Page images
PDF
EPUB

INDEX TO PREVIOUS VOLUMES-Continued.
PAGE.
PAGE.

PAGE. Swedish Hospital Fair, 1897.. 196 Troop C, 1899.... .449, 503 War Relief Work, 1899....505, 566 Swedish Poet, Bust of, 1895 154 Tunnel Proposed, bet. X. Y. War Revenue Tax, 1899. 610 Tabernacle, Diagrams, 1888, and Brooklyn, 1897.. 364 War with Spain, 1899.. 500-519 234; 1894

343 Tunnel, Long Island, 1891,77; Wars of 19th Century, 1899... 483 Talmage Anniversary, 1895... 65 1897

361 | Water Front, 1893, 100; 1897, Tariff, Dingley Law, 1898. 456 Union Soldiers of Rebellion, 152; 1898, 152; 1899.... 164 Tariff, McKinley Law, 1891, 27, 46 1897. 238; 1898.

421 Water Pipes in Brooklyn, 1891 244 Tariff Rates, Law of 1894, University Extension, 1897, Water Supply of Brooklyn, 1895.. 66 456; 1898. 207 1893.

103 Telegraphy, Speed in, 1891. 241 | Universities, the World, 1891. 115 Wedding Anniversaries, 1894. 247 Temperature from 1876 to 1885, Vacant Public Land, 1897, Weight of Men, 1890...

95 1886 21 148; 1898

497 Westchester Co., Offcial List Ten bessee Centennial Exposi. Values of Silver, 1891

202 and Incorporated Villages, tion, 1897, 888; 1898., 892 Van Wyck, Robt. A., Mayor 1897.

829 Theatres, History of, in Brook. ,(with portrait), 1898.., 308 West Point, 1887

63 lyn, 1890.

32-34 Venezuelan Boundary, 1896, Whale Fishery, L. I., 1894 48 Tidal' Differences and Ratios, 316; 1897

459 Wind, Force of, 1891.

77 1890...

26 Vessels built at Brooklyn Navy Women Writers of Brooklyn, Tillage Vacant City Lands, '99 144 Yard, 1896....

131 1892...

249 Title to Lands under Tide Vice-Presidents of the U. S., World Columbian Exposition, Water, 1898... 34 1887, 123; 1888.

147 1892, 215; 1893, 99, 129, 176; Trans-Siberian R. R., 1899.... 47 VntersDirections for, 1886, 1894

259 Treasurers Kings County, 1890 232 88; 1887.

23 Wurster, F W., Mayor, 1896. 160 Trees in Prospect Park, 1889.. 66 Wallabout Market, 1889 (Dia. Yellowstone National Park, Trees on Long Island, 1888... 172 gram), 122; 1893, 151; 1897. 155 1887

24

[merged small][merged small][merged small][graphic][merged small][merged small][merged small]

THE BROOKLYN EAGLE ALMAYAC.

VOLUME XV.

JANUARY, 1900.

No. 1 OF EAGLE LIBRARY.

before in the history of the book. The ALMANAC has become generally recognized as a reference book which occupies a place in the home, the office, the counting room and the library ; a book which by the carefulness of its preparation and by its immense value has secured a hold upon the public which cannot be equalled by any other volume of its kind. It covers in detail the fields of New York City entire and Long Island, with particular attention paid to the Borough of Brooklyn, since it is there that the book first became so well known. “Consuli the EAGLE ALMANAC" has become a household phrase which emphasizes the high estimation in which the volume is held by the public generally. It occupies a place as a manual of reference in all the public schools of the city. It contains maps of the boroughs of Greater New York and also of Long Island, which are revised from year to year, and which can be de pended upon to be correct and up to date. These maps are especially appreciated by bicyclists, who findthem invaluable. The tables and lists of public schools, parks, clubs, societies, wards, cemeteries, station houses, districts, and churches, are consulted daily and never found wanting. Election matters, municipal, state and national, are given a great deal of space and detail in the book, besides one thousand and one other subjects to answer any question wbich may arise.

