Education and culture

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George S. Davis, 1889 - 127 pages
 

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Page 73 - The knowledge that a man can use is the only real knowledge; the only knowledge that has life and growth in it and converts itself into practical power. The rest hangs like dust about the brain, or dries like raindrops off the stones.
Page 73 - We are guilty of something like a platitude when we say that throughout his after-career a boy, in nine cases out of ten, applies his Latin and Greek to no practical purposes. The remark is trite that in his shop, or his office, in managing his estate or his family, in playing his part as director of a bank or a railway, he is very little aided by this knowledge he took so many years to acquire — so little, that generally the greater part of it drops out of his memory...
Page 73 - If we inquire what is the real motive for giving boys a classical education, we find it to be simply conformity to public opinion.
Page 121 - Spinal Irritation. By William A. Hammond, MD Dyspepsia. By Frank Woodbury, MD The Treatment of the Morphia Habit. By Erlenmeyer. The Etiology, Diagnosis and Therapy of Tuberculosis. By Prof. H. von Ziemssen. SERIES IV. Nervous Syphilis. By HC Wood, MD Education and Culture as correlated to the Health and Diseases of Women.
Page 120 - DETBOWe have made a new departure in the publication of medical books. As you no doubt know, many of the large treatises published, which sell for four or five or more dollars, contain much irrelevant matter of no practical value to the physician, and their high price makes it often impossible for the average practitioner to purchase anything like a complete library. Believing that short practical treatises, prepared by well known authors, containing...
Page 121 - Abdominal Surgery, By Hal C. Wyman, MD Diseases of the Liver. By Dujardin-Beaumetz, MD Hysteria and Epilepsy, By J. Leonard Corning, MD Diseases of the Kidney, By Dujardin-Beaumetz, MD The Theory and Practice of the Ophthalmoscope.
Page 73 - Men dress their children's minds as they do their bodies, in the prevailing fashion. As the Orinoco Indian puts on his paint before leaving his hut, not with a view to any direct benefit, but because he would be ashamed to be seen without it, so a boy's drilling in Latin and Greek is insisted on, not because of their intrinsic value, but that he may not be disgraced by being found ignorant of them — that he may have "the education of a gentleman...
Page 73 - ... children's minds as they do their bodies, in the prevailing fashion. As the Orinoco Indian puts on his paint before leaving his hut, not with a view to any direct benefit, but because he would be ashamed to be seen without it ; so, a boy's drilling in Latin and Greek is insisted on, not because of their intrinsic value, but that he may not be disgraced by being found ignorant of them — that he may have " the education of a gentleman" — the badge marking a certain social position, and bringing...
Page 121 - The Modern Treatment of Headaches. By Allan McLane Hamilton, MD The Modern Treatment of Pleurisy and Pneumonia. By GM Garland, MD Diseases of the Male Urethra.
Page 120 - MD Antiseptic Midwifery. By Henry J. Garrigues, MD On the Determination of the Necessity for Wearing Glasses. By DB St. John Roosa, MD The Physiological, Pathological and Therapeutic Effects of Compressed Air.

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