The Poetical Works of James Chambers, Itinerant Poet: With the Life of the Author ...

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sold, 1820 - 166 pages
 

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Page i - tis the mind that makes the body rich ; And as the sun breaks through the darkest clouds, So honour peereth in the meanest habit. What, is the jay more precious than the lark, Because his feathers are more beautiful ? Or is the adder better than the eel, Because his painted skin contents the eye ? O, no, good Kate ; neither art thou the worse For this poor furniture, and mean array.
Page xii - That giant-building, that high-bounding wall, Those bare-worn walks, that lofty thund'ring hall ! That large loud clock, which tolls each dreaded hour, Those gates and locks, and all those signs of power; It is a prison, with a milder name, Which few inhabit without dread or shame.
Page 63 - Thro' burning deserts now compelled to fly, Our bravest legions moulder fast away, Thousands of wounds and sickness left to die, While hovering ravens marked them for their prey. Ah ! sure remorse their savage hearts must rend Whose selfish desperate phrenzy could decree, That in one mass of murder man should blend, Who sent the slave to fight against the free. Unequal contest ! at fair Freedom's call The lowliest hind glows with celestial fire ; She rules, directs, pervades, and orders all, And...
Page xvii - ... cuckoo. A cottage was hired at Worlingworth, and furnished, and his poems were to have been printed for his benefit ; but alas ! a scene of humble comfort seemed neither grateful to his mind nor auspicious to his Muse, for after residing there a month or two he set off...
Page i - From lowest place when virtuous things proceed, The place is dignified by the doer's deed...
Page xiii - Near yonder bridge, that strides the rippling brook, A hut once stood, in small sequester'd nook, Where Chambers lodg'd : though not of gipsy race, Yet, like that tribe, he often chang'd his place. A lonely wand'rer he, whose squalid form Bore the rude peltings of the wintry storm : An hapless outcast, on whose natal day No star propitious beam'da kindly ray ; By some malignant influence doom'd to roam The world's wide, dreary waste, and know no home. Yet Heaven, to cheer him as he pass'd along,...
Page 59 - He gained the summit of his native hill, And saw the well-known prospect spread below, The farm, the cot, the hamlet and the mill ; In spite of fortitude, one struggling sigh Shook the firm texture of his tortured heart ; And from his hollow and dejected eye One trembling tear hung ready to depart.
Page 60 - is the fair scene to me, Since last across this narrow path I went ! The soaring lark felt not superior glee, Nor any human breast more true content.
Page 61 - The gaudy sergeant caught my wondering eye ; And as his tongue of war and honor spake, I felt a wish — to conquer or to die ! " Then, while he bound the ribands on my brow, He talk'd of captains kind, and generals good ; Said, a whole nation would my fame avow, And bounty called the purchase of my blood. " Yet I refused that bounty, — I disdained To sell my service in a righteous cause ; And such, (to my dull sense it was...
Page xiv - ... propitious beam'da kindly ray ; By some malignant influence doom'd to roam The world's wide, dreary waste, and know no home. Yet Heaven, to cheer him as he pass'd along, Infused in life's sour cup the sweets of song. Mr. Cordy's poetic friend, in a footnote to his verses, says of the wanderer-poet : — He was a person of mild, unassuming, and inoffensive manners, and possessed a mind strongly tinctured with a sense of religion. And Mr. Cordy himself remarks : — It is astonishing to witness...

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