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THREE-POWER CONFERENCE AT GENEVA FOR THE LIMITATION OF NAVAL ARMA

MENT, JUNE 20-AUGUST 4, 1927—Continued

Date and number

Bubject

Page

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483) 5 To the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)

1927 Apr. 28 From the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.) (98) Chamberlain's statement that British Government prefers

Geneva and has so notified Japan, and that necessary steps

are being taken with regard to use of League facilities. May 5 To

Instructions to advise Chamberlain of U. S. assumption that British delegation will either include fully empowered Dominion representatives or will itself be empowered by Domin

ion Governments. May 6 From the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.) (105)

fully empowered Dominion representatives. 11 From the Chargé in Japan (tel.)

38

Proshambermalia adsurance estab endast delegation will include

39

Government that naval limitation be effected at Geneva.

(Footnote: Information that the ministry of Baron Gi-ichi
Tanaka replaced the ministry of Reijiro Wakatsuki in April
1927.)
From the in Italy (tel.)

May 17

39

66)7 Fremalian

. Amebao radnodum, Tial reply to invitation to be repre

May 23

40

May 27

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June 1

42

sented at Conference, reserving right to send naval experts
who may at any given time assume the character of observers
(text printed).

(Footnote: Information that the Department was advised
on June 4 that the Italian Government had appointed two
unofficial observers; information, also, that a French Mission
d'Information attended the plenary sessions.)
To the British Ambassador

Confirmation of arrangement that Three-Power Conference
at Geneva will open on June 20.

(Footnote: Identic note on the same date to the Japanese
Ambassador.)
To President Coolidge

Recommendations as to membership of American delega-
tion.
Memorandum by the Chief of the Division of Western European

Affairs
Record of conference of State and Navy Department officials
with President Coolidge in regard to U. S. policy and proposals
to be laid before Geneva Conference.
To the Chairman of the American Delegation

Notification to Mr. Hugh S. Gibson of his appointment as
chairman of the American delegation; information that Ad-
miral Hilary P. Jones will be a delegate and that Mr. Hugh
R. Wilson will be secretary general; list of State and Navy
Department assistants on the delegation; general instruc-
tions as to U. S. participation, with emphasis on fact that
Conference is most likely to be successful if its deliberations
are restricted to the immediate problem of extension of Wash-
ington treaty principles and ratios to auxiliary vessels.
To the Minister in Switzerland (tel.)

Communication of names of British and Dominion dele-
gates.

43

June 2

(1)

45

June 9

(46)

THREE-POWER CONFERENCE AT GENEVA FOR THE LIMITATION OF NAVAL ARMA

MENT, JUNE 20-AUGUST 4, 1927-Continued

Date and number

Subject

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1927 June 20

(11)

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June 20

(12)

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June 20

(15)

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June 21

(16)

48

June 22

(22)

From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)

Press release (text printed), giving an estimate of tonnage
to be scrapped if American proposal for basis of 300,000 tons
of cruisers and 250,000 tons of destroyers for the United
States and the British Empire, and 180,000 tons of cruisers
and 150,000 tons of destroyers for Japan were accepted; in-
formation that no scrapping of submarines would be required
on basis of 90,000 tons of submarines for the United States and
the British Empire and 54,000 tons for Japan.
From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)

For the President: Message from secretary general of Con-
ference transmitting greetings from the delegates.
From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)

Résumé of first plenary session, at which the chairman of
the American delegation was named president of the Confer-
ence, organization procedure was decided upon, and the three
delegations gave opening statements.
From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)

Executive committee resolution (text printed) recommend-
ing the formation of a technical committee to exchange statis-
tics of present cruiser, destroyer, and submarine tonnage of
each of the powers, the tonnage now authorized and appro-
priated for, and other pertinent information.
From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)

Disappointment of American delegation at receptive atti-
tude of Japanese delegation toward British proposals for
modification of Washington treaty.
From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)

Japanese desire for upward revision of the ratio assigned to
Japan by the Washington treaty.
From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)

