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JOHN A. LESTER, PH.D.
Instructor in English, The Hill School, Pottstown, Pa.

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HOUGHTON MIFFLIN COMPANY
BOSTON NEW YORK CHICAGO SAN FRANCISCO

The Riverside Press Cambridge

PUBLICATIONS OF THE
Roosevelt Memorial Association, Inc.

1. ROOSEVELT IN THE BAD LANDS. By

Hermann Hagedorn, author of “ The Boys' Life
of Theodore Roosevelt" and Director of the

Roosevelt Memorial Association.
II. ROOSEVELT IN THE KANSAS CITY

STAR. Editorials by Theodore Roosevelt.
With an Introduction by Ralph E. Stout,

Managing Editor, Kansas City Star.
III. THE AMERICANISM OF THEODORE

ROOSEVELT. Selections from his Writings
and Speeches. Compiled by Hermann Hage-
dorn. Edited for school use by John A. Lester,
Ph.D., Instructor in English, The Hill School,
Pottstown, Pennsylvania.

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INTRODUCTION

This book is intended to serve a double purpose - to provide a selection of striking passages from Theodore Roosevelt's writings, and to serve as an interpretation of his mental processes, of his moral, social, and political philosophy and of the life in which that philosophy expressed itself. The book is a unit; and, unless the compiler is altogether deceiving himself, the reader will find in the material contained in it a logical progression from the first page to the last.

The selections, the reader will note, are divided into three major parts. In the first will be found stories from Mr. Roosevelt's historical writings which reveal in vivid flashes the background of his mind. To understand fully the significance of his doctrine, it is important to realize with what ardor Mr. Roosevelt dwelt on heroic actions. In his mind, the memory of the Nation's inspiring past hung like a glowing tapestry — the "back-drop" of the scene in which dream and thought and will fought out the tremendous drama of his life. No one can understand Roosevelt's approach to the problems of personal and national life who does not take into account how firmly his feet were planted on certain elementary conceptions of heroic virtue. It was not at all that he wished to turn back the hands of the clock, and, rejecting modern progress, return to the simpler customs of the fathers; but that, accepting the age of electricity, he wished to see it made sound and

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