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[Inclosure 1.]

Translation from Peking Gazette, December 31, 1901.
On the 18th of the eleventh moon the following imperial edict, was received:

"According to a memorial of Prince Ch’ing and others, the ministers of Great Britain and the United States have requested that Chang Yin-huan, who had suffered punishment, might be rehabilitated, etc.

“Let Chang Yin-huan, deceased, formerly the senior vice-president of the Board of revenue, as a mark of special mercy, be restored to his former official status in order to the promotion of friendly feelings.

“Respect this.”

(Inclosure 2.)

Foreign office to Mr. Conger.

F. 0. No. 312.]

Prince of Ch’ing, imperial commissioner, president of the board of foreign affairs, and Wang Wen-shao, acting plenipotentiary, minister of the grand council, grand secretary, minister of the board of foreign affairs, etc., send this dispatch:

We have the honor to acknowledge the receipt some time since of a communication from your excellency, concerning the punishment of the former minister (to the United States), Chang Yin-huan, saying that your Government earnestly requested that he might be rehabilitated and expressing the hope that we would memorialize the Throne, praying that his original rank might be restored, etc.

We, prince and minister, thereupon prepared and submitted a special memorial, and on the 19th of the eleventh moon (December 29, 1901) we received by telegraph an imperial edict, as follows:

“The ministers of Great Britain and the United States requested that Chang Yinhuan, who has suffered punishment, should be rehabilitated, etc. Let Chang Yinhuan, deceased, formerly the senior vice-president of the board of revenue, as a mark of special mercy, be restored to his former rank, in order to the promotion of friendly feeling.

“Respect this.”

As in duty bound, we have reverently copied this edict and now transmit it to your excellency for your consideration, and trust that you will forward it to your Government.

Kuang-hsu, XXVII year, eleventh moon, 23d day (January 2, 1902).

Mr. Conger to Mr. Hay. No. 924.]

LEGATION OF THE UNITED STATES,

Peking, February 25, 1902. Sir: I have the honor to inclose copies of a telegram received from the children of the late Chang Yin-huan and of my reply thereto, and to be, etc.,

E. H. CONGER.

(Inclosure 1.]

Chang Kai-chin et al. to Mr. Conger.
[Telegram.]

FATSHAN, February 23, 1902. The children of Chang Yin-huan offer their hearty thanks for the kindness shown to their deceased father.

CHANG KAI-CHIN.

[Inclosure 2.)

Mr. Conger to Chang Kui-chin.

[Telegram.)

LEGATION OF THE UNITED STATES,

Peking, February 24, 1902. I am very much pleased to receive telegram of thanks from children of Chang Yin-huan. " Appreciate it very highly.

CONGER.

RETURN OF CHINESE COURT TO PEKING.

Mr. Conger to Mr. Ilay.

[Telegram.-Paraphrase.)

LEGATION OF THE UNITED STATES,

Peking, January 7, 1902. (Mr. Conger reports that the Chinese court entered the imperial palace at 2 o'clock p. m., January 7, and that perfect order prevails.)

Mr. Conger to Mr. Ilay.

No. 872)

LEGATION OF THE UNITED STATES,

Peking, January 7, 1902. Sir: I have the honor to confirm my telegram" of to-day announcing the return of the imperial court to Peking this afternoon, and to inclose copies of imperial edict and correspondence with the foreign office in relation thereto.

In compliance with the request of the foreign office, that on the day of the court's return and that previous, foreigners would not use the imperial way, I addressed a circular letter to all Americans residing here, expressing the hope that the wishes of the Chinese Government would be respected. I am glad to say that this was generally done. The soldiers of the various legation guards were kept within their respective camps.

There was, however, no restriction placed upon the observation of the actual entry of the court so far as foreigners were concerned, and a great many availed themselves of the opportunity to see it from the city wall and other points of vantage. A courteous note was addressed to the legations, stating that provisions would be made for the comfort and convenience of such of their personnel as might desire to witness the imperial cortège, and most of the legation ladies, accompanied by secretaries and interpreters, accepted this invitation. The foreign office provided an escort for them, and they were conducted to one of the principal silk stores on the Chien men Great street in the Chinese city, from the balcony of which they were enabled to see all that passed. Every possible courtesy was shown them by those detailed to act as their escort.