The year 1899, the closing of the century, has been one replete with incidents of more or less value and interest to the public, and the BROOKLYN DAILY EAGLE, occupying its usual place at the head of the line as a thorough-going and up to date newspaper, has carefully tried to present the news to the public as truthfully as possible and without any of the sensational journalism which

has marked the progress of some of its contemporaries. Following its own example of 1898, in the distribution of the war revenue bonds, and its usefulness to the government during the Spanish-American war, the EAGLE during the past year has headed many movements for the assistance of the public and the government. Chief among these was the EAGLE Dewey Home Fund. The EAGLE was the first paper to urge the starting of a fund, the suggestion having been made in a letter to the Eagle by Rear Admiral Upshur. About the middle of May, a national committee, with Mr. Ellis H. Roberts as Treasurer, was appointed and subscriptions were called for. The BROOKLYN DAILY EAGLE placed its services at the disposal of the committee. So succeessful were their efforts, that when the national fund closed in October with a total of $52,000, the portion which was sent in through the EAGLE amounted to $14,444.80 from 36,231 individual subscribers. The national committee anuounced it as their intention to send the engraved souvenir receipts to subscribers donating ten cents and over. As many of the school children of Brooklyn had subscribed amounts less than ten cents, the EAGLE generously sent out to these children a fac-simile of the receipts which the national committee gave. Thus all subscribers large and small were enabled to get a souvenir of their contribution to the fund for the home of the Admiral. The Eagli published in Noven. Der s.veral pictures showing exterior and interior views of the Dewey House, and gave two flags to the public schools sending in the largest contributions to the fuad.

In anticipation of the large number of Americans who will visit Paris during the Exposition of 1900, the BROOKLYN DAILY EAGLE removed its headquarters to spacious rooms at the corner of Rue Cambon and the Boulevard de la Madeleine, a position in the center of Paris. On June 18, 1899, these offices were opened

with a reception, and the EAGLE in Paris was given a rousing send-off on its good work. In the European edition of the New York Herald appeared the following:

**The BROOKLYN DAILY EAGLE rooms occupy a handsome site at the corner of the Boulevard de la Madeleine and he Rue Cambon. They include a ladies' salon, a writing room, and a library where American papers are filed.

"The object of this enterprise of the BROOKLYN EAGLE is to furnish information as to European resorts to travelers. The rooms are well fitte i up and the location is central."

The Eagle's enterprise in thus furnishing a place where Americans could feel at home, where the American papers could be found, and where every courtesy and assistance in the power of the office would be offered to visitors, has aroused from all sides expressions of approval and good will. Americans returning from Paris are delighted with the EAGLE Bureau and its capable and courteous managers.

As has been the habit of the Eagle in past years, a number of excursions were conducted to different parts of the country which proved very popular. Early in the year a number of Brooklynites made up one of these parties to Porto Rico to visit the scenes of the Spanish-American war, and later an excursion was conducted to California and the Yellowstone. The efficient manner in which these parties have always been ron has made them an immense success.

The EAGLE s enterprise again came to the front during the reception to Admiral Dewey in the fall of the rear. It was realized by the management that on account of this celebration and also because of the English-American yacht races the city would be crowded with out-of-town visitors, and it would be extremely difficult for these visitors to obtain satisfactory boarding places for the two or three days they might remain in the city. The EAGI E therefore issued a guide book which was seot broadcast throughout the country and which contained a carefully selected list of boarding houses, as well as private families who were willing to take one or two boarders or roomers for the two or three days of the reception. The success of this little book can best be understood when it is known that several editions were printed. The Eagle also chartered a steamer for the day of the naval parade and took a party of distinguished citizens of Brooklyn to view the water carnival.

Although the elections of 1899 were purely local the EAGLE gave the public its usual efficient service in the way of quick bulletins. The yacht races were also carefully bulletined to large crowds daily.

Among the EAGLE's publications for the year were the EAGLE Index, an invaluable reference book to the pap 'r, and the Spoopendyke Sketches in an issue of the EAGLE Library. These humorous sketches appeared in the Sunday EAGLE

of about twenty years ago and their revival in library form created a great deal of intere-t in the work of Stanley Huntley. The other issues of the EAGLE Library were:

No. 31. “The Federal Bankruptcy Law of 1898, with Tabulated Index, Time Table and Tariff, Supreme Court Rules Formes, etc." Cloth cover, small size. Price. $1.00. No. 32, April, 1999. "The Civil Service Law of New York State and the Ahearn New York City Teachers' Salary Law, passed by the Legislature of 1899." No. 33, “ Municipal Ownership and the War on Wealth Articles by Mul.'" No. 34, " Spoopendyke Papers." Pricm, 25 cents. No. 35, “The Charter of the City of New York, with Amendments, passed by the Legislature of 1898 and 1899." Price 10 cents. No. 36, " The Primary and Election Laws as Amended by the Legislature of 1899." Price, 10 cents. No. 37, “ The New Building Code of New York City."

