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mately one-fourth of the total amount of oak whose manufacturers will “butt in " powerfully lumber produced in one year, according to the to keep their shops going. Twelfth Census. Nearly all of the oak is con So at the eleventh hour, England turns to the verted into hewed ties, only 12.6 per cent. being consideration of home forestry. Plans are now sawed.

under discussion for the organization of a naPine ranks next in importance, with 23.5 per tional forestry board, and for the appropriation cent., and while it can not be definitely stated of many million of pounds sterling to the plantjust what proportion should be assigned to the ing of trees. And “experts" recommend the various species, it is certain that more than planting of pines and firs as two of the trees three-fourths of the pine ties are southern yellow whose “ rapid growth” will bring the earliest repine. The white and Norway pines should be turns in merchantable lumber!—Maxwell's Taliscredited with from 3 to 4 per cent. and the west- | man. ern yellow pine of the Rocky Mountain and Pacific Coast regions with from 17 to 18 per cent. The statistics show that 7,510,000 ties, or nearly

Consumption of Tanbark in 1905. 10 per cent. of the total number purchased, were given a preservative treatment of some character. TR. H. M. HALE, Forest Assistant, in

vi Circular No. 42, gives the consumption

of tanbark in 1905, based upon the A Forestry Revival in Great Britain.

reports of 222 firms operating 477 tanneries. The total amount of bark reported is 1,104,045

cords, of which hemlock constitutes 799,755 1 ND now it is England's turn to sit on the cords, or 73 per cent., and oak 304,290 cords, or A anxious seat and brood over the coming 27 per cent. The average price per cord reported

of a timber famine, bearing in its train for hemlock bark is $6.32, and for the oak bark disaster to countless industries. A hundred years $10.44, making a total value of $8,232,457. ago the government ceased paying any attention! The tanneries of Pennsylvania lead in the to home forests as a source of timber supply. quantity of bark purchased, the total being There were almost twenty million acres of waste 428,709 cords, of which 379,806 cords were land in the United Kingdom ; which, had they hemlock and 48,903 cords oak. This is nearly been planted with timber trees—following the double the quantity of bark purchased in Michiexample of continental countries, some of which gan, the State which ranks next in importance. had even earlier discerned the necessity of State for- | In the purchase of oak bark Virginia holds first ests—would now be furnishing a perennial supply place, with 73,871 cords. of lumber. But the need was not then felt; and In addition to bark and chemicals, the tanneries shortly afterward the introduction of steam navi- | use large quantities of extracts made from hemlock gation and iron ships made even the famed British , and oak bark and chestnut wood, together with a oak obsolete as a necessity for the navy. All considerable amount of imported quebracho and sorts of timber could be cheaply imported from gambier. Sumach leaves and palmetto extracts abroad. So, while the imports of lumber grew

are also used to some extent. and grew, the home product declined to insignifi- Not only have substitutes for bark been found, cance. Such waste lands as were reclaimed were but the processes in use have been greatly imgiven to agriculture or parks. The dream was proved, so that in the best equipped tanneries at that the supply to be obtained from America and the present time from 20 to 30 per cent. more elsewhere was inexhaustible.

leather can be tanned with the same amount of But now, when the British consumption of im

bark than was possible a few years ago. ported lumber has grown to the enormous figure of about $150,000,000 annually, word is passed along the line that the permanency of the foreign On behalf of the State forestry commission of supply can no longer be depended upon. Associ- | Vermont, Ernest Hitchcock, commissioner, has ations in the United States demand a prohibition submitted to the governor a report showing that of all further exports of lumber as a measure of | 4,000,000 acres of land in the State are of a necessity to the continued existence of many character suitable only for timber growth. At American industries. For the supply obtainable present this acreage is nonproductive, but Mr. in Canada and Scandinavia, Britain must now Hitchcock claims that if handled properly a compete not only with continental Europe, tree revenue of $1 to $2 an acre could be realized less China and Japan, but with the United States, annually.

Biltmore Forest School, |Yale University Forest School BILTMORE, N. C.

NEW HAVEN - - CONNECTICUT

Tue BILTMORE FOREST School is the only technical school of forestry in this country. It illustrates its teachings on a large scale, on a tract of land owned by George W. Vanderbilt, comprising 130,000 acres of forest.

The complete course covers twelve consecutive months. Write for particulars, addressing C. A. SCHENCK, Ph.D., Director,

BILTMORE, N. C. EXPERT advice on any forestal proposition furnished, and estimates of timber, valuation, surveys and working plans made by

A two years' graduate course is offered, leading to the degree of Master of Forestry. Graduates of collegiate institutions of high standing are admitted upon presentation of their college diplomas.

