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the paper tag was not even burned through, while, in places, the white surface was not discolored, as is shown by the accompanying photograph. Near the center the surface of the tag was somewhat charred, but this was actually the extent of the damage. The safe contained a number of paper documents, which were almost entirely destroyed by

Improved Dyeing Machine
A RECENT INTENTION in machin-

ery used in the dyeing of fabrics, cannot fail to interest a great industry in the United States, so pronounced are its advantages over the present system. The inventor is Mr. Carl Gruschwitz, of Zittau ; and the invention applies to that part of dyeing machinery called the "jigger," through which the goods pass at full width in the process of dyeing. The difference from the present method is that the dye is mixed in the vat itself, thereby doing away with the upper construction of reservoirs for that purpose in the present system. The dye is then distributed with force against the cloth by atomizers, instead of the goods passing through a body of liquid.

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A Freak Fire Effect THE 'HE USE of miniature savings banks has become so extensive that they are

MINIATURE SAVINGS Bank, now manufactured in a very substantial

Showing Peculiar Effects of Fire. manner, many of them being composed of heavy steel. The one shown in the ac the heat; and why the tag did not burn companying picture is made of this metal, is a mystery. and recently passed through an ordeal Apparently the heat was of sufficient which shows that these little banks can intensity to reduce the paper contents of withstand very high temperatures. It the safe to ashes; but for some unknown was locked up in a safe in a building reason the paper attachments of the little which was completely destroyed by the bank were injured only to the extent recent fire in Baltimore. The safe itself described. lay among burning embers and hot ashes for three days before it was taken out of the ruins. After it had been cooled and

The Traveling Stairway the doors opened, it was found that the IT IS NO LONGER NECESSARY tɔ heat had blistered the outside of the little climb stairways or to take the ordinary bank, peeling off the enamel in places, elevator in going from one floor to anand discoloring the surface. The lock, other. The moving staircase is an inhowever, was uninjured; and when the vention now in use in many large stores bank was opened, the pennies and nickels and other buildings. It is really an init contained were found to be in as good clined floor, moving upon a series of condition as when placed in it.

small wheels, which, in turn, are operated The most remarkable feature of it all, by larger ones that might be called drivhowever, was a freak of the fire. At ing wheels. The surface of the moving tached to the bank was a circular tag floor fits to the surface of the horizontal made of stiff paper, containing its num floor so closely that there is no danger of ber and the name of the owner of the a person catching his feet between the coin it contained. Although, as already movable and stationary sections. Any stated, the heat was so great that the one who wishes to go from the ground outside of the bank was badly damaged, story to the one above, simply walks

upon the incline, and, in less than a Compressed air to operate the engine minute, is carried to his destination. He and saw can be obtained by using a commay remain still on the incline, or walk pressor driven by steam, belt, gasoline, along it as he pleases. The motion is so or electricity, or by using an ordinary uniform that there is no vibration or locomotive air pump attached to the jarring; and so rapidly do the stairs op- boiler of any logging or portable engine. erate that one of the devices in New York The pneumatic engine is capable of City will carry 2,000 passengers in an making from 125 to 150 strokes per minhour to a height of about twenty feet. ute, depending upon the pressure of air

The driving wheels, around which the used. At 60 pounds' pressure it will endless floor moves, are usually connected develop 27/2 horse-power.

develop 272 horse-power. The engine, by belting to an electric motor or steam constructed almost entirely of brass and engine. About 27/2 horse-power are re steel tubing, weighs 50 pounds. It is quired to carry 600 passengers an hour; claimed for the valve motion—which is

of an entirely new design—that it has no complicated valves or parts to get out of order, and that it is very simple and easy of adjustment. The frame is made of machine steel and wood, and, though light in weight, is strong and durable.

It is claimed by the makers that one man with one of these machines can easily cut ten cords of 2-foot wood per day, or 50,000 feet in logs, reducing the present labor expense at least fifty per cent.

The McCloud River Lumber Company have given the machine a thorough test and it has proved very satisfactory.

