Transactions of the Essex Agricultural Society from ...

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Press of Foote & Brown, 1876

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Page 104 - EXCEPT the LORD build the house, they labour in vain that build it : except the LORD keep the city, the watchman waketh but in vain.
Page 21 - It may not be our lot to wield The sickle in the ripened field ; Nor ours to hear, on summer eves, The reaper's song among the sheaves ; Yet where our duty's task is wrought In unison with God's great thought, The near and future blend in one, And whatsoe'er is willed is done...
Page 68 - The process of ripening on the tree, which is the natural one, seems to act upon the fruit for the benefit of the seed, as it tends to the formation of woody fibre and farina. When the fruit is removed from the tree, at the very commencement of ripening, and placed in a still atmosphere, the natural process seems to be counteracted, and sugar and juice are elaborated instead of fibre and farina. Thus, pears which become mealy and rot at the core when left on the tree to ripen, become juicy, melting,...
Page 23 - There were many persons." he said, " on all sides of politics, who thought that a considerable number of small proprietors would be a great advantage, but, with the imperfect consideration which he had been able to give to the subject, he had never laid down the doctrine that the existing tenure of land in this country (England) should be altered, or that anything should be done to encourage any other tenure.
Page 14 - ... enterprise and ambition. To the practical work of the agricultural community here, wide-spread disaster, moreover, is unknown. The local damage of a drought or a flood is not indeed unusual ; but the extent of our territory is such, the diversity of our soil and climate is so great, that the disasters seem to be circumscribed and accidental, while the prosperity is wide-spread and constant. With landed possessions which are obliged to bear the burdens of heavy taxation, with wages of labor vastly...
Page 19 - ... commend as a guide to the civilized world. It is true they are citizens of a republic, and are owners of the soil on which they live; but it is a republic without the traditions of freedom, a soil divided among the.m by violence before they had reached the point of citizenship. And I think the most that can be said of their civil organization is that their approach to republican government has been largely through their system of landholding, more largely than through any lessons taught them...
Page 15 - ... of life are so small and whose duties are so few that the former seem intolerable and the latter seem insignificant and trivial. The skill of the American farmer, supplied as he is with the most ingenious and graceful and effective machinery, has become an object of admiration and imitation. The well-organized home of the American farmer is looked upon as a model. The place filled in the community by the American farmer is considered so important and honorable that other nations inquire how it...
Page 19 - France differs so entirely from our own thit she furnishes no such example of popular intelligence and personal independence as is found in the United States. There the home known to the American farmer is not found. The American farm-house is almost unknown. The peasantry gather for the night into crowded towns away from their lands, and go forth by day to till their few outlying acres. The demands of the state upon them are not large. They are seldom overtaxed, except in time of war. They are tempted...
Page 154 - ... whom they may appoint to fill the office until the next meeting of the Society, when there shall be a new choice. ARTICLE XII.
Page 14 - American system of land-holding, for instance, is the foundation of great popular content, and accompanied as it is by great social and civil opportunities, surrounded as it is by the free institutions of our land, attended as it is by the school-house and the meeting-house, and by the constant call to public service, which leaves but few exempt among us, it constitutes the foundation on which rest great mental activity, great dignity of character, great enterprise and ambition. To the practical...

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