Their majesties reached Machia-pu outside the wall of the Chinese city by train about 1 o'clock. Here they remained for some time to

a Printed, ante.

rest. The foreign-drilled troops of Viceroy Yüan Shih-k’ai and Generals Ma and Chang were drawn up in double line from the gates of the palace to Machia-pu. As the imperial party passed, the Chinese officials and the troops stationed along the route knelt, but large bodies of troops marched as an escort before and behind the imperial cortège.

As the Empress Dowager was borne past the balcony on which the party from the legations stood, she leaned forward in her chair and returned their salutations with evident cordiality.

The military and civic parade was in every way creditable. Perfect order prevailed, not only along the route, but throughout the city.

Some time before the death of Li Hung-chang an informal request was made to the ministers to participate in the reception to the court outside the city on its return, but, as several of the ministers had not presented their credentials and for other reasons, this was not deemed advisable. Having thus refused to participate in the reception officially, they refrained from attending it out of mere curiosity: They did not, therefore, accompany the ladies and their staffs to the place of observation.

As indicated by the inclosed imperial edict, an audience will probably be granted to the diplomatic body at an early date. The Empress Dowager also expressed her desire to receive the wives of the foreign ministers. The tone of this edict is one of unusual friendliness.

On the 2d instant the ministers of the foreign office and the members of the various boards made their usual New Year's call upon the legation. They came in two parties, one headed by Prince Ch’ing, the other by Wang Wen-shao. During the call frequent reference was made by them to the friendly attitude of the United States toward China throughout her recent troubles and in the subsequent negotiations.

On the same day Generals Ma and Chang and His Excellency Hu, military governor of Peking, called at the legation and also upon Major Robertson, commanding the United States legation guard. I have, etc.,

E. H. CONGER.

(Inclosure 1.)

The foreign office to Mr. Conger. F.O., No. 311.)

We have received from the yamen of the general commandant of the gendarmerie a note saying that, as Their Majesties are returning to the capital, it behooves those in charge of the roads to put them in thorough repair in order to manifest proper respect, but that the soldiers and merchants of the various countries, going daily to and from the trains, pass in and out of the Cheng Yang Gate (Ch’ien Men), there was danger that such a multitude of carts and horses would cut up the road reserved for Their Majesties and hinder this very important work. They therefore request that we forward their statement to the several ministers of the foreign powers residing at Pekin, and ask them to notify their soldiers and merchants that on the day of the court's return, and that preceding it, not to travel over the Imperial Way, etc. Having received this request, we have transmitted it to your excellency for your consideration.

We avail, etc.
Eleventh moon, 23d day (January 2, 1902).
Cards of Prince Ch'ing, Na-T’ung, Wang Wen-shao, and Lien-Fang.

[Inclosure 2.-Circular.)

Mr. ('onger to Americur citizens.

LEGATION OF THE UNITED STATES,

Peking, January 4, 1902. To all American citizens in Peking:

I am direct d by the minister to cause to be circulated among the American citi. zens resident in Peking the attached copy of a note received from the foreign office in regard to the return to Peking of the imperial court.

The minister of the United States expressed the hope that the wishes of the Chinese Government in this matter will be respected.

W. E. BAINBRIDGE, Secretary.

[Inclosure 3.)

Mr. Conger to Major Robertson.

Mis., No. 1059.]

LEGATION OF THE UNITED STATES,

Peking, January 4, 1902. Sir: I inclose to you herewith a copy of a note received from the foreign office regarding the preparations making for the return of the court to Peking, and requesting that on the day of the court's return and that preceding it foreign soldiers and others be not permitted to travel over the Imperial Way, etc.

