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pothesis that it was written by Dr. Latham. Semitic and Oriental writings; but there is It was said, and it might well have been no room in the Semitic or Oriental spirit true, that the reviewer was a learned and (even though it were shown that chivalry accomplished man. Nothing more likely; itself came from the Arabs) for love of the yet a child of seven, with the sensibility highest type known to the Western mind. which he lacked, would not have fallen into In the first place, reading writers like his error, or any error of a similar kind. Tieck and Fouqué, we become conscious of To take another illustration. There are a peculiar and inscrutable, but deeply fasmillions of people, including men of great cinating, purity of atmosphere. A purity learning and piety, who seem absolutely which is so child-like that it permits free blind to the difference between the Christ reference to topics which to the Latin or of the Latin imagination and the child-like Celtic intelligence are inclosed in company Christ of the Teutonic imagination. But with topics relating to the accidents of nuto return to Love and the Talinud. Every trition - a never-failing sign of the non-Teuone will remember the exultation (surpris- tonic spirit. There are love passages in ing to those who are familiar with their Tieck and in Fouqué which could not be Apocrypha as well as with their Bible) with read aloud in a mixed circle in England; which certain Talmudic deliverances about there are two sentences in “Undine” (the women were received when the article of M. last of Chapter VII. and the second of Deutsch appeared in the Quarterly Review. Chapter VIII.) which are omitted in some

“What becomes now of the Teutonic or- of the English translations. But can anyigin of the household virtues ?” asked an able thing be more childlike-pure, or more near pen in the Pall Mall Gazette. Whoever has to heaven? And yet it is utterly foreign to said that the household virtues were of Teu- the Eastern or Semitic spirit. That spirit tonic origin has talked nonsense. But the always finds the woman an inferior and unquestion as to Love, between the Western clean nature. She is subjected. She is spirit and the Oriental or Semitic spirit, has the temptress. She has to be “purified." nothing to do, one way or the other, with Among the Hebrews the mother of a girl the household virtues. Let us try and see had to undergo a quarantine of twice the what really it is.

length appointed to the mother of a boy Many of our readers probably know Miss (Levit. xii. 5, and Rev. xiv. 4). And, Dora Greenwell as the author of some ten- whatever modifications this way of looking der poetry and some thoughtful prose. at women undergoes, it is never (we speak She is a perfectly orthodox writer, as any- advisedly) wholly absent from Oriental or body who has read her “Two Friends” Semitic writings. The Teutonic way of must be aware. She has also written a set thinking of a woman is just the reverse, of poems of the sonnet type, entitled “Li- thus far. ber Veritatis." There is a series of tenderly Nor does the difference end here. The passionate love-poems, not on a level with characteristic points in the Teutonic or Mrs. Browning's Portuguese sonnets either Scandinavian ideal are two. First, the in the passion or the poetry, but quite real balance between the sexes is restored by and true. Their author must know some- the fact that the woman is held to be the thing of what love really is. Now, in the power by which the spiritual impregnation little book called “ Two Friends ”—which, of the man is effected; so that love is not as we have stated, is strictly orthodox - Do- only a liberal education, but, in the high ra Greenwell boldly says that Love is not to sense, a conversion, and the creation of a be found at all in the New Testament (p. moral or spiritual unity out of two in a way 171, second edition). “The silence of the which places the woman on a throne pecuNew Testament is a wonderful thing." liarly hers. Secondly, the woman is never Not at all wonderful, say we, for Love is possessed, and never patronized. “What utterly alien to the Oriental or Semitic is thy petition, Queen Esther, and what is spirit. The curious thing is that Miss thy request, and it shall be done to thee, Greenwell does not go on to remark that even to the half of my kingdom.". That is Love is also wholly wanting in the Old the Eastern or Semitic spirit. Above all, Testament. And the reason is the same. absolute possession in the sense of mastery Love, considered as passion, or the desire is essential to that spirit, and is never abto possess something beautiful; love, as sent from it. But what a difference when household friendship, with special regard we come to Scandinavian legends, even of shown to the weaker by the stronger; and the rudest times! When King Gunther love, as mere appetite (appetite, we say, has married Brunhilda, he is not a whit as distinguished from passion), you find in nearer. “Cette fière beauté,” as a French

around the subject, and there is a luminous | ridge exposes this fallacy in a curious piece haze of superstition about love overhanging called “ The Improvisatore,” which is inall the literature of imagination. It is true you cluded among his poems :now and then come across an essay in which the subject of falling in love is discussed friendship on the one hand, and from the pas

