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THE

WEEKLY VISITOR,

FOR 1835.

THE WORKS OF THE LORD ARE GREAT, SOUGHT OUT OF ALL THEM THAT HAVE PLEASURE THEREIN.

HIS WORK IS HONOURABLE AND GLORIOUS; AND HIS RIGHTEOUSNESS ENDURETH FOR EVER. HE HATH MADE HIS WONDERFUL WORKS TO BE REMEMBERED; THE LORD 18 GRACIOUS, AND FULL OF COMPASSION.-PSALM CXI. 2-4.

WHATSOEVER THINGS ARE TRUE, WHATSOEVER THINGS ARE HONEST, WHATSOEVER THINGS ARE JUST, WHATSOEVER THINGS ARE PURE, WHATSOEVER THINGS ARE LOVELY, WHATSOEVER THINGS ARE OF GOOD REPORT; IF THERE BE ANY VIRTUE, AND IF THERE BE ANY PRAISE, THINK ON THESE THINGS.-PHILIPPIANS IV. 8.

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LONDON:

RELIGIOUS TRACT SOCIETY ; SOLD BY JOHN DAVIS, AT THE DEPOSITORY, 5S, PATERNOSTER ROW,

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GREENWICH CASTLE, KENT. completion until the time of William and The above engraving represents Greenwich Mary, when it was converted to its present Castle, which formerly occupied the site of use, as an hospital for the reception and the present Royal Observatory, commonly comfortable maintenance of decayed seaknown as Flamstead House ; for the erec- men of the royal navy. tion of which, this castle was taken down Early in the fifteenth century, the manor in the year 1675.

of Greenwich was granted to Humphrey Greenwich appears to have been a royal Duke of Gloucester, by his kinsman King residence so early as the time of Edward Henry v.; and in 1434, the duke en1., and long continued a favourite retreat closed and ornamentally planted some of royalty. It was the birth-place of land, consisting of about two hundred King Henry vill., Queen Mary, and Eli- acres, now called Greenwich Park. Also zabeth ; and here the youthful monarch, on the most elevated point of the park he Edward vi., breathed his last. After the erected a tower for his occasional residence, restoration of Charles 11., the old palace called Greenwich Castle, which is reprewas found to be in a very dilapidated sented in our engraving. state, arising partly from time, and neglect Greenwich Castie appears to have been in making the necessary repairs during the variously employed, sometimes as a place civil wars and the commonwealth. It was of defence, sometimes as a residence for taken down, and a new one upon a mag- the younger branches of the royal family, nificent scale commenced from the designs and at others a kind of state prison. Mary, of, Webb, the son-in-law of Inigo Jones. one of the daughters of Edward iv., as Part of it was erected, (forming with addi- also Elizabeth, Countess of Suffolk, died tions the west wing of the present hospital,) here; the former in 1482, and the latter in in which the king occasionally resided, but 1633. It was the occasional residence of no farther progress was made towards its Henry Howard, Earl of Northampton, in

VOL. III.

A

the reign of James 1., and the prison of the But suppose you did give a blanket last Earl of Leicester, in the reign of Queen year to some one who wanted it, thereby Elizabeth. Likewise, in the disputes be- expending a few shillings in the luxury of tween King Charles 1. and his parliament doing good-have you slept the less warm it was used as a place of defence.

for it, or been made poorer by the deed ? The castle appears to have been occasion You know that you have not; and, most ally employed as a banquetting house, es- likely, since then you have expended ten pecially during the period when Black- times the amount .in' indulgences which heath was the scene of the tournaments, yield not half the gratification that a deed and Greenwich palace of the grand festi- of benevolence produces. vals given by King Henry vini.

Think not that your gift of last year In the foreground of the very curious old should withhold your hand from bestowing print, from whence our engraving was co- in the present one.

O no! God in his pied, two ladies are represented, one of mercy has not kept back his bounty from whom is masked, and they appear to be you; neither should you withhold your hand approaching the castle to join in the fes- from doing good. Strengthen then the tivities of the place.

weak, bind up the bruised, encourage the At the left hand corner of the print are the broken-hearted, relieve the poor, and give following lines :

a pair of shoes to some poverty-stricken "Behould by Prospect, with what Art

being who cannot afford to buy them. Fayre Greenwich Castle Pleasantly. If, accustomed to be well shod during the A House of Banquet, neare and part winter, you have a good stock of shoes and of Thames and London, How they ly."

boots to defend your feet from the searchIt is to be regretted that there is no date ing influence of the dissolving snow, you to this print; but the address of the pub- can hardly imagine what is endured by lisher is as follows :

those who have wet feet from morning to “ London. Printed and sould by Peter night. Many a hapless fellow.creature, Stent at the Crowne in Giltspur-street be- brought up with care, and watched over twixt New Gate and Pie Corner."

with tenderness, is reduced so low, that the Greenwich Castle was removed, at the possession of a good pair of shoes would be suggestion of Sir Christopher Wren, in the considered a luxury, a positive blessing: year 1675, for the erection of the present Think of your own comforts, and of others' building, the Royal Observatory, which it deprivations, and shut not up your heart is our intention to describe in future to the wants of the destitute, but give a numbers.