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The Acousticon
WITH

ITH THE HELP of this ingenious

device—the invention of Mr. Miller R. Hutchison, of New York City—it is

claimed that any deaf person, save one TRAVELING STAIRWAY.

whose auditory nerve is paralyzed, can and double this amount to carry 2,000

be made to hear. Fortunately, even passengers. Calculations based on actual

among deaf mutes, there are comparexperience show that by the use of elec- atively few who are absolutely shut out tric motors, it costs but seven cents to

from the reach—at least of some faint

echo—of sound waves from the outer carry 1,000 people per hour.

world. Deafness is in many cases only

partial, being due to lack of, or defectSawing by Compressed Air

iveness in, subsidiary parts of the ear

mechanism, while the essential parts may A

NEW INVENTION which has re be present in perfect working order. In cently appeared in the West, in

such cases, what is needed is not an introduces the use of compressed air for strument that will merely amplify sounds, operating a saw. This appliance, known but one that will do the work of the as the “Redfield pneumatic engine and missing or defective organic parts. It frame,” is adapted for operating drag is on this principle that the "acousticon” saws, for cutting logs, cord wood, heavy is based. The instrument performs the timber, and for general use in timber function of the middle ear. In this airand log camps, displacing the hand filled cavity, as every student of physipower equipment.

ology knows, are located the "ossicies"

three small bones constituting a chain or vided, in which both mouthpiece and earbridge connecting the inner with the piece are equipped with a nosepiece for outer ear, and over which are transmitted gathering nasal sounds. to the fluid-surrounded extremities of the A special modification of the acousauditory nerve within the inner ear the ticon is a portable outfit for collecting vibrations caused by the sound waves as they roll in from the outer air and dash themselves up against the tympanum or ear drum. This chamber, owing to its being connected with the nasal passage through the Eustachian tube, is the portion of the ear most liable to affection by catarrh and other disorders, and hence the portion most often directly concerned in cases of deafness.

The acousticon may be described as a combined telephone and microphone. Its essential feature is a cup-shaped body, into the open end of which the soun: waves enter, the inner end of the cup

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PORTABLE ACOUSTICON, No. 1.

sounds in concert halls and theaters. The opera outfit consists of a double soundreceiving instrument contained within a small box. With the aid of this device, a young woman of twenty-two, who had lost sight and hearing at the age of six years, was able to enjoy the music at an opera in New York City, just as if she had never been deprived of any of her faculties.

A special desk outfit is also manufactured.

ACOUSTICON OPERA OUTFIT IN USE.

Typewriting by Electricity reflecting and concentrating them upon a WILLIAM E. ROBERTS, of Newvibrating diaphragm. A small but power

ark, N. J., has invented a way to ful storage battery, capable of being car operate a typewriter by means of elecried in the pocket, is part of the mechan- tricity. It has always been necessary to ism; and it is claimed that there is no depress the keys of a machine sufficiently interference of reflected sound waves,

to throw the type-bar against the inking such as often gives trouble in the case of ribbon and leave its impression on the ear tubes, trumpets, and horns. The paper, this action releasing a universal articulation of words is made most dis- bar, which allows the carriage to move tinct, so that even a faint whisper is forward one space as each letter is heard by the deaf mute.

printed. This can now be done by the In order to enable the deaf person to aid of the electric current. Each rod is eliminate from his attention certain connected with a little electro-magnet, sounds, and to concentrate his mind upon and, as soon as the current enters any others, a special instruction outfit is pro- coil, its corresponding rod is thrown for

re

ward, just far enough to hook the lower Bermudas, extending clear to our coasts, end of it beneath the edge of the central it is low in the waters of Greenland and disc. Just as this connection is made, the West Indies. The theory is that the passage of the electric current when the tide is high in this large Berthrough another electro-magnet de muda basin, its higher waters must gravipresses the disc, pulling the rod down, tate toward the contiguous lower waters. and striking the type-face on the paper In like manner, where tlic tide is high in as though it were done by the depression the Greenland and West Indies basins, of a key with the finger.

it is low in the Bermuda basin, and their To form the connection between the high waters gravitate simultaneously toindividual magnets and the operating ward Bermuda's low level; thus high mechanism, the writer wears a set of me levels and low levels on the ocean surface tallic thimbles on the finger, which are constantly succeed one another, and the wired to the source of the electric cur tidal phenomena are produced. rent. The instant connection is made with one of the metallic plates on the keyboard, the current passes through the Spider Disables Fire-Alarm System plate into the corresponding magnet, and thence to the disc in the center of the THE ENTIRE FIRE-ALARM SYSmachine.

