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THREE-POWER CONFERENCE AT GENEVA FOR THE LIMITATION OF NAVAL ARMA

MENT, JUNE 20-August 4, 1927—Continued

Date and number

Subject

Page

1927 July 25

(62)

133

July 25

133

134

July 26

(63)

135

July 26

(116)

To the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)

Instructions to advise how much variation from Washington
treaty ratio the naval advisers would recommend, since
political question involved is how much variation from the
Washington treaty can be allowed without endangering
treaty itself.
From President Coolidge

Commendation of the Secretary and the American delega-
tion for maintenance of U. S. position at Geneva; belief that
the United States should not deviate from its position, espe-
cially with regard to 10,000-ton cruisers and 8-inch guns, and
assertion that if the other powers cannot accept the V. S.
proposal, they will have the responsibility for its rejection.
To the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)
blame possible break-down of Conference on alleged U. S.
ambitions for a big navy, that Great Britain is the only power
seeking a large naval program and that it has refused to
accept the proposed tonnage limitation figures.
Prom the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)

Disinclination to consider several suggested alternatives: (1)
Two-power agreement between the United States and either
Great Britain or Japan, (2) nonrestriction of cruisers and
agreement only on submarines and destroyers, (3) nonrestric-
tion of small cruisers and restriction of 10,000-ton cruisers,
and (4) negotiation of an arrangement based on building
program up to 1931.
To the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)

Approval of chairman's attitude toward the suggestions
outlined in telegram No. 116, July 26; request for further in-
formation on the fourth proposition.
From the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)

Official remarks by Chamberlain (excerpt printed), to the
effect that, while his Government is willing to have a tempo-
rary arrangement concerning cruiser building, it could not
permit such an arrangement to be considered so immutable
as to constitute a precedent.

(Repeated to Geneva.)
From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)

Prediction that break-down of Conference cannot be
avoided, in view of information that British have not made
any substantial change in their demand for small cruisers and
6-inch armament.
From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)

Deadlock of Conference over 8-inch-gun question resulting
from inclusion in new British proposals of the same objec-
tionable proposal for 6,000-ton 6-inch-gun cruisers; unaccept-
ability to British of suggested political clause; fixing of date for
plenary session, at which each Government may state its
position.
To President Coolidge (tel.)

Telegram to delegation at Geneva (text printed) suggesting
that to avoid disastrous consequences of break-up of Confer-
ence, it might be well to abandon the scheduled plenary ses.
sion and adjourn for a few months to permit time for reflection.

July 27

(65)

135

136

July 28 (173)

136

July 28 (122)

137

July 28 (126)

July 29

138

THREE-POWER CONFERENCE AT GENEVA FOR THE LIMITATION OF NAVAL ARMA

MENT, JUNE 20-AUGUST 4, 1927—Continued

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1927 July 29

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139

140

July 30 (137)

141

July 30

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141

July 31

(82)

To the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)

Statement by the President to the press (text printed), basing
failure of Conference to reach an agreement thus far on U. S.
inability to agree to British proposals calling for the building of a
much larger navy than is thought necessary, but expressing
opinion that such proposals may be modified in current discus-
sions to an extent enabling the United States to agree.
From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)

Request for immediate instructions as to desirability of sug-
gesting to Japanese that they propose adjournment to American
and British delegations, in order to avoid the unfavorable
implications of a weakening in U. S. attitude if its delegation
takes initiative in proposing adjournment.
To the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)

Information that the President has disapproved an adjourn-
ment and has instructed that a clear, firm statement of U.S.
position be given; also information that the chairman's telegram
No. 137, July 30, was forwarded to the President. Instruc-
tions to advise should either Great Britain or Japan propose
an adjournment.

