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Buffalo Medical Journal INDEX TO ADVERTISEMENTS

ellowS

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Manufacturers of Drugs, etc.

College Battle & Co.............

24 University of Buffalo-Dental Dept....14 Bayer

University of Buffalo-Medical Dept...14 Breitenbach Co........ Bristol-Meyers Co...

Hospitals, Sanitariums, Hotels Carnrick Co., G. W., New York.

Chalfonte, Atlantic City...............28 Daniel, John B., Inc.....

Glen Springs, Watkins, N. Y..........28 Denver Chemical Co....

Homewood Sanitarium, Guelph, Ont., Dios Chemical Co...........

cover page .......................... 2 Dugdale, Frederick ..

Marshall Sanitarium, Troy, N. Y.....28 Dixson, John B.......

......... 5

McMichael's, Dr. Sanatorium, Buffalo 28 Fairchild Bros. & Foster....Front Cover

Steuben Sanitarium, Hornell. .........28 Farwell & Rhines....

Waukesha Mhor Baths, Waukesha, Fellows ......

........18

Wis. .......
H.-O. Co...................Cover page
Katharmon Chemical Co.....
Mellier Drug Co.......

Milk, Etc.
Mulford, H. K., Co..

.....19

(Buffalo unless specified) Od Chemical Co.......... Parke, Davis & Co......... Cover page 4

Borden's Condensed Milk Co., N. Y. Peacock Chemical Co......

and Buffalo ............ Purdue Frederick Co....... Cover page 3

Wheat's Ice Cream Co.................21 Richardson Co.......... Sherman, G. H., M. D.....

Undertakers Smith, Martin H.........

(Buffalo unless specified) Southport Chemical Co...

Sauerwein, Henry Sultan Drug Co..........

Farnsworth, W. H. Tilden Co. ..........

Schlager & Son....... .......

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Instruments, Prosthetic Appliances,
Lenses, etc.

Miscellaneous
(Buffalo unless specified)

(Buffalo unless specified) Davis & Geck, Inc...

........27 Brainard, Harry, Insurance.. Electro Surgical Instrument Co.,

Connor, R. H. & Co.... Rochester

... ............ 5 Desbecker

..................27 Fox, Geo. R., Optician...........

| Samuel Newman, Tailor....... Kredo Co., Auburn, N. Y..............27 Scheuermann Co., Inc. ............... Storm, Katherine L., Philadelphia....11 | Worthington & Sill, Insurance.......

: : : :

........23

....27

Druggists

Water (Buffalo unless specified)

(Buffalo unless specified) Brooks Pharmacy .... Kreuz, Peter

.....21 J.........................27

Hudor Co. ......

Mountain Valley Water Co., N. Y....16 Automobiles and Supplies (Buffalo unless specified)

Publishers Elsenhans Battery Exchange..........27 | Albany Medical Annals. ...............23 Emery Mfg. Co., Bradford, Pa........27 Detroit Medical Journal...............21

BUFFALO MEDICAL JOURNAL

Yearly Volume 74

AUGUST, 1918

Number 1

ORIGINAL ARTICLES

The right is reserved to decline papers not dealing with practical medical and surgical subjects, and such as might offend or fail to interest readers. Contributors are solely responsible for opinions, methods of expression and revision of proof.

Adulterated and Misbranded Food*

By CHARLES D. AARON, Sc. D., M. D., F. A. C. P. Professor of Gastroenterology and Dietetics in the Detroit

College of Medicine and Surgery, Detroit, Mich.

It is admitted by both manufacturers and consumers that artificial means are absolutely unnecessary for the preservation of food. But selfishness and politics have tried for years to discredit the good work done by the Bureau of Chemistry of the Department of Agriculture designed to promote the national health. The laity should know that the use of harmful drugs makes it possible for manufacturers to convert decaying fruits and vegetables into jellies and catsups which look good and taste fairly good, but are unwholesome. They should know that manufacturers take filthy, rancid, rotten, frowy butter and “renovate" it into so-called dairy and creamery butter.

The American Association for the Promotion of Purity in Food Products has declared that chemical preservatives are not necessary for the conservation of the essential features in food products.

That adulterated food does harm, no one can deny. Alum in bread, formaldehyde in milk, salicylic acid and benzoic acid in meats, borax in cheese, coloring matter in butter, acids in smoked meats, copper in pickles, etc., are simple illustrations. The medical press throughout the United States has commented on the subject-but widely varying opinions have been expressed as to the degree of harmfulness of the *Read before the Detroit Academy of Medicine, February 26, 1918.

food preservatives. Some writers take the ground that boric and salicylic acid, even when contained in considerable quantities in foods, are much less harmful than the toxins of putrefaction which sometimes develop if the preservatives are not used. The French law on this subject regards the addition of any preservative to 'food as deleterious on the ground that any such substance must inhibit the action of the gastric and intestinal juices and thus delay digestion,

The subject, however, is a complicated one. One expert, for instance, declares that he believes the addition of large quantities of antiseptics to food is in the main deleterious, yet there are certain foods, he says, in which it is a distinct advantage. He cites catsup, which is ordinarily sold in a package of sufficient size to last a small family for several days, perhaps weeks. If no antiseptics were used in its preparation, as soon as the bottle was opened fermentation would be set up and the contents soon spoil. This condiment, he declares, is used in small quantities, and the amount of salicylic acid or other antiseptic any individual would obtain is inconsiderable. This reasonable statement of the value of antiseptics shows that no sweeping general rule can be applied in prohibiting the use of such substances. But their extensive use is admittedly harmful; in samples of butter examined, from sixty to eighty grains of boric acid to the pound have been found.

The necessity of preserving food-stuffs is more acute today than in early times, though there never was a time when it was not an urgent problem. Food is not always naturally available when needed. Not only must vegetables, fruits, and nuts be gathered, but their supply varies with the season of the year. Most foods require preparation to render them not only palatable, but even digestible; and evidently the aboriginal tribes in this latitude were under the necessity of storing summer food or doing without it at other seasons. But our difficulties increase as our necessities multiply. The great demand for “preserved” food in ancient times is evidenced by the fact that there were frequent famines; transportation was extremely slow and men were dependent upon the products of their husbandry.

Inasmuch as the succession of seasons, the intervals between harvests, and the distances from the sources of supply compel man to store and transport food products, and since these are more or less perishable, the necessity of artificially preserving these foods from decay is apparent.

Today ships must be provisioned, the camps, the army, navy and marine, the hospitals and places of detention; our allies must be supplied, and the preparation and preservation

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