Memoirs of the Life of the Rt: Hon. Richard Brinsley Sheridan, Volume 1

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Redfield, 1858
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Page 145 - Well, I'll not debate how far scandal may be allowable ; but in a man, I am sure, it is always contemptible. We...
Page 156 - Premium, the plain state of the matter is this: I am an extravagant young fellow who wants to borrow money; you I take to be a prudent old fellow, who have got money to lend. I am blockhead enough to give fifty per cent, sooner than not have it; and you, I presume, are rogue enough to take a hundred if you can get it. Now, sir, you see we are acquainted at once, and may proceed to...
Page 120 - And scorn assumes compassion's doubtful mien, To warn me off from the encumber'd scene. This must not be ; — and higher duties crave Some space between the theatre and the grave ; That, like the Roman in the Capitol, I may adjust my mantle ere I fall : My life's brief act in public service flown, The last, the closing scene, must be my own. Here, then, adieu! while yet some well-graced parts May fix an ancient favourite in your hearts, Not quite to be forgotten, even when You look on better actors,...
Page 180 - Besides — I can tell you it is not always so safe to leave a play in the hands of those who write themselves. SNEER. What, they may steal from them, hey, my dear Plagiary ? SIR FRET.
Page 194 - ... and not very propitious to wit — subduing both manners and conversation to a sort of polished level, to rise above which is often thought almost as vulgar as to sink below it.
Page 171 - That's very true indeed, Sir Peter ; and after having married you, I should never pretend to taste again, I allow.
Page 216 - When he makes his jokes, you applaud the accuracy of his memory, and 'tis only when he states his facts that you admire the flights of his imagination.
Page 252 - ... and if they were reserved for the proper stage, they would, no doubt, receive what the Honourable Gentleman's abilities always did receive, the plaudits of the audience ; and it would be his. fortune 'sui plausu gaudere theatri.' But this was not the proper scene for the exhibition of those elegancies.
Page 158 - ... duodecimo phaeton, she desired me to write some verses on her ponies; upon which, I took out my pocketbook, and in one moment produced the following : " Sure never were seen two such beautiful ponies ; Other horses are clowns, but these macaronies : To give them this title I'm sure can't be wrong, Their legs are so slim, and their tails are so long.
Page 53 - Mr. Richard S******* having attempted, in a letter left behind him for that purpose, to account for his scandalous method of running away from this place, by insinuations derogating from my character...

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