Cultivating the Rosebuds: The Education of Women at the Cherokee Female Seminary, 1851-1909

Front Cover
University of Illinois Press, 1997 M01 15 - 240 pages
Recipient of a 1995 Critics' Choice Award of the American Educational
Studies Association
Established by the Cherokee Nation in 1851 in present-day eastern Oklahoma,
the nondenominaional Cherokee Female Seminary was one of the most important
schools in the history of American Indian education. Devon Mihesuah explores
its curriculum, faculty, administration, and educational philosophy.
"[An] important work. . . . It tells the fascinating and occasionally
poignant story of the Cherokee Female Seminary, which enrolled its first
class of 'Rosebuds, ' as the seminarians called themselves, in 1851."
--Choice
"I recommend it to any serious student of the Cherokee people."
-- Robert J. Conley, author of Mountain Windsong
"Of the many books about Cherokee history, few deal with the issue
of acculturation in the post-removal period and none so effectively as
Devon Mihesuah's Cultivating the Rosebuds." -- Nancy Shoemaker,
Western Historical Quarterly
"Required reading for anyone remotely interested in the history
of Native American education." -- David W. Adams, History of Education
Quarterly

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Contents

Foundations
7
Establishing the Seminary
18
The Early Years 185176
29
Teachers Curriculum and Administration 18761909
51
Life at the Seminary 18761909
72
Medicine for the Rosebuds Health Care at the Seminary
85
Farewell to the Seminary Graduates and Former Students
95
Epilogue
113
Appendixes
117
Notes
133
Selected Bibliography
171
Index
195
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