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government asking for the extradition, it shall be competent for the judge or magistrate at his discretion to hold the accused for a period not exceeding two months, so that the demanding government may have opportunity to lay before such judge or magistrate legal evidence of the guilt of the accused, and if at the expiration of the said period of two months such legal evidence shall not have been produced before such judge or magistrate, the person arrested shall be released, provided that the examination of the charges preferred against such accused person shall not be actually going on.

ARTICLE XIII. In every case of a request made by either of the two contracting parties for the arrest, detention or extradition of fugitives, criminal or accused, the legal officers or fiscal ministry of the country where the proceedings of extradition are had shall assist the officers of the government demanding the extradition before the respective judges and magistrates, by every legal means within their or its power; and no claim whatever for compensation for any of the services so rendered shall be made against the government demanding the extradition, provided, however, that any officer or officers of the surrendering government so giving assistance, who shall, in the usual course of their duty, receive no salary or compensation other than specific fees for services performed, shall be entitled to receive from the government demanding the extradition the customary fees for the acts or services performed by them, in the same manner and to the same amount as though such acts or services had been performed in ordinary criminal proceedings under the laws of the country of which they are officers.

ARTICLE XIV. This convention shall take effect from the day of the exchange of the ratification thereof; but either contracting party may at any time terminate the same on giving to the other six months' notice of its intention to do so.

The ratifications of the present convention shall be exchanged at Washington as soon as possible.

In witness whereof the respective plenipotentiaries have signed the above articles, and have hereunto affixed their seals.

Done in duplicate at the city of Washington, this 7th day of May, one thousand nine hundred and eight.

Elihu Root. [L. s.]
ALTE,

[L. S.]

NOTES CONCERNING THE DEATH PENALTY EXCHANGED BETWEEN THE

PORTUGUESE MINISTER AND THE SECRETARY OF STATE AT THE TIME OF SIGNATURE OF THE EXTRADITION CONVENTION BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES AND PORTUGAL.

PORTUGUESE LEGATION,

Washington, May 7, 1908. The undersigned Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary of His Most Faithful Majesty the King of Portugal and the Algarves has the honor to inform the Secretary of State of the United States that he has been instructed by His Excellency the Minister for Foreign Affairs of Portugal to place on record on behalf of the Portuguese government, with reference to the Extradition Treaty which the Secretary of State and the undersigned have just signed, its understanding that the government of the United States assures that the death penalty will not be enforced against criminals delivered by Portugal to the United States for any of the crimes enumerated in the said treaty, and that such assurance is, in effect, to form part of the treaty and will be so mentioned in the ratifications of the treaty.

VISCONDE DE ALTE. His EXCELLENCY, ELIHU Root,

Secretary of State of the United States.

DEPARTMENT OF STATE,

Washington, May, 7, 1908. In signing to-day with the Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary of His Most Faithful Majesty the King of Portugal and of the Algarves the extradition treaty which was negotiated between the Government of the United States and that of Portugal, the undersigned Secretary of State has the honor to acknowledge and to take cognizance of the Minister's note of this day's date stating that he has been instructed by His Excellency the Minister for Foreign Affairs of Portugal to place on record, on behalf of the Portuguese government, its understanding that the government of the United States assures that the death penalty will not be enforced against criminals delivered by Portugal to the United States for any of the crimes enumerated in the said treaty, and that such assurance is, in effect, to form part of the treaty and will be so mentioned in the ratifications of the treaty.

In order to make this assurance in the most effective manner possible, it is agreed by the United States that no person charged with crime shall be extraditable from Portugal upon whom the death penalty can be inflicted for the offense charged by the laws of the jurisdiction in which the charge is pending.

This agreement on the part of the United States will be mentioned in the ratifications of the treaty and will in effect form part of the treaty.

ELIHU Root. VISCONDE DE ALTE,

Minister of Portugal.

SPECIAL AGREEMENT FOR THE SUBMISSION OF QUESTIONS RELATING TO

FISHERIES ON THE NORTH ATLANTIC COAST UNDER THE GENERAL TREATY OF ARBITRATION CONCLUDED BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES AND GREAT BRITAIN ON THE 4TH DAY OF APRIL, 1908.

January 27, 1909.