ASTRONOMICAL CALCULATIONS For the year of our Lord 1900, being until July 4th tue one hundred and twenty fourth year of the

Independence of the United States.

BY BERLIN H. WRIGHT, PENN YAN, N. Y. These calculations have been made expressly for the EAGLE ALMANAC, and may be relied upon as absolutely correct.

ECLIPSES FOR 1900.
There will be three Eclipses this year, two of the Sun and one of the Moon, as follows:

1. A Total Eclipse of the Sun May 28, visible as a partial eclipse throughout most of the United States, the line of totality extending from Norfolk, Va., through Raleigh, N. C., Mobile, Ala., and New Orleans North of this

line the eclipse will be upon the Sun's southern limb, and south of it upon the northern limb. The northern limit of the partial phase of this eclipse is in northern Alaska and the southern near the equator, on this continent.

[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

II. A Partial Eclipse of the Moon June 13, which is scarcely more than a mere contact of limbs; therefore too small to make account of.

III. An Annular Eclipse of the Sun November 22, visible in the southern Philippine Islands, Australia and southern Africa. MORNING STARS.

EVENING STARS. (Rising after Midnight.)

(Rising before Midnight.) MERCURY, until February 9, March 24 to May 30, Aug. MERCURY, from February 9 to March 24, May 30 to

ust 1 to September 18, and after November 20. August 1, and Septeinber 18 to November 20. VENUS, after July 8.

VENUS, until July 8. Mars, from January 16 to November 22.

Mars, until February 16 and after November 22. JUPITER, until

February 28, and after December 14. JUPITER, from February 28 to December 14. SATURN, until March 25, and after December 29. SATURN, from March 25 to December 29. URANUS, until March 3 and after December 5.

URANUS, from March 3 to December 5.

PLANETS BRIGHTEST OR BEST SEEN. MERCURY ( ), March 1-5, setting shortly after the Sun, also August 24 to September 1, rising shortly before the Sun. VENUS (), June 1 and August 14. MARS (), not this year, but will be very bright at close of the year. JUPITER (44), May 27. SATURN ( 3 ), June 23. URANUS (H), June 1. NEPTUNE (1), December 19.

THE SEASONS (75TH MERIDIAN TIME).
Winter begins, 1899, December 21, 7h. 48m., P. M., and lasts 89d. Oh. 46m.
Spring begins, 1900, March 20, Sh. 34m. P. M., and lasts 92d, 19h. 29m.
Summer begins, 1900, June 21, 4h. 3m. P. M., and lasts 93d. 15h. 5m
Autumn begins, 1900, September 23, 7h. 8m. A. M., and lasts 89d. 18h. 25m.
Winter begins, 1900, December 22, 1h. 33m. A. M. Tropical year, 365d, 5h. 45m.

POSITION OF THE PLANETS EACH SUNDAY OF THE YEAR.

Planet.

Jan. Feb. Mar. April. May. June. July. Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec.

[merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small]

EMBER DAYS. Wednesday, Friday and Saturday after First Sunday in Lent..

.March 7, 9 and 10 Wednesday. Friday and Saturday after Pentecost..

..June 6, 8 and 9 Wednesday, Friday and Saturday after the 14th of September..

September 19, 21 and 22 Wednesday, Friday and Saturday after the 13th of December

December 19, 21 and 22 CHRONOLOGICAL CYCLES. Dominical Letter........... .G Julian Period..

6613 Epact..

.29 Dionysian Period. Lunar Cycle (Golden Number) .1 Jewish Lunar Cycle.

17 Solar Cycle...

.5 Mohammedan Era, Year 1318 begins May 1. Roman Indiction.

.13 Jewish Era, Year 5661 begins at sunset September 23.

RISING, SETTING, AND MERIDIAN PASSAGE OF THE PLANETS, 1900.

