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Registered at the New-York Postoffice as Second-class Matter.

LIBRARY OF TRIBUNE EXTRAS.

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25 Cents a Copy; $2.00 a Year.

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ECLIPSES.

During the year 1892 there will be our eclipses, two of the Sun and two of

the Moon.

I. A total eclipse of the Sun, April 26, invisible in the United States. II.-A partial eclipse of the Moon, May 11, visible in the United States east of Cincinnati, the Moon rising with the earth's shadow upon it. The eclipse at New-York 7:41 p. m., Washington 7:29 p. m. and Boston 7:53 p. m. III-A partial eclipse of the Sun, visible as follows:

ends

Place.

Place.

Albany, N. Y.. 0:08 p. m.

Boston
Chicago
Cincinnati
New-York

0:24 p. m.
11:04 a. m.
11:19 a. m.
0:12 p. m.

Eclipse
begins.

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For 1892.
TAN JOR 1892

Eclipse
ends.

3:09 p. m.
3:21 p. m.
1:48 p. m.
2:14 p. m.
3:09 p. m.

March
June

Spring begins March 19, 10h. 22m. p. m.
Summer begins June 20, 6h. 24m. p. m.

The eclipse will be visible over nearly the whole of North America and the West Indies. Greatest size of the eclipse, 10.9 digits.

IV. A total eclipse of the Moon, November 4, invisible in the United States, but seen in Asia and Europe.

Septuagesima Sunday..
Sexa esim. Sunday.
Qui quag sima Sunday.
Ash Wednesday...
Quadragesima Sund y.
Mid-Lent Sunday.
Palm Sunday.
Good Friday.
Easter Sunday..
Low Sunday..
Rogation Sunday
Ascension Day..

THE FOUR SEASONS.

Mercury, until March 6; from April 19 to
June 20; from August 25 to October 7,
and after December 11.
Venus, after July 9.

Mercury, from March 6 to April 19; from
June 20 to August 25, and from October
7 to December 11.
Venus, until July 9.

Philadelphia ..
Portland, Ore....
St. Louis...
Washington

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MORNING STARS.

Mercury, January 22, May 20 and September 14, rising before the sun; also March 28, July 26 and November 20, setting after the sun.

EVENING STARS.

Autumn begins September 22, 8h. 59m.

a. m.

Winter begins December 21, 3h. 19m. a. m.

Eclipse begins. 0:06 p. m. 8:48 a. m. 10:55 a. m. .11:56 a. m.

Mars, until March 29.

Jupiter, from March 20 to July 15.
Saturn, after September 25.

PLANETS BRIGHTEST.

Mars, after March 29,

Jupiter, until March 20 and after July 15.
Saturn, until September 25.

Eclipse

ends. 3:03 p. m. 9:50 a. m. 1:37 p. m. 2:56 p. m.

Venus, June 2 and August 15.
Mars, August 4.
Jupiter, October 12.
Satuin, March 16.

CHURCH DAYS AND CYCLES OF TIME.

Feb. 14
Feb. 21
..Feb. 28
March 2

Whit Sunday (Pentecost).
Trin ty Sunday..
Corpus Christi..
Adv nt Sundar
Dominical Laters..
Epact

March 6
March 27

April 10

April 15
April 17
April 24
May 22
May 26

Golden Number.
Solar Cycle...
Roman Indiction..
Julian Period..
Dionysian Period.
Jewish Lunar Cycle.

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TABLE OF MERIDIAN PASSAGE, RISING AND SETTING OF PLANETS

FOR WASHINGTON. D. C., IN 1892.
JUPITER.

MARS.

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VENUS.

h. m.
1 55 p.m.

66
66
66

66

66

66

66

66

66 66

66 21.. 3 5
June 1.. 2 52
11..2 28
21.. 1 49
July 1. 0 55
11..11 50 a.m.
21.. 10 28
Aug. 1.. 9 58

66
66

66

66

""
66

66

11.. 9 27

66

""

46

66

21.. 9 9 Sept. 1.. 8 59 11..8 56 66 21.. 8 56 Oct. 1.. 8 58 66 11.. 9 1 21.. 9 5 Nov. 1.. 9 9 914 919 9.26 11.. 934 21..9 45

66 66

11.. 21..

Dec. 1..

66

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66

66

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10 17

66
66

9 46
8 58
7 58
rises a.m.
3 51
3 1
2 29

..
66
66
66
66

2 31

2 1

66

1 59
26
215
2.29

66
66

2 43

3 3
3 21
340
4 2
4 23 66
4 46

66

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66

66

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8 09 a.m.]
7 55
7 41

66

66
66

7 26

66

7 13

7 0
646

6 35

6 22

6 7

3 01 a.m.

