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DOMINICAN REPUBLIC.

VISIT OF GEN. MAXIMO GOMEZ TO SANTO DOMINGO, DURING

WHICH RELICS OF CHRISTOPHER COLUMBUS WERE EXHIBITED.

Mr. Powell to Mr. Ilay.

No. 306, Santo Domingo series.]

LEGATION OF THE UNITED STATES,

Santo Domingo, February 24, 1902. SIR: I have the honor to state to the Department the arrival of Gen. Maximo Gomez, Cuban general, in this city. The Government is extending to him its hospitality as a mark of honor and respect. As a testimonial of their regard, they have allowed him to view one of their sacred treasures, by exposing to him the casket containing the bones of Christopher Columbus and permitting him to handle the same. The casket containing the relics of the discoverer of America rests under a fine monument in the cathedral in this city. Your representative also had the honor to be invited to be present, and at the time was introduced to General Gomez.

For further information of the Department [I would say that), these relics are inclosed in a casket made of composite metal, the box being 18 inches by 10 inches, and about 12 inches deep. There are numbers of bones in the box. It also contains the ball that was said to be imbed. ded in the leg of Columbus, received in an engagement, and never extracted. They claim from this evidence presented that the present relics are the mortal remains of the early discoverer, and not those that were removed from Havana a few years ago; one of these relics your representative had the pleasure of holding for a few moments.

This metal box is inclosed in another having glass sides, and the two in a strong steel casket, protected by doors of the same metal, the whole resting, as I have stated, under a handsome marble monument inside of the main entrance of tbe cathedral which bears his name.

I am informed this was the fifth time that these relics have been exposed to public view. After a short time, to allow the general pub. lic to see them, they were returned to their resting place. I have, etc.,

W. F. POWELL.

381

PROTECTION DENIED PORTO RICANS ENGAGED IN INSURREC

TION AGAINST DOMINICAN GOVERNMENT.

Mr. Powell to Mr. Hay.

No. 349. Santo Domingo series.]

LEGATION OF THE UNITED STATES,

Santo Domingo City, April 12, 1902. Sir: I have the honor to state a Porto Rican, named Maximo Mongé, engaged in business in Azua, one of the places where the recent disturbance occurred, was sent by the military governor of that district to the capital a prisoner, charged as being one of the participators in the recent troubles at that place. Upon his arrival the Government gave to him his liberty with order that he should report daily to the military authorities. He called upon the consul-general, Mr. C. L. Maxwell, stating that he had been illegally arrested, that he had not broken the laws of the Republic, and knew no reason why the authorities should take him from his home and business and send him here. Mr. Maxwell referred him to your representative. After hearing his statement I addressed a note to the minister of foreign relations requesting that he furnish me the cause that led to his arrest and upon what charge he was held. The minister immediately replied, stating that Mongé had been sent to the capital, as he was engaged in the recent disturbance there, and requesting that he be not allowed to return. I afterwards called upon the minister and learned from him that meetings of an insurrectionary character had been held at his (Mongé's) house, and that he had been an active agent between certain persons now in prison from that place who had been engaged in the attempt to overthrow the present government; that he had been cautioned by the military authorities in regard to these meetings, and that he had replied nothing could be done with him, as he was a Porto Rican and under the protection of our Government. Finding he would not discontinue his efforts in this direction he was arrested and sent here, and, as I have stated, released upon the promise that he would daily report to the military authorities. The minister also informed me that it was the intention of the Government to send him from the Republic. I am inclined to believe the statement made to me to be true.

As all trouble in that direction is about over, I have requested of the minister to allow him to return to his family. This he has agreed to do after affairs become more tranquil in that section. He will possibly be required to remain here a few weeks longer, and then be allowed to return. I was also informed at this interview that a number of Porto Ricans were engaged in this insurrection, some entering the ranks of the insurgents, and requested to know of me if my Government would protect them in such a case. I have informed him that my Government did not seek to protect those engaged in rebellion against his Government. I requested of him to ascertain before taking such measures if such reports concerning these persons were true; if so, my Government would not interpose any objection to them carrying into execution their proposed action. I have, etc.,

W.F. POWELL.

[Inclosure 1.)

Mr. Powell to Dr. Henriquez. No. 200.]

LEGATION OF THE UNITED STATES,

Santo Domingo City, April 7, 1902. Sir: I have been informed that you have under arrest, by your Government, a Porto Rican citizen by the name of Maximo Mongé, in business at Azua, the place where he was arrested, and forwarded from there to the capital.

I would be glad if you would inform me what are the charges against him, what laws has he broken, or with what crime is he charged? Accept, etc.,

W. F. POWELL.

[Inclosure 2.—Translation.)

