The Fourth Reader: For the Use of Schools : with an Introductory Treatise on Reading and the Training of the Vocal Organs

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Brewer and Tileston, 1863 - 240 pages
 

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Page 30 - And when they had platted a crown of thorns, they put it upon his head, and a reed in his right hand ; and they bowed the knee before him, and mocked him, saying, Hail, king of the Jews ! And they spit upon him, and took the reed, and smote him on the head.
Page 239 - Not as the conqueror comes, They, the true-hearted, came; Not with the roll of the stirring drums, And the trumpet that sings of fame; Not as the flying come, In silence and in fear; They shook the depths of the desert gloom With their hymns of lofty cheer.
Page 31 - In thoughts from the visions of the night, when deep sleep falleth on men, fear came upon me, and trembling, which made all my bones to shake. Then a spirit passed before my face ; the hair of my flesh stood up...
Page 239 - The breaking waves dashed high On a stern and rock-bound coast, And the woods against a stormy sky Their giant branches tossed; And the heavy night hung dark The hills and waters o'er, When a band of exiles moored their bark On the wild New England shore.
Page 134 - Yea, the sparrow hath found an house, and the swallow a nest for herself, where she may lay her young, even thine altars, O Lord of hosts, my King, and my God.
Page 240 - What sought they thus afar? Bright jewels of the mine? The wealth of seas, the spoils of war? — They sought a faith's pure shrine. Ay, call it holy ground, — The soil where first they trod! They have left unstained what there they found — Freedom to worship God ! Felicia Hemans.
Page 31 - t. It breaks my chain ! I held some slack allegiance till this hour ; But now my sword 's my own. Smile on, my Lords ! I scorn to count what feelings, withered hopes, Strong provocations, bitter, burning wrongs, I have within my heart's hot cells shut up, To leave you in your lazy dignities. But...
Page 141 - And everybody praised the Duke Who this great fight did win." " But what good came of it at last ? " Quoth little Peterkin. " Why, that I cannot tell," said he,
Page 81 - Ring out false pride in place and blood, The civic slander and the spite ; Ring in the love of truth and right, Ring in the common love of good. Ring out old shapes of foul disease ; Ring out the narrowing lust of gold ; Ring out the thousand wars of old, Ring in the thousand years of peace. Ring in the valiant man and free, The larger heart, the kindlier hand ; Ring out the darkness of the land, Ring in the Christ that is to be.
Page 215 - He took thee in his arms, and in pity brought thee home: A blessed day for thee ! then whither wouldst thou roam ? A faithful nurse thou hast ; the dam that did thee yean Upon the mountain-tops no kinder could have been.

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