Coleridge.-- Love, as distinguished from as if it came as much within the calculable sion that too often usurps its name, on the province of life as buying a hat, and you other are told to be sure and do it wisely, because Lucius (Eliza's brother, who had just – because of reasons which might find a joined the trio, in a whisper to Coleridge). place in “ Poor Richard's Almanac." “ Last - But is not love the union of both ? night,” said a half-mad poet and painter, Coleridge (aside to Lucius).— He never “I came unexpectedly upon a fairy's fu- loved who thinks so.” neral” — and he proceeded to describe the And then follows Coleridge's own account ceremony as only a poet and a painter could. of love, of which it can only be said, that if What wonderfully good advice might be he had written it when he was younger, it given in an essay on Secing Fairies Fune- would probably have been as perfect in form rals! Be sure you never see a fairy's fune- and expression as it is inclusive in what we ral, unless, &c., &c.

might call the categories of love: There is no thoroughly sincere person, with a grain of spiritual sensibility, who Coleridge.— But above all, it supposes a does not, in his heart, rebel when Poor soul which, even in the pride and summer-tide Richard takes upon himself to preach about of life, even in the lustihood of health and love matters. What the troubadours called strength, had felt oftenest and prized highest amour-pour-amour, love for love's own sake, that which age cannot take away, and which, in is what every human creature with a soul all our lovings, is the love. above buttons goes in for. And we feel a to her heart) that seems to understand you, but

Eliza.— There is something here (pointing subtle pang of disapprobation when anything it wants the word that would make it understand “in the round heaven or in the living air"

itself. is put before love, or turned into a cause or “ Katherine.- I too seem to feel what you a justification of it. There is a legend of mean. Interpret the feeling for us. a distinguished preacher's courtship, which Coleridge.- I mean that willing sense of relates how he went down into the kitchen, the unsufficingness of the self for itself which and, addressing his maid-servant, said, predisposes a generous nature to see, in the to“ Betty, do you love the Lord Jesus Christ ? tal being of another, the supplement and com“Yes, sir," said Betty. “And, Betty,” pletion of its own,—that quiet, perpetual seekresumed the good man, "“ do you love me?" ing which the presence of the beloved object modSimilar in spirit is that letter of Governor ulates, not suspends, where the heart momently Winthrop's wife to her husband in which finds, and finding, again seeks on ;- lastly, she tells him she loves him for two reasons when ' life's changeful orb has passed the full, First, because thou lovest God; and, thus brought home and pressed, as it were, to

a confirmed faith in the nobleness of humanity, secondly, because thou lovest me." The the very bosom of hourly experience.” dullest feels that here there is a play upon words; and there is. Far better was Row- When you have read this, you feel that it is land Hill's courtship. In the first place," correct, and even affecting. But yet he wrote to the lady, “ I think I can say

" What wants that knave before God that I love your person. With

That a king should have?out this, such a union could never be happy." The quotation is from memory, but it is something is wanted, and in that something substantially correct, and we feel in a mo- everything! ment that Rowland IIill was straightforward The recent discussions about the Talmud and true, while the Puritan lady, pressed have disclosed a depth of benightedness in upon by the etiquette of the current talk of society, even among men whom you might her set, and not able to disentangle herself expect to know better, that is extremely irfrom a fallacy, was untrue to nature and to ritating, if not surprising. Surprising, inherself. This was nothing remarkable; deed, it is not; for it is only the old differmost people are untrue to nature and to ence between seeing and not seeing which themselves.

everlastingly divides men and women. All The most plausible and the most common the talent is nothing, and all the culture is of the fallacies about Love is that which nothing; do you see? is the question. To supposes it is the Friendship that Laura descend to å trivial illustration.

