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CHAPTER XI.

THE PRESIDENTIAL NOMINATION.

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HE several candidates were placed in nomination by their respective States and the speeches were of a high order. The name of Hon. Richard Parks Bland, of Missouri, was presented by Senator Vest, of that State, and the nomination was seconded by Hon. David Overmyer, of Kansas, Hon. J. R. Williams, of Illinois, Hon. Paul Jones, of Arkansas, Hon. J. W. Bailey, of Texas, and Hon. J. L. Rawlins, of Utah.

Senator Turpie, of Indiana, placed before the convention the name of Governor Claude Matthews, of that State, and his nomination was seconded by Hon. Oscar Tripet, of California.

Ex-Congressman Fred White, of Iowa, presented the claims of ex-Governor Horace Boies, of that State, and the nomination was seconded by Hon. T. A. Smith, of Minnesota.

The name of Senator J. C. S. Blackburn, of Kentucky, was presented by Ion. John S. Rhea, of that State, and speeches were made by Hon. W. W. Foote, of California, Hon. James Malone, of Wisconsin, and Hon. J. W. St. Clair, of Virginia, in support of the nomination.

Col. A. W. Patrick, of Ohio, presented the name of Hon. John R. McLean, of that State, and the nomination was seconded by Hon. Robert E. Mattingly, of the District of Columbia.

Hon. W. W. Foote of California stated that California desired to nominate Senator Stephen H. White of that State, but that Mr. White declined to allow his name to be presented.

Hon. W. A. Jones of Virginia announced that the Democrats of his State in convention assembled had requested the delegation to present the name of Hon. John W. Daniel, but that in compliance with his request, the delegation refrained from doing so.

Hon. John W. Corcoran, of Massachusetts, stated that the Democrats of his State had, by unanimous vote, instructed the delegation to support ex-Governor William E. Russell, but that because of the platform adopted, he had asked that his name be not presented. Hon. William F. Harrity, of Pennsylvania, stated that in obedience to the instructions of the Democratic Convention of that State, the Pennsylvania delegation presented the name of Hon. Robert E. Pattison.

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Hon. M. A. Miller, of Oregon, on behalf of his delegation, presented the name of Hon. Sylvester Pennoyer of that State.

I left the convention hall at the close of the afternoon session and did not return. It was arranged that the delegation from Nebraska should make no formal nomination. I remained in my room at the hotel and there received the bulletins from the convention hall. Knowing the intentions of the Nebraska delegation, and not knowing that any speeches were to be made by others, I was surprised when the bulletins announced that Hon. Henry T. Lewis of Georgia, had been recognized to present my name. He said:

Mr. Lewis' Speech.

Mr. President and Gentlemen of the Convention: I do not intend to make a speech, but simply, in behalf of the delegation on this floor from the State of Georgia, to place in nomination as the Democratic candidate for the Presidency of the United States a distinguished citizen, whose very name is an earnest of success, whose political record will insure Democratic victory, and whose life and character are loved and honored by the American people.

Should public office be bestowed as a reward for public service? Then no man more than he merits this reward. Is public office a public trust? Then in no other hands can be more safely lodged this greatest trust in the gift of a great people. Was public office created for the welfare of the people and the prosperity of the country? Then under his leadership in the coming campaign may we confidently hope to achieve these great ends in human government. In the political storms that have hitherto swept over this country he has stood on the field of battle among the leaders of the Democratic hosts like Saul among the Israelites, head and shoulders above all the rest. As Mr. Prentiss said of the immortal Clay, so we can truthfully say of him, that "His civic laurels will not yield in splendor to the brightest chaplet that ever bloomed upon a warrior's brow."

He needs no speech to introduce him to this convention. He needs no encomium to commend him to the people of the United States. Honor him, fellow Democrats, and you will honor yourselves. Nominate him and you will reflect credit upon the party you represent. Place in his hands the Democratic standard and you will have a leader worthy of your cause, and will win for yourselves the plaudits of your constituents and the blessings of posterity. I refer, fellow citizens, to the Honorable William J. Bryan, of the State of Nebraska.

The nomination was seconded by Hon. Theo. F. Kluttz or North Carolina, Hon. George Fred Williams of Massachusetts, Hon. Thomas J. Kernan of Louisiana, and Hon. E. J. Dockery of Wisconsin.

When Nebraska was called, Hon. C. J. Smyth, chairman of the delegation, announced that the State passed for the present, but that at the proper time the vote would be cast for me.

The nomination was made upon the fifth ballot on Friday, the 10th. The vote of the States upon the several ballots was as follows:

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