Eastward-ho!, Volume 3, Issues 1-6

Front Cover

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 546 - For woman is not undevelopt man, But diverse : could we make her as the man, Sweet Love were slain : his dearest bond is this. Not like to like, but like in difference. Yet in the long years liker must they grow ; The man be more of woman, she of man; He gain in sweetness and in moral height, Nor lose the wrestling thews that throw the world ; She mental breadth, nor fail in childward care, Nor lose the childlike in the larger mind; Till at the last she set herself to man, Like perfect music unto...
Page 151 - Prune thou thy words, the thoughts control, That o'er thee swell and throng; They will condense within thy soul, And change to purpose strong. " But he who lets his feelings run In soft, luxurious flow, Shrinks when hard service must be done, And faints at every woe. " Faith's meanest deed more favour bears, Where hearts and wills are weighed, Than brightest transports, choicest prayers, Which bloom their hour and fade.
Page 543 - everywhere Two heads in council, two beside the hearth, Two in the tangled business of the world, Two in the liberal offices of life, Two plummets dropt for one to sound the abyss Of science, and the secrets of the mind : Musician, painter, sculptor, critic, more : And everywhere the broad and bounteous Earth Should bear a double growth of those rare souls, Poets, whose thoughts enrich the blood of the world.
Page 441 - He hath made every thing beautiful in his time: also he hath set the world in their heart, so that no man can find out the work that God maketh from the beginning to the end.
Page 342 - Christ's sheep that are dispersed abroad, and for his children who are in the midst of this naughty world, that they may be saved through Christ for ever.
Page 546 - Till at the last she set herself to man, Like perfect music unto noble words; And so these twain, upon the skirts of Time, Sit side by side, full-summ'd in all their powers, Dispensing harvest, sowing the To-be, Self-reverent each and reverencing each, Distinct in individualities, But like each other ev'n as those who love.
Page 235 - All true Work is sacred ; in all true Work, were it but true hand-labour, there is something of divineness. Labour, wide as the Earth, has its summit in Heaven. Sweat of the brow ; and up from that to sweat of the brain, sweat of the heart ; which includes all Kepler calculations, Newton meditations, all Sciences, all spoken Epics, all acted Heroisms, Martyrdoms, — up to that 'Agony of bloody sweat,' which all men have called divine!
Page 449 - So spake the fierce Tertullian. But she sighed, The infant Church ; of love she felt the tide Stream on her from her Lord's yet recent grave. And then she smiled, and in the Catacombs, With eye suffused but heart inspired true, On those walls subterranean, where she...
Page 349 - Whatever crazy sorrow saith, No life that breathes with human breath Has ever truly long'd for death. ' 'Tis life, whereof our nerves are scant, Oh life, not death, for which we pant ; More life, and fuller, that I want.
Page 463 - mong men, not mailed in scorn, But in the armour of a pure intent. Great duties are before me, and great songs, And whether crowned or crownless, when I fall, It matters not, so as God's work is done.

Bibliographic information