A resought, with something added to it, instead viewer, not very long ago, attacked a preof being, as it is, a thing sui generis. Cole-face written by Dr. Johnson, upon the hy

pothesis that it was written by Dr. Latham. | Semitic and Oriental writings; but there is It was said, and it might well have been no room in the Semitic or Oriental spirit true, that the reviewer was a learned and (even though it were shown that chivalry accomplished man. Nothing more likely; itself came from the Arabs) for love of the yet a child of seven, with the sensibility highest type known to the Western mind. which he lacked, would not have fallen into In the first place, reading writers like his error, or any error of a similar kind. Tieck and Fouqué, we become conscious of To take another illustration. There are a peculiar and inscrutable, but deeply fasmillions of people, including men of great cinating, purity of atmosphere. A purity learning and piety, who seem absolutely which is so child-like that it permits free blind to the difference between the Christ reference to topics which to the Latin or of the Latin imagination and the child-like Celtic intelligence are inclosed in company Christ of the Teutonic imagination. But with topics relating to the accidents of nuto return to Love and the Talinud. Every trition

- a never-failing sign of the non-Teuone will remember the exultation (surpris- tonic spirit. There are love passages in ing to those who are familiar with their Tieck and in Fouqué which could not be Apocrypha as well as with their Bible) with read aloud in a mixed circle in England; which certain Talmudic deliverances about there are two sentences in “Undine” (the women were received when the article of M. last of Chapter VII. and the second of Deutsch appeared in the Quarterly Review. Chapter VIII.) which are omitted in some

“What becomes now of the Teutonic or- of the English translations. But can anyigin of the household virtues ?” asked an able thing be more childlike-pure, or more near pen in the Pall Mall Gazette. Whoever has to heaven? And yet it is utterly foreign to said that the household virtues were of Teu- the Eastern or Semitic spirit. That spirit tonic origin has talked nonsense. But the always finds the woman an inferior and unquestion as to Love, between the Western clean nature. She is subjected. She is spirit and the Oriental or Semitic spirit, has the temptress. She has to be “purified." nothing to do, one way or the other, with Among the Hebrews the mother of a girl the household virtues. Let us try and see had to undergo a quarantine of twice the what really it is.

length appointed to the mother of a boy – Many of our readers probably know Miss (Levit. xii. 5, and Rev. xiv. 4). And, Dora Greenwell as the author of some ten- whatever modifications this way of looking der poetry and some thoughtful prose. at women undergoes, it is never (we speak She is a perfectly orthodox writer, as any- advisedly) wholly absent from Oriental or body who has read her “Two Friends” Semitic writings. The Teutonic way of must be aware. She has also written a set thinking of a woman is just the reverse, of poems of the sonnet type, entitled “Li- thus far. ber Veritatis," There is a series of tenderly Nor does the difference end here. The passionate love-poems, not on a level with characteristic points in the Teutonic or Dirs. Browning's Portuguese sonnets either Scandinavian ideal are two. First, the in the passion or the poetry, but quite real balance between the sexes is restored by and true. Their author must know some- the fact that the woman is held to be the thing of what love really is. Now, in the power by which the spiritual impregnation little book called “ Two Friends ”- which, of the man is effected; so that love is not as we have stated, is strictly orthodox — Do- only a liberal education, but, in the high ra Greenwell boldly says that Love is not to sense, a conversion, and the creation of a be found at all in the New Testament (p. moral or spiritual unity out of two in a way 171, second edition). “The silence of the which places the woman on a throne pecuNew Testament is a wonderful thing:" liarly hers. Secondly, the woman is never Not at all wonderful, say we, for Love is possessed, and never patronized. What utterly alien to the Oriental or Semitic is thy petition, Queen Esther, and what is spirit. The curious thing is that Miss thy request, and it shall be done to thee, Greenwell does not go on to remark that even to the half of my kingdom.". That is Love is also wholly wanting in the Old the Eastern or Semitic spirit. Above all, Testament. And the reason is the same. absolute possession in the sense of mastery Love, considered as passion, or the desire is essential to that spirit, and is never abto possess something beautiful; love, as sent from it. But what a difference when household friendship, with special regard we come to Scandinavian legends, even of shown to the weaker by the stronger; and the rudest times! When King Gunther love, as mere appetite (appetite, we say, has married Brunhilda, he is not a whit as distinguished from passion), you find in nearer. “ Cette fière beauté," as a French

man ludicrously calls her (missing the point, to place it alongside of the makeshifts and like a true Celt), teaches King Gunther a the counterfeits which pass for it in life or lesson:

in fiction. The novelists, as a rule, seem “When I thought her love to gain, she bound to have lost all power of painting, or even me as her thrall,

hinting what it is! Charlotte Brontë knew Unto a nail she bore 'me, and hung me on the something about it. So does Mr. Charles wall."

