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During the fifth ballot Hon. Ollie James, of Kentucky, withdrew the name of Mr. Blackburn; Hon. John R. McLean announced the withdrawal of his name; Governor Stone, of Missouri, withdrew the name of Mr. Bland; Hon. A. Van Wagenen, of Iowa, withdrew the name of Mr. Boies, and Senator Turpie withdrew the name of Governor Matthews.

On motion of Senator Turpie the nomination was made unanimous. Some of the newspapers have commented upon the fact that the nomination went to one whose seat in the convention was contested. As a matter of fact, while the right of our delegation to seats in the convention was contested, there was never any reason for the contest. Our title to seats was as unquestionable as that of any delegation in the convention. I have, in previous chapters, described the contest as it developed in Nebraska. The bolting delegation, which was seated by the National Committee, was sent by an organization which found. its origin in a convention precisely like the convention which assembled at Indianapolis in September, 1896.

Our delegation established headquarters at the Clifton House, just across the street from the Palmer House, where something like a hundred Nebraska Democrats gathered daily, ready at all times to defend the principles set forth in the Chicago platform.

I may add for the encouragement of those who still believe that money is not necessary to secure a Presidential nomination that my entire expenses while in attendance upon the convention were less than $100.

It gives me pleasure to testify to the fact that those who were prominent in the contest for the Presidential nomination gave loyal and enthusiastic support to the ticket. Mr. Bland, whose vote was next to my own, devoted himself to the cause with voice and pen. Mr. Blackburn visited all parts of the Union and responded to every call. Mr. Boies did effective work upon the stump during the entire campaign. Mr. McLean, as a member of the Executive Committee of the National Committee, was an invaluable counselor and gave most efficient aid. Mr. Matthews was actively at work from the adjournment of the convention to the closing of the polls. Mr. Pattison, while not in accord with some parts of the platform, still supported the ticket. Mr. Tillman, who, while his name was not placed in nomination, received the vote of his State on the first ballot, delivered a large number of speeches in support of the platform and ticket. Vice-President Stevenson, who, though not formally a candidate, received several votes in the conven

tion, promptly placed himself at the disposal of the National Committee and spoke in several States. Mr. Sibley, who, notwithstanding his refusal to be a candidate, received a large vote for the Vice-Presidency, was a zealous supporter and untiring in his efforts in behalf of the ticket.

CHAPTER XII.

MR. SEWALL'S NOMINATION.

HEN the convention met on Saturday morning it proceeded to the nomination of a candidate for the Vice-Presidency. Hon. T. J. O'Sullivan, of Massachusetts, presented the name of ex-Congressman George Fred Williams.

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Hon. W. B. Marston, of Louisiana, brought forward the name of Hon. John R. McLean, of Ohio. The nomination was seconded by Hon. Ulric Sloan, of Ohio.

Hon. J. H. Currie, of North Carolina, presented the name of Judge Walter Clark, of that State.

Hon. Thomas Maloney, of Washington, presented the name of Hon. James Hamilton Lewis, of that State.

Hon. George W. Fithian, of Illinois, was placed in nomination by Hon. Tom Johnson, of Ohio.

Hon. M. A. Miller, of Oregon, presented the name of ex-Governor Sylvester Pennoyer, of that State.

Hon. Arthur Sewall, of Maine, was placed in nomination by Hon. William R. Burk, of California. The nominating speech was as follows:

Mr. Chairman and Ladies and Gentlemen of the Convention: What I say to you at this juncture I know in one respect will commend itself to you. I shall be brief. Gentlemen, taking into account the great mission which has called us into convention, it seems to me that we should consider matters far beyond the reach of this great body. We should consider that there are people whom we represent who have to vote on this great question, and those people represent forty-seven of the great Northern States, starting from Maine, reaching to the Pacific, touching the Atlantic coast on the south and extending far beyond into the State of Texas. Therefore, Mr. Chairman, as I have said, geographical consideration should prompt us, as well as the question of ability.

It would not become me to say aught of any gentleman whose name has been brought before you in this connection. I would not say aught of the gentleman from North Carolina or from Oregon or from any of the great Western States, but it seems to me that when we come to make up the remaining portion of this ticket we should consider those States beyond the Blue Ridge mountains, and in that connection I present a candidate who represents

every element which is presented to you in your platform and in your distinguished candidate for the President, William J. Bryan. I take pleasure in presenting for your careful consideration the name of Arthur Sewall, of Maine. Mr. President, it may be well said of him, in connection with the great questions involved in this matter and the interests which are before you, that he will fulfill the pledges which have been made by your platform at this time. You will make no mistake in nominating him.

The nomination was seconded by Hon. C. S. Thomas, of Colorado, and Hon. John Scott, of Maine.

Hon. Joseph C. Sibley, of Pennsylvania, was placed in nomination by Hon. J. D. Shewalter, of Missouri. The nomination was seconded by Hon. Free P. Morris, of Illinois, and by Hon. George W. Fithian of the same State, who at the same time announced that he himself was not a candidate.

Governor C. A. Culbertson, of Texas, on behalf of the delegates from his State, placed before the convention the name of Hon. Richard P. Bland, of Missouri.

Judge O. W. Powers, of Utah, presented the name of Senator J. W. Daniels, of Virginia. When Mr. Powers had finished, Hon. W. A. Jones, of Virginia, announced that while the delegates from that State appreciated the beautiful tribute which had been paid to Senator Daniel, he would not permit the use of his name in connection with that office.

Mr. Sewall was nominated on the fifth ballot. I give the vote on the several ballots:

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