The American Journal of Obstetrics and Diseases of Women and Children, Volume 46

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W.A. Townsend & Adams, 1902
 

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Page 553 - Progressive Medicine: A Quarterly Digest of Advances, Discoveries and Improvements in the Medical and Surgical Sciences. Edited by Hobart Amory Hare, MD, Professor of Therapeutics and Materia Medica in the Jefferson Medical College of Philadelphia; Physician to the Jefferson Medical College Hospital, etc. Volume I. March, 1899. Surgery of the Head, Neck and Chest; Diseases of Children; Pathology; Infectious Diseases, including Croupous Pneumonia; Laryngology and Rhinology; Otology.
Page 874 - Whether antitoxine is given or not, I give ecthol in full doses appropriate for the age of the patient, every three hours, administered by the mouth. The entire fauces, larynx and pharynx are sprayed with a mixture of ecthol and peroxide of hydrogen, three parts of the former to one of the latter, every fifteen to thirty minutes. Calomel in small doses is administered every hour until the bowels are thoroughly moved. Nourishing and supportive diet is given at short, regular intervals, and everything...
Page 119 - Diseases of Women. A manual of non-surgical gynecology, designed especially for the use of students and general practitioners. By Francis H. Davenport, MD, instructor in gynecology in the medical department of Harvard University, Boston. Third edition, thoroughly revised and enlarged, with many additional illustrations. A Treatise on Gynecology.
Page 434 - The incision is made above the umbilicus and a little to the left of the median line, so that no injury may come to the vein in the round ligament.
Page 73 - ... have to expect that human nature would be more and more dwarfed, and unfitted for great things, by its very proficiency in small ones. But matters are not so bad with us ; there is no ground for so dreary an anticipation. It is not the utmost limit of human acquirement to know only one thing, but to combine a minute knowledge of one or a few things with a general knowledge of many things.
Page 120 - D., professor of obstetrics and diseases of women in the Long Island College Hospital. Fifth edition, revised and enlarged.

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