(Footnote: Information that a telegram was received from
the President at 9:20 p.m., July 30, authorizing the Secretary
to use his own discretion as to instructions.)
To the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)

Advice that any suggestion for a naval holiday during a
provisional period, as reported in a London press despatch,
should be given careful consideration before abandoning Con-
ference.
From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)

Résumé of interviews with British delegates which demon-
strate the irreconcilability of American and British views.
Information that the final American statement is being pre-
pared for presentation at the plenary session.
From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)

Suggestion that, in view of Geneva press reports that Bald-
win may consult the U.S. Secretary of State in Washington as
to plans to prevent collapse of Conference, Secretary may
think it best that plenary session be postponed until after the
interview.
To the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)

Information that Secretary has not received any official in-
dication of Baldwin's desire to confer on subject of Conference.
British Ambassador's comment that naval holiday plan might
offer basis on which the Governments could agree.
From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)

Information that American delegation is preparing state-
ment to be made at plenary session; that Japanese are appar-
ently unwilling to initiate adjournment idea, and that British
seem anxious for Japanese to propose some solution, possibly
of a compromise nature. Request for instructions as to
attitude toward possible proposal (1) that a final act be adopted
setting forth work of Conference and recommending that the
whole question be considered in 1931 or (2) that each delega-
tion address to plenary session inoffensive speeches approved
in advance by the other delegations. The chairman's prefer-
ence for first proposal.

142

July 31

(139)

145

July 31

(141)

145

Aug. 1

(87)

146

Aug. 1

(147)

THREE-POWER CONFERENCE AT GENEVA FOR THE LIMITATION OF NAVAL ARMA

MENT, JUNE 20-AUGUST 4, 1927—Continued

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Subject

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1927 Aug. 3

148

Aug. 3

150

Aug. 3

152

(95)

152

Aug. 4

(155)

To President Coolidge (tel.)

Transmittal of telegram No. 149, August 1, from American
delegation, quoting Japanese plan for limitation of auxiliary
vessel construction up to 1931, together with delegation's com-
ments and Secretary's reply, to effect that the plan does not
appear very satisfactory but that it would be better for Great
Britain to turn down the proposal than for the United States to
do so (texts printed).
To President Coolidge (tel.)

Transmittal of Secretary's reply to chairman's telegram No.
147, August 1, agreeing that first proposal should be supported;
of chairman's further suggestion for a joint public statement
that agreement on cruisers has not been possible and that,
therefore, adjournment is being agreed upon in an effort to give
a chance for direct negotiations between interested Govern-
ments; and of Secretary's approval of latter course of action
(texts printed).
To the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)

Assurance by Senator Robinson, Democratic leader, that he
will support U. S. course at Geneva.
From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)

British insistence on separate statements; procedure for the
final session agreed upon by the three delegations: (1) intro-
ductory statement by chairman of the American delegation, (2)
statements by British, Japanese, and American delegations, (3)
prohibition on debate, and (4) the reading and approval of a
joint declaration in which the three delegations recognize the
deadlock which makes it wise to adjourn with a frank statement
of divergent views and also state their intention to submit the
matter to the respective Governments for further study.
To President Coolidge (tel.)

Joint declaration read at final session (text printed), with
recommendation that 1931 Conference provided under Wash-
ington treaty be held earlier than August of that year.
To President Coolidge (tel.)

Statement to press (text printed) with regard to the final
session, expressing belief that the discussions will not have
been fruitless and that failure to reach agreement will not
impair the cordial U. S.-British relations.
Memorandum by the Secretary of State

Conversation with the Japanese Ambassador concerning pro-
ceedings and termination of Conference.
To President Coolidge

Regret at failure of Conference; opinion that the United
States could not have prevented such an outcome in view of
British attitude. Belief that apparent British desire for naval
supremacy may influence Congress to extend the U. S. building
program.

Aug. 4

153

Aug. 4

155

Aug. 5

156

Aug. 10

157

PARTICIPATION OF THE UNITED STATES IN THE WORK OF THE THIRD AND FOURTH SESSIONS OF THE PREPARATORY COMMISSION FOR

DISARMAMENT

THE CONFERENCE

Date and number

Subject

Page

159

162

163

166

1926 Dec. 9 From the Secretary of the American Representation on the Pre(190) paratory Commission

Specific references to American delegation's position on questions dealt with by subcommission A (Military, Naval, and Air), as set forth in report of subcommission A, for possible use in preparation of written communication to League Secretariat concerning report of subcommission B (Joint Commis

sion).
Dec. 29 To the Secretary of the American Representation on the Prepara-
(85)

tory Commission (tel.)
Instructions to address a letter to Secretariat, with request
that it be circulated to the governments concerned, informing
League that the United States is unable to submit comments
before December 31, but that when statement is submitted it
will include comments on certain questions which were in-
cluded in Joint Commission's report and not included in sub-
commission A's report, with respect to which questions U. S.
Government wishes to make clear that it does not accept the

conclusions of the Joint Commission's report.
1927
Jan. 11 To the Chairman of the Committee on Foreign Affairs of the House

of Representatives
Information as to aims and work of Preparatory Commis-
sion, for purpose of encouraging favorable congressional action
on President's recommendation that funds be appropriated for

further participation in the Commission by the United States. Feb. 10 To the Secretary of the American Representation on the Prepara(8)

tory Commission
Memorandum for Secretary General of the League (text
printed), containing American comments on the report of the
Joint Commission.