[blocks in formation]

H. M.
7 48
7 37
7 20
7 10
6 54
6 31
6 22
6 8
5 42
5 18

H. M. 11 7 10 39 9 59 9 20 8 45 80 7 41

H. M. H. M.

1 1 57 7 9 January,

11 2 8 7 30
21 2 16 7 48

1 2 23 8 7 February 11 2 28

8 25 21 2 82

8 40

1 2 35 8 53 March..

11 2 39 98
21 2 44

9 25
1

2 50 9 41 April ...

11
2 57

9 56
21 3 3 10 8

1 3 10 15 May

11 88 10 16
21 3 3 10 8

1 2 49 9 50 June..

11 2 24

8 20 21 1 43 8 34

0 48 rises July...

11 morn morn
21 10 41 4 0

1 9 53 3 12 August.

9 24 2 43 21 9 8 2 26

1 8 59 2 16 September..... 11 8 56 2 15

21 8 56 2 19

1 8 59 2 28 October..... 11

2 38 21 96 2 50

1 9 11 36 November. 11 9 15 3 20

21 9 20 3 35

9 27 3 52

11 9 85 4 10 December.

21 9 50 4 36 31 9 57

4 47

1. M. 6 44 7 10 7 34 7 59 8 23 8 44 92 9 23 9 45 10 7 10 27 10 42 10 51 10 52 10 42 10 22 9 49 90 rises morn 3 40 2 52 2 22 2 5 1 54 1 65 2 1 2 12 2 26 2 42 8 8 3 22 8 42

H. M. 0 20 0 14 05 morn 11 52 11 40 11 86 11 27 11 17 11 5 10 54 10 38 10 32 10 21 10 10 9 58 9 48 9 37 9 27 9 18 98 8 58 8 46 8 36 8 23 8 10 7 57

H. M. 7 18 7 9 6 55 6 46 6 33 6 12 65 5 50 5 33 5 14 4 54 4 28 4 18 4 0 3 43 3 23 38 2 52 2 38 2 25 2 12 2 0 1 47 1 87 1 25 1 14 1 4 0 52 0 81 0 27 0 11 eve. 11 36 11 16 10 52 10 25 9 56

H. M. 9 15 8 49 8 11 7 35 7 2 6 27 5 59 5 22 4 44 4 1 3 20 2 38 1 55 1 11 0 27 eve. 10 49 10 9 9 22 8 40 7 59 7 16 6 37 6 0 5 22 4 47 4 13 8 40 38 2 37 2 3 1 83 1 2 0 83 03 morn 11 4

H. M. 4 3 3 31 3 0 2 25 1 52 1 18 0 50 0 18 eve. 10 57 10 15 9 33 8 51 8 4 7 21 sets morn 3 25 2 38 1 56 1 15 0 82 eve. 11 12 10 34 9 58 9 23 8 49 8 16 7 44 7 9 rises morn 7 29 6 59 6 31 6 1

H. M. 4 27 3 56 3 25 2 50 2 18 1 44 1 16 0 39 eve. 11 23 10 41 9 59 9 17 8 30 7 46 sets morn 3 46 3 3 2 20 1 39 0 56 eve. 11 37 10 59 10 23 9 48 9 15 8 42 8 11 7 37 rises morn 7 58 728 70 6 80

626 5 45 5 6 4 26 3 45 3 5 2 23 1 37 0 55 0 18 eve. 10 44 9 48

4 22 4 10 3 50 8 29 36 2 48 2 29 2 13 1 58 1 13 1 30 1 17 1 7 0 55 0 45 0 37 0 27 08 05 eve. 11 86 11 20 11 2 10 89 10 12 9 44

H. M. 62 5 28 4 54 4 15 3 40 3 4 2 36 1 59 1 21 0 40 0 1 eve. 10 40 10 0 9 18 8 82 7 50 sets morn 3 53 2 58 2 25 1 44 1 3 0 19 eve. 10 58 10 20 9 43 97 8 27 7 52 7 17 6 42 6 8 rises morn

H. M. 6 31 5 57 5 B 4 44 4 9 3 33 35 2 28 1 50 19 0 30 eve. 11 9 10 29 9 47 9 1 8 19 sets morn

[blocks in formation]

7 27 7 10 6 50 6 30 68 5 45 5 19 4 51 4 20

7 10 6 31 5 53 5 16 4 39 4 3 8 23 2 48 2 13 1 38 1 4 morn 11 55

3 27 2 54 2 13 1 82 0 48 eve. 11 27 10 49 10 12 9 36 8 56 8 21 7 46 7 11 6 37 rises morn

4 27
4 59
5 18

[blocks in formation]

*When two days are given as the beginning of the month (Rosh-Chodesh) the second day is counted as the first of the month, excepting Tishri, which is always reckoned from the first.

