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JOHN BULL THINKS IT RIGHT TO REMIND TURKEY THAT SHE IS IN DIFFICULTIES WITH ARMENIA.

From Kladderadatsch (Berlin).

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ALL IN THE SAME BOAT. THE THREE PROVINCES TO ULSTER : “We are all in the same boat, and we must pull together to get to LAND." ULSTER : "Here goes ; I'll take an oar this time."

From the Weskly Freeman (Dublin).

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THE WORLD'S EVENT FOR 1895 THE COTTON STATES AND INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION.

BY CLARK HOWELL, EDITOR OF THE ATLANTA “CONSTITUTION.”

IMUN

Atlanta is a peculiar city, and its chief characteristic has ever been the ease and readiness with which it has surmounted apparently insurmountable obstacles in the marvelous development of the city. Her people are never more contented than when working for Atlanta, and however extreme or violent may become the heat of factional agitation there has never been a time when every element of her citizenship has not been ready to bury its difference in its willingness to meet on common ground in anything that looked to the development of the city, or the material advancement of her welfare.

SA

MAIN ENTRANCE TO THE EXPOSITION BUILDING

THE most conspicuous international attraction of

the current year will be the Cotton States and International Exposition, to be held in Atlanta this fall, beginning the middle of September and continuing until the first of January, 1896.

It is remarkable to contemplate that the movement which will culminate in the splendid success of this international enterprise was not suggested until but little more than a year ago—to be accurate, the proposition was first made during the Christmas holidays which ushered out 1893, and it was not until the first week of the year just passed that the business men of Atlanta had taken the matter under formal consideration.

The enterprise originated with Col. William A. Hemphill, business manager of the Atlanta Constitution. Always fruitful in resources, and with a well developed capacity for meeting business emergencies, Col. Hemphill, brooding over the general depression which clouded the exit of the old year, and not dreaming that the new year, 1894, had in store even more serious business and industrial travail than its unhappy predecessor, devoted his Christmas holidays of a year ago to the development of the plan, then confided only to himself, for the rehabilitation at least of Atlanta's energy, and it was to the writer that he first unfolded the scheme. To make a long story short, he proposed an exposition of the resources of the Southern states which, at the great World's Fair, just concluded in Chicago, had occupied a position of trivial consideration, not through fault of the management of the fair, but because the states of the South, encumbered by constitutional limitations, or not appreciating in advance the magnitude of the Chicago enterprise, had failed to take advantage of the splendid opportunity presented them of displaying to the world their limitless resources. It is true a few of the Southern States were represented, but even with them the phenomenal scope of the World's Fair, with its endless variety of exhibits from all parts of the earth, minimized their effort and rendered it unsatisfactory.

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BIRD'S-EYE VIEW OF THE COTTON STATES AND INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION GROUNDS.-LOOKING NORTHEAST.

merce been opened to their accustomed activity, the Atlanta Exposition would never have been considered -certainly not until much more time had elapsed since the closing of the World's Fair, which had been the universal triumph of human ingenuity as developed on the line of expositions, and which necessarily would overshadow and minimize any similar effort by this, or any other country, for years to come.

But with dauntless energy Atlanta determined to erect a break-water against the tide of business depression—to apply a tonic, as it were, which would keep its business active and stimulate its physical system, however much may be the distress of other cities and other sections. Col. Hemphill's scheme, given to the writer, was transferred by him to the editorial columns of the Constitution, and the first week in 1891 saw the most representative gathering of Atlanta business men ever assembled in the Chamber of Commerce. The movement immediately materialized, a committee of representative business men was appointed to formulate the plan, and in the office of Mr. S. M. Inman, the head of the greatest cotton house in the world, that committee christened the undertaking the Cotton States and International Exposition, fixed the date for throwing open the gates at the 18th of September, 1895, and declared that the keynote of the undertaking would be the establishment of closer trade relations between the United States and the South, Central and Latin American Republics, thus vastly amplifying Col. Hemphill's conception.

Temporary organization was effected, a charter obtained, and the people of Atlanta were asked to make good their manifestations of approval of the enterprise by responding to a call for a popular subscription of $200,000, which they did in less than ten days—an achievement unparalleled in the spontaneity of response and which could probably not have been duplicated by any other city of its size in this or any other country.

While the enterprise was in its formative state a special commissioner was sent to every leading city in the United States to confer with the chambers of commerce and other trade organizations for the purpose of securing their approval of the effort Atlanta had launched to open the channels of commerce between the United States and South America. From everywhere came words of encouragement and approval. The representative business organizations of almost every prominent city in the United States passed resolutions of hearty sympathy, and all seemed to be particularly impressed with the merit of the suggestion that the time was ripe for reaching out for Central and South American business, four-fifths of which is now controlled by Europe, while every consideration demands that the United States should at least command its just proportion of the vast commerce of the sister countries lying to the south of us.

New Orleans, Galveston, St. Louis, Cincinnati, Chicago, Denver, Nashville, Pittsburgh, Philadelphia, New York, Boston, Baltimore, one after an

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