(Footnote: Information that the memorandum was circu-
lated by the Secretary General to Preparatory Commission

and League members on March 10.)
Mar. 7 | From the Ambassador in Great Britain (tel.)
(57) Information that British will lay before opening meeting of

Commission on March 21 a draft convention embodying plan
for the high contracting parties to bring their proposals on
strength in land, sea, and air forces before the final Conference,
such proposals to be considered separately by appropriate

subcommittees.
Mar. 21 From the Chief of the American Representation on the
(186) Preparatory Commission (tel.)

Presentation by British delegate of draft convention, and expression by French delegate of intention to submit alterna

tive draft embodying French views.
Mar. 22 To the Chief of the American Representation on the Preparatory
(95)

Commission (tel.)
Information, in event it becomes necessary to define U. S.
attitude toward an economic blockade which League Council
could declare under article XVI of the Covenant, that the
United States cannot participate in any such blockade; in-
ability of United States to become a party to an agreement in.
volving any form of international supervision or control of
armaments.

175

176

177

PARTICIPATION OF THE UNITED STATES IN THE WORK OF THE THIRD AND FOURTH

SESSIONS OF THE PREPARATORY COMMISSION FOR THE DISARMAMENT CONFERENCE-Continued

Date and number

Subject

Page

1927 Mar. 23

(191)

177

179

Mar. 23

(194)

179

Mar. 24

(195)

183

Mar. 24

(196)

From the Chief of the American Representation on the Prepara

tory Commission (tel.)
Outline of two possible courses which will be open to United
States after British, French, and possibly other texts have
been presented for discussion: (1) To continue to present
views on all questions with the idea that they be adopted in
draft convention, and (2) to set forth views and make known
what sort of treaty the United States could accept, leaving to
the other delegations the responsibility for adopting draft
which would make U. S. participation either possible or im-
possible; request for instructions.
From the Chief of the American Representation on the Prepara-

tory Commission (tel.)
View that if second course outlined in telegram No. 191,
March 23, is adopted, American delegation might suggest pos-
sibility of dividing the convention into two parts, the United
States to adhere to the first part containing the absolute limi-
tation and reduction of armaments, and the League members
to adhere, in addition, to the second part concerning enforce-
ment by League agencies.
From the Chief of the American Representation on the Prepara-

tory Commission (tel.)
Proposed statement to Commission (text printed), offering
the idea of a double convention, in case Department approves
the second course outlined in telegram No. 191, March 23.
From the Chief of the American Representation on the Prepara-

tory Commission (tel.)
Request for early decision as to double convention idea, in
view of desire of colleagues to broach this idea which they
worked out independently.
To the Chief of the American Representation on the Preparatory

Commission (tel.)
Preliminary comment on proposed statement, to the effect
that it may be too much of an endorsement of League super-
vision; intention to send complete comment March 26.
From the Chief of the American Representation on the Prepara-

tory Commission (tel.)
Opinion that no other course than the one outlined in pro-
posed statement will prevent the United States from incurring
the odium of blocking the Conference; request for instructions.
To the Chief of the American Representation on the Preparatory

Commission (tel.)
Objections to statement in present form, and instructions
that any statement made should conform to U. S. position of
nonaccord with proposals for any form of supervision or control
of armaments by any international body, whether League of
Nations or any other organization.
From the Chief of the American Representation on the Prepara-

tory Commission (tel.)
Request for authority to revise statement so as to meet objec-
tions outlined in Department's telegram No. 99, March 26,
and to present it promptly to Commission.

184

Mar. 25

(98)

184

Mar. 26

(199)

186

Mar. 26

(99)

188

Mar. 27

(201)

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