The Summer School of Forestry is conducted at Milford, Pike County, Penna.

For further information address

HENRY S. GRAVES, Director,

NEW HAVEN, CONN.

CHESTNUT HILL ACADEMY,

CHESTNUT HILL, PHILA.

30 minutes from Broad St. Station.

BOARDING SCHOOL FOR BOYS. ·

Nlustrated Catalogue upon application.

PAUL E. ARNOLD, Consulting Forester.

GIBRALTAR, PA.

LEWIS' TREE CHARTS. The whole series consists of fifteen numbers, divided into PARTS of three numbers each. They may be purchased singly

by the part,-or by the full series, at the prices named below. More than half of the series has already been printed. The drawings are completed, and the remaining charts will be puhlished at the earliest practicable date. One thousand paid subscriptions of $6.00 each would insure the immediate publication of the whole series.

TERMS:--CASH IN ADVANCE.
Price of single number. 50 cents each.
Price of Part, $1.40 each.

A liberal deduction will be made to Boards of Education or
others purchasing in large numbers.
NOW READY.-(These with a * as yet unprinted.)
PART I.-THE OAKS. Forty-two species.

No. 1. Biennial Fruited Oaks. Black Oak and Allies.
No. 2. Annual Fruited Oaks. White Oak and Allies.
No. 3. Southern, Pacific, Hardy, Foreign, and examples of

Extinct Oaks.
PART II.-THE NUT BEARERS. Numerous species.
No. 4. The Chestnuts and Beeches. American, Japanese and

European Chestnuts.
No. 5. The Walnuts. American, Japanese and European

species and varieties.
No. 6. The Hickories. American species and varieties.
PART III. -

No. 7. The Willows and Poplars. Numerous species.
No. 8. The Bircher, Elms and allies.

No. 9. The Lindens, and allied families of numerous species. PART IV.

*No. 10. The Magnolia and related trees.
*No. 11. The Horse Chestnuts and allies.

No. 12. The Maples. (Printed in advance.)
PART V.-

*No. 13. Locusts and allies of Pea Family of several genera. *No. 14) Wild Cherry, Mountain Ash, Sweet Gum, Sour Gum,

Persimmon. *No. 15) Ashes, Catalpas, Paulownia, and others. For further information address the author, publisher and

proprietor,
GRACEANNA LEWIS,
Media, - - - - Pennsylvania.

JAMES L. PATTERSON,

Head Mastor.

BOARD OF TRUSTEES: Rt. Rev. Ozı W. WHITAKER, D.D., President. SAMUEL F. HOUSTON, Vice-President. GEORGE WOODWARD, Secretary and Treasurer,

JAMES M. BECK. WALTON CLARK.

DR. HOWARD A. KELLY. JACOB S. DISSTON.

FRANCIS D. LEWIS. EDGAR DUDLEY FARIES. RANDAL MORGAN. FRANCIS 1. GOWEN.

H. GORDON MCCOUCH. J. LEVERING JONES.

RT. REV. HENRY Y. SATTERLEE, D.D. JAMES R. SHEFFIELD.

ANDORRA'S PIN OAKS.

A justly popular tree is the Pin Oak. It presents points which distinguish it readily from other Oaks, and it is undoubtedly the most valuable variety for all practical purposes. The foliage is dense, finely divided, of a beautiful shining green that colors to sparkling red and yellow in Fall. The tree is easily transplanted and grows well on wet or dry ground; is, in fact, the quickest-growing of all the Oaks. As an avenue tree it is unequalled. It is also a good street tree, and one of the best for park planting.

This desirable tree will thrive in all sections of the United States, in all soils and situations. Our stock (over 30,000) of this POPULAR TREE is clean and healthy, with plenty of fibrous roots.

EVERY TREE A SPECIMEN,

OUR BOOKLET "MORE SPECIALTIES." 3d EDITION, DESCRIBES THESE AND MANY OTHERS.

SPECIAL OFFER.
REMEMBER! EVERY TREE A SPECIMEN!

Per lo

6 to 7 ft. Stocky Trees, 7 to 8 ft.

" 8 to 9 ft. “ “ 9 to 10 ft. " " 10 to 12 ft. " "

Each
.................... PI 00
.................... I 25
.................... 150

::::::::::::::::: 2 00
..

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Prices on Larger Specimens on application.

10 00 12 50 17 50

Per 100 $40 00

50 00 55 oo 60 oo

75 oC

Send for SPRING PRICE LIST and booklet “ HINTS ON PLANTING.

ANDORRA NURS. RIES, WM. WARNER HARPER, Prop.

CHESTNUT HILL, PHILADELPHIA, PA.

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