ARTICLE I. Whereas, by article I of the convention signed at London on the 20th day of October, 1818, between the United States and Great Britain, it was agreed as follows:

“Whereas differences have arisen respecting the liberty claimed by the United States for the inhabitants thereof, to take, dry and cure fish on certain coasts, bays, harbours and creeks of His Britannic Majesty's dominions in America, it is agreed between the high contracting parties, that the inhabitants of the said United States, shall have forever, in common with the subjects of His Britannic Majesty, the liberty to take Fish of every kind on that part of the southern coast of Newfoundland which extends from Cape Ray to the Rameau Islands, on the western and northern coast of Newfoundland, from the said Cape Ray to the Quirpon Islands on the shores of the Magdalen Islands, and also on the coasts, bays, harbours, and creeks from Mount Joly on the southern coast of Labrador, to and through the Straits of Belleisle and thence northwardly indefinitely along the coast, without prejudice however, to any of the exclusive rights of the Hudson Bay Company; and that the American fishermen shall also have liberty forever, to dry and cure fish in any of the unsettled bays, harbours, and creeks of the southern part of the coast of Newfoundland hereabove described, and of the coast of Labrador; but so soon as the same, or any portion thereof, shall be settled, it shall not be lawful for the said fishermen to dry or cure fish at such portion so settled, without previous agreement for such purpose with the inhabitants, proprietors, or possessors of the ground. — And the United States hereby renounce forever, any liberty heretofore enjoyed or claimed by the inhabitants thereof, to take, dry, or cure fish on, or within three marine miles of any of the coasts, bays, creeks, or harbours of His Britannic Majesty's dominions in America not included within the above mentioned limits; provided, however, that the American fishermen shall be admitted to enter such bays or harbours for the purpose of shelter and of repairing damages therein, of purchasing wood, and of obtaining water, and for no other purpose whatever. But they shall be under such restrictions as may be necessary to prevent their taking, drying or curing fish therein, or in any other manner whatever abusing the privileges hereby reserved to them.”

And, whereas, differences have arisen as to the scope and meaning of the said article, and of the liberties therein referred to, and otherwise in respect of the rights and liberties which the inhabitants of the United States have or claim to have in the waters or on the shores therein referred to:

It is agreed that the following questions shall be submitted for decision to a tribunal of arbitration constituted as hereinafter provided :

Question 1. To what extent are the following contentions or either of them justified ?

It is contended on the part of Great Britain that the exercise of the liberty to take fish referred to in the said article, which the inhabitants of the United States have forever in common with the subjects of His Britannic Majesty, is subject, without the consent of the United States, to reasonable regulation by Great Britain, Canada, or Newfoundland in the form of municipal laws, ordinances, or rules, as, for example, to regulations in respect of (1) the hours, days, or seasons when fish may be taken on the treaty coasts; (2) the method, means, and implements to be used in the taking of fish or in the carrying on of fishing operations on such coasts; (3) any other matters of a similar character relating to fishing; such regulations being reasonable, as being, for instance —

(a) Appropriate or necessary for the protection and preservation of such fisheries and the exercise of the rights of British subjects therein and of the liberty which by the said article I the inhabitants of the United States have therein in common with British subjects;

(6) Desirable on grounds of public order and morals;

(c) Equitable and fair as between local fishermen and the inhabi. tants of the United States exercising the said treaty liberty and not so framed as to give unfairly an advantage to the former over the latter class.

It is contended on the part of the United States that the exercise of such liberty is not subject to limitations or restraints by Great Britain, Canada, or Newfoundland in the form of municipal laws, ordinances, or regulations in respect of (1) the hours, days, or seasons when the inhabitants of the United States may take fish on the treaty coasts, or (2) the method, means, and implements used by them in taking fish or in carrying on fishing operations on such coasts, or (3) any other limitations or restraints of similar character —

(a) Unless they are appropriate and necessary for the protection and preservation of the common rights in such fisheries and the exercise thereof; and

(6) Unless they are reasonable in themselves and fair as between local fishermen and fishermen coming from the United States, and not so framed as to give an advantage to the former over the latter class; anc

(c) Unless their appropriateness, necessity, reasonableness, and fairness be determined by the United States and Great Britain by common accord and the United States concurs in their enforcement.

Question 2. Have the inhabitants of the United States, while exercising the liberties referred to in said article, a right to employ as members of the fishing crews of their vessels persons not inhabitants of the United States ?

Question 3. Can the exercise by the inhabitants of the United States of the liberties referred to in the said article be subjected, without the consent of the United States, to the requirements of entry or report at custom-houses or the payment of light or harbor or other dues, or to any other similar requirement or condition or exaction?

Question 4. Under the provision of the said article that the American fishermen shall be admitted to enter certain bays or harbors for shelter, repairs, wood, or water, and for no other purpose whatever, but that they shall be under such restrictions as may be necessary to prevent their taking, drying, or curing fish therein or in any other manner whatever abusing the privileges thereby reserved to them, is it permissible to impose restrictions making the exercise of such privileges conditional upon the payment of light or harbor or other dues, or entering or reporting at custom-houses or any similar conditions ?

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