Dr. Henriquez to Mr. Powell.
Book B, No. 622.] DOMINICAN REPUBLIC, MINISTRY OF FOREIGN RELATIONS,

San Domingo, April 7, 1902. MR. MINISTER: I have the honor to acknowledge to you the receipt of your attentive note of to-day's date.

The Mr. Maximo Mongé, native of Porto Rico, and a resident of Azua, is complicated in the grave disturbances that have occurred in Azna and Barahona.

The governor of Azna considers him exceedingly dangerous in said place, and has sent him from there because his presence is antagonistic to the governor, and the minister of the interior has communicated with this office and desires that the said culprit leave the territory of the Republic from the moment he violates the laws of hospitality, coming in contact with Dominicans who unhappily forget their obligations as citizens and pretend to plant anarchism in the soil of the country. I salute, etc.,

HENRIQUEZ Y CARVAJAL.

Mr. Hay to Mr. Powell.
No. 146, San Domingo series.] DEPARTMENT OF STATE,

Washington, May 1, 1902. SIR: I have to acknowledge the receipt of your No. 349, San Domingo series, of the 12th ultimo, reporting that you had examined the case of Maximo Mongé, a citizen of Porto Rico, charged with aiding and abetting the insurrection, and threatened with expulsion from the country, and have advised the Dominican foreign office that this Government would not extend its protection to citizens of the United States or of Porto Rico engaged in insurrection against the Government of the Dominican Republic. Your action is approved. I am, etc.,

JOHN HAY.

PROTECTION OF CUBAN INTERESTS BY UNITED STATES

CONSULAR OFFICIALS.

Mr. Powell to Mr. Hay. No. 389, San Domingo series.]

LEGATION OF THE UNITED STATES,

Port au Prince, Haiti, August 13, 1902. SIR: I have the honor to state to the Department that the present mail from Santo Domingo has brought to this legation the consent of the Dominican Government to the request of the Cuban Government that the United States consular officers in that Republic should represent Cuban commercial interests until such time as it can establish a Cuban consular service.

I have the honor to inclose the correspondence that has passed between that Government and this legation concerning this matter. I have, etc.,

W. F. POWELL.

[Inclosure 1.]

Mr. Powell to Mr. Sanchez.

No. 217.)

LEGATION OF THE UNITED STATES,

Port au Prince, Haiti, July 9, 1902. Sir: I have the honor to call your excellency's attention to a request that has been made to my Government by His Excellency Señor Don Tomás Estrada Palma, President of the Republic of Cuba, requesting that the United States consular officers in your Republic be charged with the protection of the citizens of that Republic resident in Santo Domingo, and also the commercial interests of the said Republic, until such time as Cuban consular officers can be appointed.

I would be glad to have you inform me if this request of His Excellency Señor Palma, meets with the approval of your excellency's Government, in order that the necessary instructions shall be transmitted from this office to the United States consular officers in your Republic. May I also request of your excellency your reply by cable, in order that I may communicate with our consuls at an early day. Kindly accept, etc.,

W. F. POWELL.

[Inclosure 2.— Translation.] Mr. Sanchez to Mr. Powell.

DOMINICAN REPUBLIC, DEPARTMENT OF FOREIGN RELATIONS,

Santo Domingo, August 1, 1902. MR. CHALÉ D'AFFAIRES: I have the honor to bring to your knowledge that I have given opportunely account to the Dominican Government of your kind note of the date of July 9, No. 217, informing us that a request has been made to your Government by His Excellency Mr. Tomás Estrada Palma, President of the Republic of Cuba, soliciting that the consular officials of the United States in the Dominican Republic might be charged with the protection of the citizens of that Republic residing in Santo Domingo, and also of the commercial interests of the said Republic, up to the time in which he can appoint Cuban consular officials.

The Dominican Government accepts at once and with the best good will the said representation of the Cuban interests and the protection of the citizens of that Republic by that of the United States, and desires that the formal notice be made to Mr. Tomás Estrada Palma, through your office, to consider complete the request to the purpose in the case of the representation and protection announced. I salute you, etc.,

JUAN F. SANCHEZ.

ACCIDENT TO PRESIDENT ROOSEVELT.

Mr. Vasquez to Mr. Hay.

[Telegram.]
LEGATION OF THE DOMINICAN REPUBLIC,

New York, September 24, 1902. Sincerely regret accident to President Roosevelt, and hope there is no danger for him.

F. L. VASQUEZ,

Chargé d'Affaires.

Mr. Adee to Señor Vasquez.

No. 19.]

DEPARTMENT OF STATE,

Washington, September 26, 1902. Sir: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your telegram of the 24th instant, expressing your regret to learn of the operation performed on the President as a result of the accident at Pittsfield.

I have the honor to express the Department's appreciation of your courteous telegram, and to assure you that the reports of the President's condition continue satisfactory. Accept, etc.,

ALVEY A. ADEE,

Acting Secretary. FR 1902, PT 1—25

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