Request for instructions concerning whether it should be
suggested to British that U. S. delegation is prepared to
sustain adoption by Conference of a decision (draft printed),
reserving consideration of the British proposals to the 1931
Conference provided under the Washington treaty.
From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)

British insistence upon discussion of capital ships at present
Conference and upon importance of placing limits upon maxi-
mum size of cruisers, destroyers, and submarines.
From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)

Belief that Bridgeman desires à plenary meeting soon in
order that each power may state naval needs and justification
therefor, and that he will argue for preponderant British
strength; intention of American delegation to reiterate that
naval needs depend on strength of other powers and are purely
relative, and by emphasizing certain other factors to bring out
in bold relief Ú. . willingness not only for real limitation but
for reduction as well.
To the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)

Approval of suggested action and draft decision set forth in
chairman's telegram No. 25, June 23.

50

June 22

(23)

50

June 23

(25)

51

June 23

(26)

June 23

52

(27)

53

June 24

(10)

THREE-POWER CONFERENCE AT GENEVA FOR THE LIMITATION OF NAVAL ARMA

MENT, JUNE 20-AUGUST 4, 1927—Continued

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1927
June 24 From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
(31) Reply of American and Japanese delegates, in response to

Bridgeman's inquiry as to suitable time for plenary session
debate on British suggestions concerning battleships and air-
craft carriers, to effect that since their instructions precluded
discussion of Washington treaty revision, they would have to

ask their Governments for pertinent instructions.
June 24 To the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
(11) Authorization to take action outlined in chairman's telegram

No. 27, June 23, if British insist on elaborately defending their
demand for a high cruiser tonnage; assurance that United
States is sincere in regard to maintaining parity with Great
Britain, but on the other hand is unwilling to sign a treaty
increasing British cruiser strength by 75 percent and requiring

the United States to triple its cruiser strength.
June 25 To the Chargé in Great Britain (tel.)
(138) Forwarding of chairman's telegram No. 27, June 23, and

Department's telegram No. 11, June 24, with'instructions to
advise Chamberlain informally of U. S. Government's surprise
concerning British attitude at Geneva, in view of repeated
assurances that Great Britain would accept parity with the

United States in all classes of naval vessels.
June 26 From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
(32) Optimistic view of American delegation that obstacles, such

as satisfying Japanese amour-propre while maintaining Wash-
ington treaty ratio and acceding to British desire for no limita-
tion on number of small cruisers, can be overcome; efforts to
dispose as soon as possible of British suggestions concerning

Washington treaty.
June 27 Prom the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
(33) Information, for State and Navy Departments, that com-

parison of British and American capital ship tonnage on the
Washington standard-ton basis shows that excess British ton-

nage is even greater than was previously indicated.
June 27 From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
(35) Suggestion that British delegation might be aided in with-

drawal from untenable position regarding revision of Washing-
ton treaty, if the Secretary would discuss frankly with British
Embassy in Washington, U. S. interest in nonrevision of the
treaty, insistence upon parity with Great Britain, and desire for

curtailment of naval building program. June 27

the Chairman of .
ment has revised its instructions to permit acquiescence in

British proposals for discussion of capital ships.
June 27 From the British Ambassador

Information, supplied at Chamberlain's direction and for communication to President Coolidge, that the British Government aimed, in including in its proposals the question of reducing the size of capital ships, to further the spirit of the Washington treaty, to set an example for the Preparatory Commission to follow, and to effect economy in reduction of

armaments. 258346-42--vol. 1

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1363" se expression on regret to Japanese delegate that his Govern

61

3

THREE-POWER CONFERENCE AT GENEVA FOR THE LIMITATION OF NAVAL ARMA

MENT, JUNE 20-AUGUST 4, 1927—Continued

Date and number

Subject

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1927 June 28

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64

June 28

(20)

June 30

64

65

June 30

(44)

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June 30

45)

To President Coolidge

Transmittal of British Ambassador's note of June 27, with
comments.
To the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)

Information that it is impossible to carry out the suggestion
in chairman's telegram No. 35, June 27, because of absence of
British Embassy force from Washington, but that copies of
chairman's telegram No. 27, June 23, and the Department's
telegram No. 11, June 24, have been forwarded to the Ameri-
can Embassy in London with instructions.
From President Coolidge