I have to request that proper orders may be issued to secure compliance with this request on the part of the United States legation guard. I am, etc.,

E. H. CONGER.

[Inclosure 4.)

Mr. Conger to Major Robertson.

Mis., No. 1063. ]

LEGATION OF THE UNITED STATES,

Peking, January 6, 1902. Sir: The Chinese Government, in order to avoid every possibility of accident or trouble, have requested that the legation guards should be kept within their several camps during the entry of the imperial cortege on the 7th of January.

I have to request, therefore, that you will take this apparently wise precaution with the men under your command. "This, of course, does not apply to sentinels on regular posts. I am, etc.,

E. H. CONGER.

[Inclosure 5.)

Orders to lnited States legation guard.

GENERAL ORDERS,

UNITED STATES LEGATION GUARD,
No. 1.

Peking, China, January 4, 1902. In compliance with the request of the United States minister, all officers, soldiers, and civilian employees of this command are forbidden to travel on or over the Imperial Way (Chien Men street) on the day of the arrival of the imperial Chinese court and the day preceding. Notice of these dates will be given later.

E. B. ROBERTSON, Major, Ninth Infantry, Commanding.

GENERAL ORDERS,
}

UNITED STATES LEGATION GUARD,
No. 2.

Peking, China, January 6, 1902. In compliance with the request of the United States minister, the troops of this command are forbidden to leave the barracks to-morrow during the entry of the imperial Chinese court.

[Inclosure 6.]

The foreign office to Mr. Conger. The Board of foreign affairs has the honor to inform your excellency that on the 24th of the eleventh moon of the XXVII year of Kuanghsu they received the following imperial edict:

“We have received the commands of Her Imperial Majesty the Empress Dowager, Es follows:

** The Government and the friendly powers have renewed their pledges, revived good feeling, and strengthened their cordial relations, which is a cause of mutual congratulation. The court being now about to return to Peking, it is urgently necessary to fix an early date when the ministers of the various powers may be received in audience, in order to give due recognition to the importance of our international relations and due weight to diplomatic affairs. After a date shall have been selected His Majesty the Emperor will receive the ministers of the various powers in audience in the Ch’ien Ch’ing Throne Hall. On a former occasion the wives of the foreign ministers paid a visit to the palace, which was a praiseworthy and courteous action, and one that was deeply appreciated. We now propose that a date shall also be fixed for an audience to be granted to the wives of the foreign ministers in the Ning Shou Throne Hall, in order that there may be a mutual manifestation of friendly feeling, etc.'

* Respect this.”

Besides memorializing the throne in regard to the fixing of a date, of which we shall inform you later, our board as in duty bound has reverently copied the edict and transmits the same to your excellency that you may respectfully comply therewith.

Kuang-hsu XXVII year, eleventh moon, 26th day. (January 5, 1902.)

[Inclosure No. 7.]

Mr. Conger to the foreign office. F. 0., No. 330.]

LEGATION OF THE UNITED STATES,

Peking, January 6, 1902. I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of the dispatch of your highness and your excellencies of the 2d instant, requesting me to notify my nationals that on the day of the return of the court to Peking and on that preceding it the Chien Men and the Chien Men street will be closed to all traffic, etc.

I have the honor to inform your highness and your excellencies that I have complied with your request. I avail myself of this occasion to renew to your highness, etc.,

E. II. CONGER.

MUTUAL EMBARRASSMENTS OF UNITED STATES AND RUSSIAN OFFICIALS AT NIUCHWANG - CONFLICT BETWEEN UNITED STATES SEAMEN AND RUSSIAN OFFICIALS – DELAYS IN TRANSMISSION OF TELEGRAMS, ETC. 4

Mr. Conger to Mr. Hay.

(Telegram.--Paraphrase.)
LEGATION OF THE UNITED STATES,

Peking, January 7, 1902. (Mr. Conger reports that a memorandum has been left with him by the Russian minister reporting three attacks by American sailors on Russian soldiers at Niuchwang, one of the latter being wounded, and

an See also under Russia, page 916. FR 1902, PT 1-10

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