2.53

66

66

46

2 45 1236 12 28 218 26

66

66

66

1 57
144
129

+66
66
56
66
66
66
66

66
66

1 12
1 0 55
0 36
0 13
11 50 p.m.
11 22
10 54
110 24 66
9 52
915
8 35
7 45
6 59
Isets. a.m.
237

66

66

66

66
66

66
66
66
66
66
66
66
66
66

0 10
0 1
11 52 p.m.
11 44
11 36

".
66

66

66

66

66

66

"6

552

5 36

66

6 19

66

4.59

66

4 12

66
66
66
66
66
46
66

4 15
349
319
2 45
2 7
122
0.29 66
[11 34 p.m.
10 46
958
920

66
66

46

66

8 46 8 18

66

66
66

66

66

7 23
7 31
17 9
650
6 32
615
5 59
15 42 66

6.

66
66

2 1

1 33

1 9
0 52
0 36

0 22

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952 " 98" 826"

744"

7 4" 622" 538 ** sets. a.m 440"

1022"

940 "

358"

66

319" 239 159 " 116"

859 " 819 ** 739 656" 617 037 539" 11 54p.m 52" 1117 425 "1038 "6 34810 0" 39" 919 " 233"

157 "

119 ** 2 7 044 " 1 24 09" 0.40 614 66 11 34a.m rises a. m 11 56 p.mse's. a m[11 0" 11 7 1025" 10 19 936

530" 441"

946"*

357"

911"

853

313"

835"

241"

142"
114 "

759"
723"
645 "

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Meridian
Passage

66

819 "
729"
656"

43"
319"

66

842" 84"

724 " 648" 612"

50" 427"

349 "

315"

241 " 25"

130" 052"

THE NEW STANDARD OF TIME.

The dates given in this almanac, with the exception of those for the rising and setting of the sun, moon and planets and the times of high tide, are in accordance with the railroad standards of time.

The Eastern standard meridian. for the eastern part of the United States passes very nearly through Ogdensburg, N. Y.

The Central standard meridian passes through New-Orleans, La., and a little west of Chicago.

The Mountain meridian passes through the Rocky Mountains very near Pike's Peak, Col.

The Pacific standard meridian is near the Pacific Coast, San Francisco being about nine and a half minutes of time west of it.

For the several standard meridians themselves the dates of the almanac will be correct.

For any place east of any of these standard meridians, and within 7 of it, the times of the rising or setting of any heavenly body, expressed in standard time, may be derived from those given in the almanac by subtracting from the almanac dates one minute of time for every quarter of a degree of longitude that the place is distant from that standard meridian, or four minutes of time for each degree.

For a place west of any standard meridian, and within 7 of it, add to the almanac dates one minute of time for each quarter of a degree, or four minutes of time for each degree of distance from that standard.

PERPETUAL CALENDAR.

(See page 4.)

SHOWING THE DAY OF THE WEEK OF ANY DATE, OLD STYLE OR NEW, BEFORE OR AFTER CHRIST.

EXPLANATION.-Under or over each month will be found the names or abbreviations for the days of the week, arranged in seven different orders or sequences, reading from left to right.

These are marked as sequence A, sequence B, and so on. At the right or left of each sequence is given the centurial year of the century for which that sequence may be used-old style dates, or reckonings under the Julian Calendar, marked at the left; new style dates, according to the Gregorian Calendar, at the right; thus 16 at left of se

quence D shows that this sequence is to be used for all old style dates from 1600 to 1699, as the date of landing of Pilgrims. Dec. 11, O. S., 1620. At the right of sequence F, 16 shows that this is the sequence for all new style dates in the same period, as the landing of Pilgrims, Dec. 21, 1620. The 18 at right of sequence D indicates this as the one to use for the present century, 1800 to 1899.

Above or beneath those sequences are given, for each month, the odd years of the century, from 00 to 99, reading from left to right and so arranged that all the years of a century in which the first of the month falls on a certain day of the week are in the same colunin. Thus, take the table for January and the sequence for the present century, D, all the years in the first column, 4, 9, 15, 26, etc., are over Sunday in the sequence named; so the 1st of January in all these years is Sunday. In the second column are all the years in which the 1st falls on Monday, and so on. If we bear in mind that the 8th, 15th, 22d and 29th of any month will come on the same day of the week as the 1st, this arrangement gives at once the day of the week of five dates in any month, and from these the day of any other date in that menth can easily be found.

