Merry-mount: A Romance of the Massachusetts Colony, Volumes 1-2

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James Munroe, 1849

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Page 53 - I am poured out like water, and all my bones are out of joint. My heart is like wax; it is melted in the midst of my bowels.
Page 1 - O, sir, if we could but see the shape of our dear mother England, as poets are wont to give a personal form to what they please, how would she appear, think ye, but in a mourning weed, with ashes upon her head, and" tears abundantly flowing from her eyes, to behold so many of her children exposed at once, and thrust from things of dearest necessity, because their conscience could not assent to things which the bishops thought indifferent ? What more binding than conscience ? What more free than indifferency?
Page 78 - Trimountain, or Tremont, which it soon afterwards received. The vast conical shadows were projected eastwardly, as the hermit, with his back to the declining sun, looked out upon the sea. The bay was spread out at his feet in a broad semicircle, with its extreme headlands vanishing in the hazy distance, while beyond rolled the vast expanse of ocean, with no spot of habitable earth beyond those outermost barriers, and that far distant fatherland, which the exile had left forever.
Page 79 - The bay, secluded within its forest-crowned hills, decorated with its necklace of emerald islands, with its dark blue waters gilded with the rays of the western sun, and its shadowy forests of unknown antiquity, expanding into infinite depths around, was an image of fresh and virgin beauty, a fitting type of a new world, unadorned by art, unploughed by industry, unscathed by war, wearing none of the thousand priceless jewels of civilization, and unpolluted by its thousand crimes, — springing, as...
Page 111 - And Moab said unto the elders of Midian, Now shall this company lick up all that are round about us, as the ox licketh up the grass of the field.
Page 252 - And causd him send forth Triton with the sound Of Trumpet lowd, at which the Seas were found So full of Protean formes that the bold shore Presented Scilla a new parramore So strongc as Sampson and so patient 30 As Job himselfe, directed thus, by fate, To comfort Scilla so unfortunate.
Page 77 - ... the north, a third craggy peak presented its bold and elevated front to the ocean. Thus the whole peninsula was made up of three lofty crags. It was from this triple conformation of the promontory of Shawmut, that was derived the appellation of Trimountain, or Tremont, which it soon afterwards received. " The vast conical shadows were projected eastwardly, as the hermit, with his back to the declining sun, looked out upon the sea. " The bay was spread out at his feet in a broad semicircle, with...
Page 78 - ... mystic veil. The bay presented a spectacle of great beauty. It was not that the outlines of the coast around it were broken into those jagged and cloud-like masses, — that picturesque and startling scenery where precipitous crag, infinite abyss, and roaring surge unite to awaken stern and sublime emotions; on the contrary, the gentle loveliness of this transatlantic scene inspired a soothing melancholy more congenial to the contemplative character of its solitary occupant. The bay, secluded...
Page 79 - ... of its Creator. On the left, as the pilgrim sat with his face to the east, the outlines of the coast were comparatively low, but broken into gentle and pleasing forms. Immediately at his feet lay a larger island, in extent nearly equal to the peninsula of Shawmut, covered with mighty forest-trees, and at that day untenanted by a human being, although but a short time afterwards it became the residence of a distinguished pioneer. Outside this bulwark a chain of thickly wooded islets stretched...
Page 77 - A solitary figure sat upon the summit of Shawmut. He was a man of about thirty years of age, somewhat above the middle height, slender in form, with a pale, thoughtful face. He wore a confused, dark-colored, half-canonical dress, with a gray, broadleaved hat strung with shells, like an ancient palmer's, and slouched back from his pensive brow, around which his prematurely gray hair fell in heavy curls, far down upon his neck. He had a wallet at his side, a hammer in his girdle, and a long staff in...

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