Kingsley. So does George Eliot. So does And it is only by magic that King Gunther both in life and in fiction we usually get

Mrs. Oliphant. And there are others. But finally conquers and makes his bride yield presented to us for love, mere longing — a up her girdle. These two points — the wo-thing which brings no sense of obligation man is never to be possessed —

in itself, and is therefore shoved aside for “She's not and never can be mine” the most degrading reasons. If love be all and that she is in herself (not as conse- of it, there is assuredly no reason whatever

that novelists and moralists in general make crated, but in herself) pure and divine, why the contemptible things which are aland the source of moral impregnation to lowed to interfere with it should not do so. the man, are of the essence of the Teutonic It is, in fact, not worth making novels about ; or true Western idea of love: By making certainly not worth making poems about. a moral unit of two beings, this involves not But it is sufficiently plain that the human only monogamy, but (as an ideal) perpet- heart has an ineradicable suspicion or preual monogamyIt involves, also, the high- sentiment of something better than what it est type of self-sacrifice — the finest illus- is so frequently put off with. That sometration of its action in this respect being to thing better — more than the strongest debe found in the legend of Helmfrid, told in sire, more than the strongest attachment, Fouque’s “ Thiodolf the Icelander":

and more than the most perfect household “ If yours you seek, not her delight, virtue - may be a flower that blooms only

Surely a dragon and strong tower once in a hundred years; but is the time

Guard the true lady in her bower.” come to disbelieve that it ever does bloom ? And it also involves heroism, of whatever

Or to pretend that you can pick it up in the kind, in the man :

streets, or find it by merely looking for it,

or grow it like mustard and cress? Or tó “ You love? That's high as you shall go ; deny that it is the flower which to have For 'tis as true as Gospel text,

gathered and worn is (not to put the case Not noble then is never so,,

too high) as much as to have made a lot of Neither in this world nor the next." money or invented a new pill? Mr. Tennyson has not shown the deepest heard his mistress describe the upper, mid

There was once a footman who, having possible sense of what love is, but here he is (as he would not fail to be) at one with dle, and lower classes as china, delf, and the highest idea of it, for he makes King nursemaid bring down young master for a

crockery, and being then told to bid the Arthur say:

visitor to see, called out to her, “ Hollo, “I know

Crockery, bring down little Chaney! Of no more subtle master under heaven The irony was not bad, but we cannot Than is the maiden passion for a maid,

allow crockery love to flout the love which Not only to keep down the base in man,

is porcelain ; much less the love which is But teach high thought, and amiable words, And . . . . love of truth, and all that makes a no more true that, just because we are all

opal. All the loves are affiliated; but it is

human, Zeke Hickorybole's love was like This is not quite satisfactory, and the words the love of Pericles, than it is true that the we have omitted, “ courtliness and the de- poor beetle that we tread upon in corporal sire of fame," are least satisfactory of all. sufferance feels a pang as great as when a If there is anything to make a man careless giant dies. One evening Zeke was found of " fame,” it is surely love. It is the one to have chalked on his bed's head this simthing which discloses, for once and for ever, ple rhyme:that which is real and good, and confers the turquoise that changes colour when a

“My love, she is my heart's delight,

Her name it is Miss Betsy ; lie is in the atmosphere. Now, fame is the

I'll go and see her this very night, paltriest of cheats and the worst of lies.

If Heaven and mother 'll let me." It is worth while, in these confused and confusing days, to recall the highest mean- | The next day it was discovered that Zeke ing of the word love; nor is it unnecessary had chalked up another verse:

man."