Approval of Secretary's position as set forth in letter of
June 28.
From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)

Press interview authorized by Bridgeman (text printed),
denying demand for naval supremacy and reiterating principle
of U. S.-British parity, but also expressing opinion that while
Great Britain's special needs require a higher number in certain
types of vessels, the United States has the right to build up to
an equal figure in any type of warship.
From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)

Summary of developments favorable to American position:
British action in preferring postponement of public sessions,
end of their insistence on public debate on U. S.-British naval
needs, realization that they cannot force Washington treaty
revision by rush tactics, and the reasonable spirit exhibited by
the technical committees.
From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)

Information that if the British are disinclined to reduce their
excessive demands for 75 cruisers, of either 7,500 or 10,000 tons
each, American delegation intends to say that it believes the
British should publish their figures, together with their justi-
fication therefor, and state quite frankly that it was impossible
to come to an agreement, thus leaving the entire matter for
general agreement in 1931.
To the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)

Instructions to advise British that no proposal which sets
total cruiser tonnage figure to be arrived at before 1936 at
more than 400,000 tons would make conclusion of an agreement
worth while; request for comment on Secretary's intention to
consult Canadian and Irish Legations as to any demands for
excessive tonnage increases; inquiry regarding possible discus-
sions with the Japanese Ambassador.
From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)

Advice that British have already been informed of unaccep-
tability of their figures as real limitation, and opinion that
neither inquiries to Canadian and Irish Legations nor discus-
sion with Japanese Ambassador would be advantageous.
To the Chargé in Great Britain (tel.)

Transmittal of chairman's telegram No. 53, July 2, with in-
structions to discuss with Baldwin or Chamberlain, if thought
advisable, the excessive cruiser tonnage proposed by the
British.

66

July 2

(53)

69

July 2

(26)

69

July 4

(58)

70

July 5

(147)

7

THREE-POWER CONFERENCE AT GENEVA FOR THE LIMITATION OF NAVAL ARMA

MENT, JUNE 20-AUGUST 4, 1927–Continued

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(64)

o the

1927 July 5 From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.) (60) American delegation's suggestion for eventually reconciling

British proposal based on numbers with American proposal

based on total tonnage (text printed).
July 5 From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
(61) Information that Japanese refuse to accept cruiser tonnage

basis of 400,000 tons, that they intend to demand that British
revise their figures downward, and that the American delega-

tion has promised hearty cooperation in this demand.
July 6 To the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
(27) Conversation between the Secretary of State and the British

Ambassador, in which each explained the attitude of his re-
spective delegation with regard to the general problems of the
Conference and also to the specific question of British cruiser

tonnage demands.
July 6 From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
(63) Résumé of interview with British on cruiser question, which

ended without a solution having been reached. July

6 From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)

adoption of a 450,000-ton basis for auxiliary surface craft for
the United States and Great Britain, with 300,000-ton basis for
Japan, and 70,000 tons of submarines for Japan.
From the of the
figures proposed by the Japanese, they may be induced to
reasonableness by knowledge that they stand alone in demand

for a large cruiser tonnage.
(156) Frominhena mbats poter sur Great Britaininctele

? Chamberlain will probably be unproductive of results; willingness, however, to impress on them six specific points showing the unfavorable reaction on U. S.-British relations if the British persist in

present policy at Geneva. July 7 To the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)

To (151) Desire that Ambassador discuss situation with British on

basis of his suggestions.
July 7 From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
(68) Japanese intention to submit their proposals formally to

executive committee and to express determination to abandon
Conference if agreement for lower tonnage figures is not

reached.
July 7 From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
(69) Suggestion that, if break-up of Conference appears inevit-

able, a private conversation of the chief delegates be called at
which a general statement of U. S. position may be given and
plans may be made for a public statement of the case of each
power, in order that public may have information on which
to base study of the issues involved.

77

Jul65) Presentee that,menough the British refuse to accept tonnage

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