Report of the Chief of Engineers U.S. Army

Front Cover
U.S. Government Printing Office, 1876

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 606 - Such regulations shall provide for the preservation, from injury or spoliation, of all timber, mineral deposits, natural curiosities, or wonders within said park, and their retention in their natural condition.
Page 698 - It is, of course, impossible to give you any definite instructions in regard to this movement, and were it not impossible to do so, the Department Commander places too much confidence in your zeal, energy, and ability to wish to impose upon you precise orders which might hamper your action when nearly in contact with the enemy.
Page 293 - That whenever by priority of possession rights to the use of water for mining, agricultural, manufacturing, or other purposes have vested and accrued and the same are recognized and acknowledged by the local customs, laws, and the decisions of courts, the possessors and owners of such vested rights shall be maintained and protected in the same...
Page 699 - The Department Commander desires that on your way up the Rosebud you should thoroughly examine the upper part of Tulloch's Creek...
Page 606 - Gardiner's rivers; thence east to the place of beginning is hereby reserved and withdrawn from settlement, occupancy, or sale under the laws of the United States and dedicated and set apart as a public park or pleasuring ground for the benefit and enjoyment of the people...
Page 698 - ... you precise orders which might hamper your action when nearly in contact with the enemy. He will, however, indicate to you his own views of what your action should be, and he desires that you should conform to them unless you shall see sufficient reason for departing from them.
Page 698 - Gibbon is now in motion for the mouth of the Big Horn. As soon as it reaches that point it will cross the Yellowstone and move up at least as far as the forks of the Big and Little Horns.
Page 606 - Yellowstone lake ; thence south along said meridian to the parallel of latitude passing ten miles south of the most southern point of Yellowstone lake ; thence west along said parallel to the meridian passing fifteen miles west of the most western point of Madison lake ; thence north along said meridian to the latitude of the junction of the Yellowstone and Gardiner's rivers ; thence east to the place of beginning...
Page 606 - He shall provide against the wanton destruction of the fish and game found within said park, and against their capture or destruction for the purposes of merchandise or profit.
Page 699 - Gibbon's column with information of the result of your examination. The lower part of this creek will be examined by a detachment from Colonel Gibbon's command. The supply steamer will be pushed up the Big Horn as far as the forks if the river is found to be navigable for that distance...

Bibliographic information