Now with a given date. to flud the day of the week, as Aug. 23, 1841. In the table for August find the given year 41; take the sequence in line with the centurial year 18, D, and in this sequence above 41 we find Sunday. The August 1 in that year was Sunday, and the 8th, 15th and 22d must have fallen on Sunday also; and if the 22d was Sunday the 23d was Monday. What day of the week was Dec. 11, 0. S., 1620? Use sequence D for 1600s O. S. and in this above 20 in December find Friday. Then the 1st and the 8th came on Friday, and the 11th must have been Monday.

Take the same date as given, new style, Dec. 21, 1620. Use sequence for the 1600s N. S. and above 20 find Tuesday, which was the 1st and the 22d, and the 21st was Monday. Then the Pilgrims landed on Monday.

If the last Thursday in November, 1885, be Thanksgiving Day, what will be the date? We find that, in 1885 the 1st and therefore the 29th of November comes on Sunday; then the preceding Thursday, or Nov. 26th, is the last Thursday, or Thanksgiving Day.

This arrangement involves no comparison or distinction further than this: For the months of January and February of centesimal leap years only, as 1600, 2000, etc., by the Gregorian Calendar, the heavy-faced 00s in the first column are to be used, but for centesimal years not leap years the 00s in the second column are required. By the Julian Calendar every centesimal year was leap year; by the Gregorian Caler dar cnly every fourth centesimal year is a leap year. 1700 O. S. then should be regarded as a leap year, while 1700 N. S. is not.

As to the intervals between the times when a given day of the month falls on a certain week-day, as Jan. 1st cn Saturday, this occurred in 1803-14-20-25-31, and so on at intervals of 11, 6, 5 and 6 years, which intervals are repeated and would continue without intorruption but for the cmission of leap year in 1900, which will cavso an irregularity of 12 years, either in one period, or in two intervals of 6 years each, or in one of 7 and another of 5 years, after which the regular intervals will be successively repeated again. But police the difference in the grouping of the years under January and February, and that of the other ten months. Take the years in the column in which we find 3 under any other month, and the calendar for those months repeats as follows: 3, 8, 14, 25, 31, showing that the order for an entire year recurs less frequently, as in 3, 14, 25, 31. The order for any leap year is repeated at intervals of 28 years; thus the calendar for 1856 corresponds with that for 1884, and this order would obtain again in 1912 but for the omission of leap year in 1900, by which the interval is extended 12 years and the 29th of February will not fall on Friday again until 1924. The order for any year next succeeding a leap year will be repeated in 6 years, while the orders for the second and third years following a leap year will be repeated in 11 years. Then the calendar for 81 will be repeated in '87; the order that obtained in '82 will occur again in '93, and that for '83 corresponds with 91.

What has been shown as to leap year dates, as Feb. 29th, recurring on the same day of the week, is of course true of Inauguration Day, March 4th, of every fourth year. This came on Sunday in 1821, 1849 and 1877, and if 1900 were a leap year it would occur again in 1905, but owing to that omission it will not recur until 1917. The irregular interval caused by the omission of leap year is sometimes 40 and sometimes 12 days. Under the Julian Calendar established 46 B. C. by Julius Caesar, the calendar for an entire century was repeated every 700 years, and therefore the sequence of days given here for 1700 O. S., G., answers also for the time 700 years earlier, i. e., the century 1000 to 1099; also for the years 300 to 399. In this way the sequences given may cover the time back to the beginning of the Christian Era. Under the Gregorian Calendar the orders are repeated every 400 years and only four of the sequences are required, viz., C, D, E and F; F serving alike for 1600 and 2000, E for 1700 and 2100, etc.

Pope Gregory XIII in 1582 undertook to reform the Julian Calendar. To correct the errors that had accumulated and to guard against future inaccuracies, he suppressed ten days and provided for the omission of leap year every centesimai year. excepting every fourth centesimal year. Under the Gregorian Calendar 1700, 1800 and 1900 are not counted as leap years, but 1600 and 2000 are. This calendar was adopted by Germany in 1700 and by England not until 1752, by which time, as 1700 had passed as leap year, the diference amounted to 11 days, and Parliament rectified the error by suppressing 11 days in September of that year. The Julian Calendar stil: prevails in Russia, and as 1800 has passed with them as leap year, the difference between their reckoning and ours is 12 days, so that August 7 in Russia is the same as August 19 with us.

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