The American Practitioner, Volume 39

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Page 588 - The power of the State to provide for the general welfare of its people authorizes it to prescribe all such regulations as, in its judgment, will secure or tend to secure them against the consequences of ignorance and incapacity as well as of deception and fraud.
Page 193 - For certainly it is excellent discipline for an author to feel that he must say all he has to say in the fewest possible words, or his reader is sure to skip them ; and in the plainest possible words, or his reader will certainly misunderstand them. Generally, also, a downright fact may be told in a plain way ; and we want downright facts at present more than anything else.
Page 588 - Here all vocations are open to every one on like conditions. All may be pursued as sources of livelihood, some requiring years of study and great learning for their successful prosecution. The interest, or, as it is sometimes termed, the estate acquired in them, that is, the right to continue their prosecution, is often of great value to the possessors, and cannot be arbitrarily taken from them, any more than their real or personal property can be thus taken.
Page 451 - A Text-Book of Practical Therapeutics. With especial reference to the Application of Remedial Measures to Disease and their Employment upon a Rational Basis. By Hobart Amory Hare, MD, B. Sc., Professor of Therapeutics and Materia Medica in the Jefferson Medical College of Philadelphia ; Physician to St. Agnes...
Page iv - ... figs. It is recommended by many of the most eminent physicians, and used by millions of families with entire satisfaction. It has gained its great reputation, with the medical profession, by reason of the acknowledged skill and care exercised by the California Fig Syrup Co. in securing the laxative principles of the senna, by methods of its own, and presenting them in the best and most convenient form.
Page 589 - The nature and extent of the qualifications required must depend primarily upon the judgment of the State as to their necessity. If they are appropriate to the calling or profession, and attainable by reasonable study or application, no objection to their validity can be raised because of their stringency or difficulty. It is only when they have no relation to such calling or profession, or are unattainable by such reasonable study and application, that they can operate to deprive one of his right...
Page 321 - And though this world, with devils filled, Should threaten to undo us, We will not fear, for God hath willed His truth to triumph through us. The prince of darkness grim, We tremble not for him; His rage we can endure, For lo! his doom is sure; One little word shall fell him.
Page x - ... antikamnia its action is all that could be desired. In the grinding pains which precede and follow labor, and the uterine contractions which often lead to abortion, in tic douloureux, brachialgia, cardialgia.
Page x - We meet with many cases in practice suffering intensely from pain, where from an idiosyncrasy or some other reason it is not advisable to give morphine or opium by the mouth, or morphine...
Page 588 - ... deception and fraud. As one means to this end it has been the practice of different States, from time immemorial, to exact in many pursuits a certain degree of skill and learning upon which the community may confidently rely, their possession being generally ascertained upon an examination of parties by competent persons, or inferred from a certificate to them in the form of a diploma, or license from an institution established for instruction on the subjects, scientific and otherwise, with which...

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