Annual Report

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Page 16 - The western half of the United States would sustain a population greater than that of our whole country to-day if the waters that now run to waste were saved and used for irrigation. The forest and water problems are perhaps the most vital internal questions of the United States.
Page 178 - Hard laundry soap shaved fine, % pound. Water, 1 gallon. Kerosene, 2 gallons. Dissolve the soap in boiling water, remove from the stove, and immediately add the kerosene ; churn with a bucket pump until a soft, butter-like, clabbered mass is obtained. One part of this stock solution is added to ten or twelve of water for spraying.
Page 255 - Notes Explanatory of a Map and Section Illustrating the Geological Structure of the Country Bordering on the Missouri River, from the Mouth of the Platte River to Fort Benton.
Page 255 - Explanations of a Second Edition of a Geological Map of Nebraska and Kansas, based upon Information obtained in an Expedition to the Black Hills, under the Command of Lieut. GK Warren.
Page 363 - ... grow. Fortunately, the best trees for planting are easily obtained, because they are usually those common in the locality. Hardy Trees. — The first rule to lay down is to plant only the kinds that are known to be hardy. A school-ground plantation is no place for experiment. Naturally the trees will have to endure greater hardships than those of a private plantation ; they will be likely to have less cultivation and be subject to more abuse. No matter how strict the rules, the soil about them...
Page 366 - ... to Plant the Trees Preparation of 'the Soil. Thorough preparation of the soil should precede the planting. Where blocks or belts are to be formed, the ground should be plowed and prepared as for a garden crop. Clay soils are best plowed the previous fall, in order that the ground may weather over winter. On such soil subsoiling is beneficial, and should precede the planting by at least one season. Just before planting time the ground should be pulverized with a roller or harrow. If the planting...
Page 200 - The practical outcome of the results of our experiments may be summed up as follows: Horses may be watered before, during or after meals without interfering with the digestion and absorption of food. All these methods of watering are equally good for the horse and each of them may be employed, according to circumstances. It is obvious that certain circumstances may make it necessary to adopt one or other method. I need only mention as an example that after severe loss of water, such as occurs in...
Page 367 - ... feet. Why Trees Die in Transplanting. — To many persons it is a mystery why trees die after being transplanted. They do not die without cause, however, and when one begins to wither something is wrong. Oftentimes the result is not to be noticed until weeks after the injury; in other cases it is apparent in a few days.
Page 16 - The wise administration of the forest reserves will be not less helpful to the interests which depend on water than to those which depend on wood and grass. The water supply itself depends upon the forest. In the arid region it is water, not land, which measures production. The western half of the United States would sustain a population greater than that of our whole country to-day if the waters that now run to waste were...
Page 357 - ... Arbor Day. — The governor of each State annually appoints Arbor Day at the proper season for planting. This day is celebrated in the schools by public exercises appropriate to tree planting, with essays, songs, and recitations by the pupils, and addresses by visitors. In connection with the exercises there is ordinarily more or less tree planting., Great care is taken to make the planting ceremonies impressive by letting the children take part, and by planting trees commemorative of noted persons...

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