The year 5660 is the seventeenth year of the 298th Cycle of nineteen years.

[blocks in formation]
[graphic]

1817... 9 Ramadan.. January 3, 1900.. 80 1318.. 4 Rabia II.....

July 29..

29 1817.... 10 Schewall.. February 2.. 29

1818. 5 Jom hadi August 27.

80 1317 11 Dsu'l Kadah. March 3

80 1318. 6 Jomhadi II. September 26 1317. 12 Dsu'l Hjjab. April 2. 29 1318 7 Redjeb..

30 1818.

October 25.
1 Muharrem May 1.

30
1318.
8 Sheban

November 24. 29 1318. 2 Saphar...

May 31.
29 1818. 9 Ramadan

December 23. 80 1318....13 Rabia I......

80 The year 1317 is the twenty-seventh year of the forty-fourth Cycle. See BROOKLYN EAGLE ALMANAC, 1897, for full explanation.

June 29...

WEATHER SIGNALS.

No. 1.
WHITE FLAG.
Clear or Fair

Weather.

BLUE

No. 2.
BLUE FLAG.
Rain or Snow.

No. 3.
WHITE AND
BLUE FLAG.
Local Rain or

Snow.

..0.4.

BLACK FLAG.
Temperature.

No. 5.
WHITE-
BLACK CENTER.

Cold Wave.

BLUE

When number 4 is placed above number 1, 2, or 3, it indicates warmer; when below, colder; when not displayed, the temperature is expected to remain about stationary. During the late spring and early fall the cold-wave flag is also used as a frost-warning flag to indicate anticipated frosts. When number 5 is displayed, number 4 is always omitted. When displayed on poles, the signals should be arranged to read downward; when displayed from horizontal supports, a small streamer should be attached to indicate the point from which the signals are to be read.

Wind Direction and Velocity Signals.

1st.-A storm signal; red flag with black center. 20.-- When red pennant is hoisted above storm signal winds are expected from the northeast quadrant; when below from the southeast quadrant. 3d. - When white pennant is hoisted above stci a signal, winds are expected from the northwest quadrant ; when below from the southwest quadrant. 4th. --Red pennant displayed alone, indicates storm of moderate strength. 5th.-Hurricane signal; two red flags with black centers, displayed one above the other, and will be used to announce the expected approach of tropical hurricanes, and also of those extremely severe and dangerous storms which occasionally move across the lakes and northern Atlantic coast. 6th.–Night storm signals; a red light for easterly winds, and a red and white light for westerly winds.

Tornadoes and Cyclones. The tornado is a sudden outburst of wind in an otherwise quiet, sultry atmosphere: it is ushered in by a loud, indescribable roar, similar to a continuous roll of thunder; its path is very narrow-seldom more than 500 feet wide at greatest destruction; it moves, generally, from southwest to northeast, and rarely extends more than twenty miles; it very often rises in the air, to descend again at a point a few miles ahead; it is generally accompanied by thunder storms, with often a bright glow in the cloud; this cloud has usually a funnel shape, which appears to be whirling, though some observers have described its appearance like that of a huge ball rolling forward. A tornado

may be considered as the result of an extreme development of conditions which otherwise produce thunderstorms.

A cyclone, on the other hand, is a very broad storm, oftentimes 1,000 miles in diameter, and sometimes can be followed half around the world; the winds circulate about it from right to left, or the way one turns clock hands backward (in the Southern Hemisphere this motion is reversed). The air pressure always falls as one approaches the center, where, at sea, there is a portentous calm, with clear sky visible at times. The cyclone winds often rise to hurricane force, but are not to be compared with the extreme violence of the tornado, before which the most solid structures are razed.

The total receipts from customs at Honolulu, gest exports ever made from the Philippine IslHawali, for 1898 were $896,975.70 as against $708,- ands were in 1870, when $29, 204,000 worth of mer493.05 for 1897, an increase of $188,482.65.

chandise was sent out. In 1897 it is estimated According to a recent consular report, the lar that exports were $20,978,898.

« PreviousContinue »