pair of shoes, or something towards enabling
some poor creature who stands in need of

them, to obtain such a comfort.
SHOES
Read the words of scripture,

" Whoso And is winter really come again ? sharp, hath this world's good, and seeth his brofrosty, bleak-blowing winter! Yes, indeed, ther have need, and shutteth up his bowels it is true. More than three hundred and of compassion from him, how dwelleth sixty-five times has the earth turned on its the love of God in him ?” and then say, axis, in its journeyings round the sun, can any one go guiltlessly through the since the Weekly Visitor, pleading the world, treading on comfortable carpets cause of the poor, urged those who abound within doors, and well defended from ined in earthly comforts to give a blanket to clemency without, while he sees, and atthe destitute and shivering being who tempts not to relieve the misery and wretchknew not the luxury of a warm and com- edness of those who suffer from the want fortable bed. And now, again, when the of shoes? raw, keen air, the descending snow, the How many hours of discomfort, how sudden thaw, the wet slippery sloppy many days of afliction, yea, how many pathway, await the sons and daughters years of disease and pain have been brought of poverty and affliction, the Weekly on by persons getting wet in their feet ! Visitor again raises its voice on behalf of and will you let those who have fireless the needy and destitute.

habitations, and blanketless beds, go almost Perhaps, reader, the chapter on “Blank- shoeless through their plashy pathways, ets,” last year, did not reach your eyes, or while perhaps lambswool stockings and possibly, did not influence your heart; in strong well-made boots defend your feet either case let the present appeal melt your from the least inconvenience ? breast

have humanity, you will not, and if you " To do some gentle deed of charity." have christian charity, you cannot refuse

If you

corner.

your aid; but, as you have ability and see, and trials that every one, possessing opportunity, you will “ do good unto all the ability, ought to endeavour to remove ; men, especially to those who are of the but we are too apt, in such cases, to call household of faith.”

upon others to act, and to excuse ourIf your eye be quick to discern, and selves. We can cry loud enough, your heart prompt to feel the distresses of others, you will not long lack opportuni

“ Take physic, Pomp, ties to relieve them. Look around at the Expose thyself to feel what wretches feel,” throngs that continually crowd the populous city or town ; regard not only their with affected virtuous indignation against faces, but their feet; not only their clothes, hardheartedness, and yet be content to but their shoes also, and you will be remain inactive ; like the pharisees of times surprised at the wretched shifts to which gone by, who bound heavy burdens on many of them are driven. It is enough to men's shoulders, while they themselves make the heart ache to see the miserable moved them not with one of their fingers. plight in which hundreds pursue their If, selfishly regardless of others' wants, daily calling. Here is a ragged lad we are liberally providing for our own dragging through the miry street, with comforts ; if, casting aside shoes but halfa pair of old shoes big enough for his worn out, which so many people would father. There is a poor girl, who has thankfully receive, we are ordering new contrived to tie on her feet with pack- ones, to gratify our pride, we deserve, instring, another pair, already worn out by deed, to be visited with calamity. Wonher mother ; and yonder is a barelegged derfully quick-sighted is a lame man in and barefooted being, between whose de observing all who walk on crutches ; benefenceless toes the mud oozes as he paddles volently susceptible are we, after a fit of onward through the descending rain. the tooth-ache, to the pains of all visited Look towards the chandler's shop at the with a like calamity; and were we com

Mark that meagre and tattered pelled, for a single day, to wade through the mother, with a child in her arms, wending miry streets without shoes, or with such only her way there for a rushlight, paddling on our feet as freely let in the water, such an through the snowy puddle, with an old appeal as the present would be useless, pair of thin-soled shoes on her feet, which for gladly should we contribute to the cost only one and ninepence when they were removal of trials which now, perhaps, we

Do not talk about her imprudence, pass without pity. and her improvidence; who is there in this To a poor person, a strong, well-made wide world that has not been imprudent pair of shoes is at all times a valuable and improvident? David, perhaps, you present, but doubly so in the inclement seawill admit, was as faithful a servant of son of winter. Be persuaded, then, to assist God as you are, and he says, “ If thou, some one,

whom

you

think worthy of your Lord, shouldst mark_iniquities, O Lord, kindness, in attaining so desirable a benefit. who shall stand ?" Does it become us, Give not to those who frequent the pawnthen, to be severe, in such an inclement broker's and gin-shop, for though you may season, on our fellow-sinners, when we deplore their misery, you cannot relieve it. have been visited with unmerited mercy ? Your bounty would only afford them a Cast another glance at the poor wretch, as short-lived and guilty respite from their she stoops to adjust her brown paper increasing cares. Give to those, who are sock, and to pull up the trodden down heel struggling hard to procure comforts, which, of her saturated shoe, and say whether the when attained, will be highly valued, and heart is to be envied that does not yearn carefully preserved ; and when the snows to lessen her wretchedness, and to increase are abroad, and the rains descend, when her comforts? You may not know whether the wintry winds whistle around your she has always acted with discretion but cheerful habitation, you will not regret you do know that she is walking in a mise having contributed to the comforts of the rable puddle, and that she has a wretched destitute. All the kindly feelings you may pair of shoes on her feet.

indulge in towards the poor, are not equal Neither must you say that this picture to the gift of a single pair of shoes : is overdrawn; on the contrary, it is " faith- but while I mention this gift in particular, ful to a fault,” it is sketched from the life ; | I would exhort to all deeds of kindness. it is unmingled, unembellished truth, which “ Blessed is he that considereth the poor : you have only to look for to behold. the Lord will deliver him in time of These are sights which every one may trouble."

G. M.

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