TEM of Bayonne, N. J., was cently disabled by a single spider. The insect was found in the transmitter room,

where all the wires converge into a netFifth Wheel Wagon-Gear

work. Henry D. Kernaghan, who has THEODORE SANDSTROM, of Con charge of the alarm system, made the

nersville, Indiana, has invented a discovery. He said: wagon-gearing with two fifth-wheels,

“Late at night one tap was struck. I got permitting very short turns of the vehicle,

out of bed and went all over the five circuits, and preventing it from being overturned but failed to find the cause of the trouble. The in case of a runaway or accident. One of system was plainly out of order, and I was

at a loss to know why. I finally turned my these is in the usual place on the front attention to the inside, and found every inaxle; and the other is on the rear axle, dicator in the department in perfect running with a tooth-gear connection, so that order. I went to the City Hall and looked when the front wheels are turned, the

into the battery room. Tests proved every

thing O. K. there. I then went to the transrear ones will be inclined in the opposite

mitter room and looked carefully over every direction.

part. To my astonishment the cause of all my trouble lay before me. It was nothing more nor less than a big, black, hairy spider.

It was dead and hanging to the wires in such New Theory of Tides

a manner that its body short-circuited the

whole system. The blamed thing had evidently R. FREDERICK BROWNLIE, in

mistaken the network of wires for a new sort the Bulletin of the American Geo of web, and was killed while doing a tightgraphical Society, discredits the part as

wire act over it.” signed to the moon as a "tide lifter." lle argues that the tide is instantaneous

Great Salt Lake Disappearing over many degrees of longitude, while the moon takes hours to travel the same

GRI

REAT SALT LAKE, America's listance. The new theory relies upon mysterious Dead Sea, will in the gravitation to unlock the tidal mystery. relatively near future be only a memory. It is contended that the form of equi- The rapidity with which this strange librium can never be attained by the body of water is disappearing furnishes ocean ; that tides are due to different a new theme for students of geology. levels in contiguous masses of water, one Nothing like it has ever been known bemass standing at high level immediately fore, except in the case of sudden and contiguous to another at low level. It is violent seismic disturbances. Physical well known, for example, that when the transformations of the earth's surface tide is high in a vast area around the generally require many centuries to show

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discernible evidence of the change. This be made from the wire gauze; and in
one in western America may change the these the victims of the malarial mo-
geographies that the next generation will squito will be confined, and kept under
study. Twenty-five years is by some es constant treatment until the malarial
timated as the time within which the lake parasite is removed from the blood. Then
will have vanished. This calculation is malarial mosquitoes, being unable to bite
based on the cubic contents of the lake at anybody previously infected, will become
the present time as compared with 1886, harmless.
when the first adequate measurements
on which to base an estimate were made.
An examination of the surface level of

Photo by Nature's Flashlight
the lake has shown a net fall of 11 12
feet in the last sixteen years, and of three A REMARKABLE PHOTOGRAPH
feet in the last three years. The deepest

taken by lightning has been obtained part of Great Salt Lake contains only

by a Japanese boy in San Francisco. 40 feet of water. At the present rate of

The picture is regarded as an exceptional fall of one foot a year, the lake is bound curiosity on the Pacific coast, where to be dry within forty years at the outside.

flashes of lightning are extremels rare But statistics show that the rate of fall

and thunder is seldom heard. The view is rapidly increasing, and of course the lake grows narrower as the water diminishes.

To Brigham Young may be traced the responsibility for the prospective loss of one of America's strangest wonders. He was the first irrigator in the West, and irrigation has worked the doom of Great Salt Lake. The drawing off of the waters was begun by Brigham Young in the forties. In 1880 the work he had begun was extended on a large scale, and, with its increased importance, the lowering of the lake level was most rapid.

!

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By Nature's Own FLASHLIGHT,

Photograph of Cliff House, San Francisco, Cal., taken Extermination of Mosquitoes in

during electric storm at midnight. Panama

is of the Cliff House, the imposing structTHE LARGEST ORDER for mos

ure which stands sentinel over the Golden quito netting ever given is soon to

Gate. The lightning here served the purbe made by the Panama Canal Commission on the recommendation of General

pose of a flashlight, only to far better Davis, Governor-General of the Ameri

alvantage. The photographer stood with can Panama Canal zone, as a means of

his camera open while the storm raged, protecting the houses and hospitals in

and during a vivid flash of lightning at the district from the disease-spreading midnight this picture was obtained. He

waited hours for the chance, but his
insect. The order calls for 100,000 yards
of wire gauze. This is to be used to shut patience was rewarded with marvelous

results,
out the mosquito, where possible, while
the breeding places are being de-
stroyed so as to exterminate the pests.
Mosquito brigades are to be organized in

The Screw-Driver's Successor
the canal villages under the direction of THE SCREW-DRIVER, one of the
Colonel Gorgas. The object of the work, oldest of tools, whose place it has
which is based on the success at Havana, been thought impossible ever to fill, has
is to free the native population from ma met a very formidable rival that may
larial infection. Screened hospitals will more or less completely supplant it in use

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