Helps for Daily Living

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G. H. Ellis, 1889 - 150 pages

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Page 50 - There is a pleasure in the pathless woods, There is a rapture on the lonely shore. There is society where none intrudes, By the deep sea, and music in its roar; I love not man the less, but nature more...
Page 135 - One by one thy duties wait thee, Let thy whole strength go to each ; Let no future dreams elate thee, Learn thou first what these can teach.
Page 130 - Let us do our work as well, Both the unseen and the seen ; Make the house, where Gods may dwell, Beautiful, entire, and clean. Else our lives are incomplete, Standing in these walls of Time, Broken stairways, where the feet Stumble as they seek to climb. Build to-day, then, strong and sure, With a firm and ample base ; And ascending and secure Shall to-morrow find its place.
Page 104 - Little thinks, in the field, yon red-cloaked clown Of thee from the hill-top looking down; The heifer that lows in the upland farm, Far-heard, lows not thine ear to charm; The sexton, tolling his bell at noon, Deems not that great Napoleon Stops his horse, and lists with delight, Whilst his files sweep round yon Alpine height; Nor knowest thou what argument Thy life to thy neighbor's creed has lent.
Page 90 - This I beheld, or dreamed it in a dream: — There spread a cloud of dust along a plain; And underneath the cloud, or in it, raged A furious battle, and men yelled, and swords Shocked upon swords and shields. A prince's banner Wavered, then staggered backward, hemmed by foes. A craven hung above the battle's edge. And thought, "Had I a sword of keener steel — That blue blade that the king's son bears, — but this Blunt thing — !" he snapt and flung it from his hand.
Page 90 - Had I a sword of keener steel — That blue blade that the king's son bears, — but this Blunt thing — ! " he snapt and flung -it from his hand, And lowering crept away and left the field. Then came the king's son, wounded, sore bestead, And weaponless, and saw the broken sword, Hilt-buried in the dry and trodden sand, And ran and snatched it, and with battleshout Lifted afresh he hewed his enemy down, And saved a great cause that heroic day.
Page 130 - The heights by great men reached and kept, Were not attained by sudden flight, But they, while their companions slept, Were toiling upward in the night.
Page 145 - What if some morning, when the stars were paling, And the dawn whitened, and the east was clear, Strange peace and rest fell on me from the presence Of a benignant Spirit standing near ; " And I should tell him, as he stood beside me : ' This is our Earth, most friendly Earth and fair ; Daily its sea and shore through sun and shadow Faithful it turns, robed in its azure air.
Page 47 - As the husband is, the wife is: thou art mated with a clown, And the grossness of his nature will have weight to drag thee down.
Page 129 - We have not wings, we cannot soar ; But we have feet to scale and climb, By slow degrees, by more and more, The cloudy summits of our time.

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