOBLINS gives them the appearance of wear

ing spectacles. They have four wings. SOME of nature's most grotesque little Some are clumsy in fight, and use

individuals have just made their bow their wings mostly as a parachute. to the public. These midgets of remark. The hind pair of legs is longer than the able shape are known as “tree-hoppers.” front ones, and is employed in leaping They have just been portrayed in a num and jumping to considerable distances, ber of large wax models at the Museum which has given to these insects their of Natural History, New York, executed common name of "tree-hoppers.” They by Mr. Ignac Matausch, of the Depart- are especially interesting on account of ment of Invertebrate Zoology. These the peculiar development of the thorax, droll hobgoblin-like insects are of special which, in grown specimens, is provided interest, for nothing of this character on with singular horns or protuberances. so large a scale has hitherto been at These horns are often so freakish and tempted in entomological work.

extravagantly shaped that entomologists The "tree-hon- have hitherto been unable to account for pers” have sucking their development and form. They remouthpieces and mind one of some of the highly speciallive on the juice or ized horns and tusks of fossil reptiles sap of small trees and mammals. It is difficult to conceive and plants, which of their being used by the insect in any they extract from way. This peculiar development is not the stems by means so clearly seen in tree-hoppers of temof their sharp perate regions as in the species from beaks, consisting South and Central America, where they of several bristles are often most surprisingly shaped.

encloserl in a fleshy Many have mountain-like humps on their A HUMP BACKED CHROAN

joined sheath. The backs; the prothorax is prolonged back-
tropical types are
gorgeously colored
in many hues.
They have four
eyes — two large
and protruding
ones, and two be-
low, partly devel-
oped. Their two
large eyes have a
keen, droll look,
and the line that "CAPTAIN" GEORGE STREETER's Auto House TOAT.
separates the head. Claiming part of the lake front of Chicago as his property.
in some instances,

[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]

"HOBGORLIN."

A HARMLESS "MONSTER"

FROM BRAZIL.

for a long time "Captain" Streeter, besieged in his

auto. defied the authorities, but finally yielded.

[graphic]

ward, like a roof, over the body, often quite covering the entire insect. In some instances, the prothorax is an elevated nightcap, in others it is shaped like a Tam O'Shanter; and sometimes it has long horns, one on each side. Some possess a wonderful sword or blade-like appendage, having ball-like projections, which are oftentimes several long hairs. The little tree-hoppers are practically harmless and are not usually found in sufficiently large numbers to constitute a pest. Nearly all the best and most curious specimens are obtained from various tropical parts of South and Central America, and India. The construction of the wax models requires most patient and delicate modeling and painting, in order to bring out the hundreds of indentures, cavities, and lines.

HENRY BARRINGTON, AN ENGLISHMAN. PLAYING POPU.

LAR MELODIES WITH HIS EYES COVERED.

NEW STYLE OF DUMP CAR THE style of dump car which has 1 found favor with Uncle Sam in the excavation of the Panama Canal is shown in the accompanying illustrations. A large number of these cars are being used in work upon that project.

The dumping of the cars is controlled by compressed air from the engine, the cars being equipped with an extra set of pipes and connecting hose, which extends to a special valve in the engine cab. With air from the same supply used for brakes, the mechanism of the cars is worked, and is under such perfect control that the entire train may be dumped at the same time, or one car at a time, part of the load on one side and part on the other, as the work may require.

By another movement of the valve in the engine cab the cars are restored to normal position and are ready to receive another load.

[graphic][merged small]
[graphic]
[graphic][merged small]

THE CAR AS IT APPEARS WHEN DUMPING ITS LOAD.

SAILING SHIP “ COMES BACK" W HILE the eyes of the world have

W been focused on the progress in shipbuilding in the steamer class there has been prepared for sea, almost unnoticed, a wooden vessel that far surpasses in capacity any ship of its class that ever put to sea. It is a six masted schooner named the Wyoming. The gross register of this great sailing craft is 3,730 tons or twenty-two tons more than the steel hull six masted schooner William L. Douglas of Boston.

American ambition refused to stop short at six masts. It was thought that one more could be added and the experiment was made with the Thomas W. Lawson, a photograph of the model of which ill fated monster is shown on this page. It is still argued that the seven master could be made to stay afloat, the Lawson having been built too narrow and too light below the water line for the safety of the ship. As the Lawson turned turtle ship builders who predict a great future for the sailing ship are content to leave a seven masted schooner out of their calculations. It is also asserted that the six masted schooner is a more profitable sailing craft than a seven master could possible be, so that the factor of commercial gain will probably settle the limit at six masts.

[graphic]
[graphic]
[merged small][graphic]
[graphic]

Sıx MASTED MODEL OF Wyoming. This seems to be the limit of size compatible with safety.

THE LATEST IN FRENCH FASHIONS. Handbag for those who may care to travel in a

dirigible balloon.

HALF-TON FLORAL CORNUCOPIA, This was displayed in a West End London church

during a festival,

MODEL OF THE ILL-FATED SEVEN MASTER,

Thomas Lawson,

« PreviousContinue »