A Compilation of the Messages and Speeches of Theodore Roosevelt, 1901-1905, Volume 1

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Bureau of National Literature and Art, 1906

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Page 569 - ... with my life and the apprehension of danger natural to that solicitude, urge me, on an occasion like the present, to offer to your solemn contemplation and to recommend to your frequent review, some sentiments, which are the result of much reflection of no inconsiderable observation and which appear to me all-important to the permanency of your felicity as a people.
Page 481 - Who shall ascend into the hill of the Lord? or who shall stand in his holy place? He that hath clean hands, and a pure heart; who hath not lifted up his soul unto vanity, nor swom deceitfully.
Page 571 - Promote, then, as an object of primary importance, institutions for the general diffusion of knowledge. In proportion as the structure of a government gives force to public opinion, it is essential that public opinion should be enlightened.
Page 669 - We can admire the heroic valor, the sincerity, the self-devotion shown alike by the men who wore the blue and the men who wore the gray; and...
Page 660 - On the one hand, this country would certainly decline to go to war to prevent a foreign government from collecting a just debt; on the other hand, it is very inadvisable to permit any foreign power to take possession, even temporarily, of the...
Page 660 - If a republic to the south of us commits a tort against a foreign nation such as an outrage against a citizen of that nation, then the Monroe Doctrine does not force us to interfere to prevent punishment of the tort, save to see that the punishment does not assume the form of territorial occupation in any shape.
Page 220 - We do not guarantee any state against punishment if it misconducts itself, provided that punishment does not take the form of the acquisition of territory by any non-American power.
Page 219 - In other words, the Monroe Doctrine is a declaration that there must be no territorial aggrandizement by any nonAmerican power at the expense of any American power on American soil.
Page 261 - In the end an admirable law was passed "to promote the safety of employees and travelers upon railroads by compelling common carriers engaged in inter-state commerce to equip their cars with automatic couplers and continuous brakes and their locomotives with driving-wheel brakes.
Page 261 - An act to promote the safety of employees and travelers upon railroads by compelling common carriers engaged in interstate commerce to equip their cars with automatic couplers and continuous brakes, and their locomotives with drivingwheel brakes, and for other purposes...

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