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The art of a thing is, first, its aim, and next, its manner of accomplishment.

C. C. N. BOVEE-Summaries of Thought. Art and Artists.

Nature is not at variance with art, nor art with nature; they being both the servants of his providence. Art is the perfection of

nature. Were the world now as it was the sixth day, there were yet a chaos. Nature hath made one world, and art another. In brief, all things are artificial; for nature is the art of God.

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The conscious utterance of thought by speech or action, to any end, is art.

f. EMERSON-Society and Solitude. Art. The power depends on the depth of the artist's insight of that object he contemplates.

g.

EMERSON-Essay on Art.

The perfection of an art consists in the employment of a comprehensive system of laws, commensurate to every purpose within its scope, but concealed from the eye of the spectator; and in the production of effects that seem to flow forth spontaneously, as though uncontrolled by their influence, and which are equally excellent, whether regarded individually, or in reference to the proposed result.

h. GOOD-The Book of Nature. Series I. Lecture IX.

There are two kinds of artists in this world; those that work because the spirit is in them, and they cannot be silent if they would, and those that speak from a conscientious desire to make apparent to others the beauty that has awakened their own admiration.

i ANNA KATHARINE GREEN-The Sword of Damocles. Bk. I. Ch. V.

The temple of art is built of words. Painting and sculpture and music are but the blazon of its windows, borrowing all their significance from the light, and suggestive only of the temple's uses.

j. HOLLAND-Plain Talks on Familiar Subjects. Art and Life.

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The counterfeit and counterpart
Of Nature reproduced in art.

0. LONGFELLOW-Kéramos. Line 380. Art in fact is the effort of man to express the ideas which Nature suggests to him of a power above Nature, whether that power be within the recesses of his own being, or in the Great First Cause of which Nature, like himself, is but the effect.

p. BULWER LYTTON-Caxtoniana. On the Moral Effect of Writers.

Artists may produce excellent designs, but they will avail little, unless the taste of the public is sufficiently cultivated to appreciate them, GEORGE C. MASON-Art Manufactures

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Ch. XIX.

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To weave a garland for the rose,
And think thus crown'd 'twould lovelier be,
Were far less vain than to suppose
That silks and gems add grace to thee.
k. MOORE-Songs from the Greek
Anthology. To Weave a Garland.

"Tis not a lip, or eye, we beauty call,
But the joint force and full result of all.

1. POPE-Essay. On Criticism. Pt. II. Line 45.

For when with beauty we can virtue join, We paint the semblance of a point divine. PRIOR TO the Countess of Oxford.

m.

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Much Ado About Nothing. Act II.
Sc.

Beauty is bought by judgment of the eye, Not utter'd by base sale of chapmen's tongues.

Love's Labour's Lost. Act II.

Sc.

t. Beauty is but a vain and doubtful good; A shining gloss that vadeth suddenly; A flower that dies when first it 'gins to bud A brittle glass that's broken presently; A doubtful good, a gloss, a glass, a flower,

Lost, vaded, broken, dead within an
hour.

And as goods lost are seld or never found,
As vaded gloss no rubbing will refresh,
As flowers dead lie wither'd on the ground
As broken glass no cement can redress,

So beauty blemish'd once's forever lost
In spite of physic, painting, pain, an

cost.

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BEAUTY.

Of Nature's gifts thou may'st with lilies boast, And with the half-blown rose.

a. King John. Act III. Sc. 1.

O, she doth teach the torches to burn bright!
Her beauty hangs upon the cheek of night,
As a rich jewel in an Ethiop's ear:

Beauty too rich for use, for earth too dear!
ს. Romeo and Juliet. Act I. Sc. 5.
Say that she frown; I'll say she looks as clear
As morning roses newly wash'd with dew.
C. Taming of the Shrew. Act II. Sc. 1.
See where she comes, apparell'd like the
Spring.

d. Pericles. Act. I. Sc. 1.

There's nothing ill can dwell in such a temple:
If the ill spirit have so fair a house,
Good things will strive to dwell with't.
k. Tempest. Act I. Sc. 2.

'Tis beauty truly blent, whose red and white, Nature's own sweet and cunning hand laid on. j. Twelfth Night. Act 1. Sc. 5.

I pray thee, O God, that I may be beautiful within.

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Act III. She stood a sight to make an old man young. J. TENNYSON-The Gardener's Daughter. Loveliness

Needs not the foreign aid of ornament,
But is, when unadorn'd, adorn'd the most.
k. THOMSON The Seasons. Autumn.

Line 204. Thoughtless of beauty, she was beauty's self. 1. THOMSON--The Seasons. Autumn. Line 209.

Beauty with a bloodless conquest, finds A welcome sov'reignty in rudest minds. m. WALLER Upon His Majesty's Repairing of St. Paul's. And beauty born of murmuring sound. 1. WORDSWORTH-Three Years she Grew in Sun and Shower.

What's female beauty but an air divine Through which the mind's all-gentle graces shine.

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Henry VI. Pt. III. Act I. Sc. 4. Well, whiles I am a beggar, I will rail, And say, there is no sin but to be rich; And being rich, my virtue then shall be, To say,--there is no vice but beggary. y. King John. Act II. Sc. 2.

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ISAAC DE BENSERADE-Translated by Dr. Johnson.

You'll be damn'd if you do,

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