North American Journal of Homoeopathy

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Page 320 - Thesaurus A THESAURUS OF MEDICAL WORDS AND PHRASES. By WILFRED M. BARTON, MD, Assistant to Professor of Materia Medica and Therapeutics, Georgetown University, Washington, DC ; and WALTER A.
Page 190 - A REFERENCE HANDBOOK OF THE MEDICAL SCIENCES EMBRACING THE ENTIRE RANGE OF SCIENTIFIC AND PRACTICAL MEDICINE AND ALLIED SCIENCE. By various writers.
Page 191 - THE INTERNATIONAL TEXT-BOOK OF SURGERY. In Two Volumes. By American and British Authors. Edited by J. COLLINS WARREN, MD, LL.
Page 487 - The accepted definition of a homoeopathic physician is "one who adds to his knowledge of medicine a special knowledge of homoeopathic therapeutics and observes the law of similia. All that pertains to the great field of medical learning is his by tradition, by inheritance, by right.
Page 718 - Medical Jurisprudence and Toxicology. By HENRY C. CHAPMAN, MD, Professor of Institutes of Medicine and Medical Jurisprudence, Jefferson Medical College of Philadelphia.
Page 444 - Nose Atlas and Epitome of Diseases of the Mouth, Pharynx, and Nose. By DR. L. GRUNWALD, of Munich. From the Second Revised and Enlarged German Edition. Edited, with additions, by JAMES E. NEWCOMB, MD, Instructor in Laryngology, Cornell University Medical School. With 102 illustrations on 42 colored lithographic plates, 41 text-cuts, and 219 pages of text.
Page 718 - The Care of the Baby. — A Manual for Mothers and Nurses, containing Practical Directions for the Management of Infancy and Childhood in Health and in Disease...
Page 719 - AN AMERICAN TEXT=BOOK OF LEGAL MEDICINE AND TOXICOLOGY. Edited by FREDERICK PETERSON, MD, Chief of Clinic, Nervous Department, College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York ; and WALTER S. HAINES, MD, Professor of Chemistry, Pharmacy, and Toxicology, Rush Medical College, Chicago.
Page 603 - ... see the person fall a lifeless corpse ; and you infer, from all these circumstances, that there was a ball discharged from the gun which entered his body and caused his death, because such is the usual and natural cause of such an effect. But you did not see the ball leave the gun, pass through the air, and enter the body of the slain ; and your testimony to the fact of killing is, therefore, only inferential, — in other words, circumstantial.
Page 192 - Fellow of the New York Academy of Medicine, etc. With an Introductory Note by JOHN H. MUSSER, MD, Professor of Clinical Medicine, University of Pennsylvania.

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