“I loved Miss Betsy - wal, I did, Coleridge; “The Mermaid," where Ben And I went there to tell her ;

Jonson, Shakespeare, and Beaumont were But, like to goose-grease, quick I slid, wont to meet; “ Dolly's Chop House," the For she'd got another feller."

resort of Goldsmith and his friends; We know an elevated character who, being “Will's," where Dryden long occupied the devoted to what he calls “grand, broad, seat of honour. And again what historical human views,” maintains that the senti- hints these same signs supply. In them we ments of Zeke Hickorybole and those of find traces of the Crusader and the Saracen, the celebrated Dante Alighieri, who also of the kings of the Tudor and Brunswick wrote a poem and missed

winning his heart's lines, of the monks and priests of a differdelight, were identical. But they differed, ent period, and many reminiscences of manas shandygaff and champagne differ. Nay, ners and customs long passed away: as shandygaff'and ambrosia differ. If Dante

Charles Lamb delighted to smoke his pipe at Alighieri had happened to catch Zeke cud- the old “ Queen’s Head,” and to quaff ale from dling Betsy, and Zeke had said, Am I the tankard presented by one Master Cranch (a not a man and a brother?” Dante would choice spirit) to a former host, and in the old have allowed the plea. But he would never oak-parlour where tradition says "the gallant have introduced Zeke into the polite society Raleigh received full souse in his face the conof the Paradiso. And as for Poor Rich- tents of a jolly black-jack from an affrighted ard's idea of love, there is reason to fear, clown, who, seeing clouds of tobacco smoke curl. from the expression of Dante's face as ing from the knight's mouth and nose, thought shown in the familiar portrait, that he would he was all on fire.” have kicked Poor Richard after perusing

“ A relic of old London is fast disappearing," his essay upon the subject.

says a journal of that city — " the • Blue Bour Inn,' or the George and Blue Boar' as it came to be called later, in Holborn. For more than

two hundred years this was one of the famous From The Examiner.

coaching-houses, where stages arriver from the

Northern and Midland counties. It is more faThe Collector. By Henry T. Tuckerman. mous still as being the place — if Lord Orrery's With an Introduction by Dr. Doran. J.C. chaplain, Morrice, may be credited — where Hotten.

Cromwell and Ireton, disguised as troopers, cut The volume with this somewhat eccentric from the saddle-flap of a messenger a letter which title contains a selection from the writings they knew to be there, from Charles the First to

, of Mr. Tuckerman, an American Essayist.

The “ Peacock," at Matlock-on-the-Derwent, Dr. Doran bas written a pleasant and learned was long the chosen resort of artists, botanists, introduction, and has taken the opportunity geologists, lawyers, and anglers ; and perhaps of illustrating the papers of his friend by at no rural English inn of modern times has many a note and comment. The subjects there been more varied and gifted society than treated are not confined to America, but are occasionally convened in this romantic district, world-wide in their application. Here are under its roof. Essays on Inns, Authors, Pictures, Doctors, The “Hotel Gibbon,” at Lausanne, suguests Lawyers, Actors, Newspapers, Preachers, to one familiar with English literature the life of and many other men and things, all written that historian, so naively described by himself, with a freedom from affectation and in a gos- and keeps alive the associations of his elaborate siping, pleasant manner, which never fails to work in the scene of its production ; and nightly fascinate. Mr. Tuckerman is especially free colloquies, that are embalmed and embodied in from the besetting vice of many American genial literature, immortalise the “ sky-blue writers, who too frequently bolster up their parlour” at Ambrose’s “ Edinburgh Tavern." style by the continual use of a bombastic Probably no inn has afforded so much and grandiloquent phraseology.

mirth and fun to all as the “ Boar's Head." The first Essay of the volume is devoted Eastcheap, with fat Jack Falstaff and buxom to “ Inns," and this, supplemented by Dr. Mrs. Quickly, the rubicund Bardolph, the Doran's historical account of the ancient witty Poins, and the careless, dissolute taverns and alehouses of London, forms an Prince Henry as its visitors. Dr. Doran ininteresting and readable paper. Mr. Tuck- forms us that a certain Will Leedes kept the erman reminds us how many classic names Boar's Head” in 1633, according to a list the old tavern signs frequently recall. The of the city taverns furnished by the tem“Black Bull” at Islington, once the mansion perance party of that time. Here “Will of Sir Walter Raleigh; the “Salutation and Leedes may have seen Shakespeare, who Cat" at Smithfield, the scene of many an had not then been dead a score of years; animated discussion between Lamb' and and we may faney mine host's guests dis

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