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The young man was a member of the civil service of the Transvaal, and begs that we endeavor to secure parole, that he may return to the Cape Colony in order that he may make provision for his family. His state of mind is pitiful, as you may judge by the following, quoted from his last letter to me:

“Life here is very monotonous and I feel the confinement very much, having now been a prisoner since the early stages of the war. My wife, thank God, is well, but the two little daughters and the son are ill.

“The war may drag on for another six or eight months, and to stay here all that time will drive me mad.

It is simply a desire on my part to return to the Cape Colony to make provision for my loved ones. Last year this time I was happy in the possession of a loving wife and children and a pretty home in Doornfontein, one of the suburbs of Johannesburg; now, how different. My home is looted and the wife and children are refugees among hundreds of others."

He closes his letter with an appeal to “not forget your kinsman, who is eating his heart out on the prison island of the South Atlantic.”

This young man is about 30 years of age. His name is William Smith, and he is my first cousin, being a son of my father's sister.

I feel that I may approach you in this matter on the common ground of humanity,

By granting my request you will not only confer a great favor on me, which I earnestly appreciate, but also upon over a score of this poor boy's relatives, who are, with me, interested in this matter. Very truly, yours,

ANDREW J. MULCARE.

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[Inclosure 2.)

Mr. Hay to Mr. Wilson.

DEPARTMENT OF STATE, Washington, October 16, 1900. SIR: I am in receipt of your letter of the 15th, in which, referring to the letter you transmit from a constituent touching the release on parole of the deported Boer prisoner, a relative of the writer, you ask the Department's aid in the matter.

Pending consideration of your request, I have the honor to inquire whether the young man, Mr. William Smith, in whose behalf the interposition of this Government is solicited to obtain his release on parole from confinement on the island of St. Helena, is a citizen of the United States or was ever domiciled in this country. The statements in the letter of your constituent (Mr. Andrew J. Mulcare) do not make it clear whether Mr. Smith was a citizen of the South African Republic or an "outlander” employed at Johannesburg, who, on the outbreak of the war, took refuge with his family in the Cape Colony. I have, etc.,

JOHN HAY.

(Inclosure 3.)

Mr. Adee to Mr. Mulcare.

DEPARTMENT OF STATE, Washington, October 20, 1900. Sir: Your letter of the 11th instant addressed to the President has been referred to this Department. It refers to the case of William Smith, a deported Boer prisoner, whose release you seek on parole, and is a replica of the letter addressed by you to the Hon. Frank E. Wilson and by him sent bither with a request for the Department's aid in the matter.

Mr. Wilson has probably communicated to you the Department's reply a of October 16, but in case he has not I inclose a copy for your information.

You will see that it is essential that Mr. Smith's American citizenship or domicile be established before the Department can give the matter consideration. I am, etc.,

ALVEY A. ADEE,

Acting Secretary.

a Printed, supra.

[Inclosure 4.]

Mr. Mulcare to Mr. Adee.

BROOKLYN, N. Y., October 23, 1900. SIR: I have your esteemed favor of the 20th instant in the matter of obtaining parole for William Smith. Also copy of letter addressed to the Hon. Frank E. Wilson.

Prior to the receipt of your letter I had an interview with Mr. Wilson regarding the information required.

My cousin, William Smith, is not a citizen of the United States. He is a native of South Africa, but I do not know just when he was born. His mother was a native of Ireland and his father of Germany. He never resided here, and the only time he spent in this country was on a visit of several months' duration.

I am aware that his release can not be asked for in any sense as a right, but I do earnestly request, in behalf of over a score of his relatives who are citizens of this glorious country, the good offices of our Government toward securing his release.

I beg to emphasize the fact that he desires to return to the Cape Colony and not to the late scenes of the war.

At the outbreak of the war Mr. Smith was employed in the post-office department at Johannesburg, and was commandeered (believe that is the term) into service.

I beg to express my sincere thanks for the prompt consideration which the Department of State has given this matter, and I hope sincerely that there is some way in which the desired end can be attained. Yours, very truly,

ANDREW J. MULCARE.

Mr. Choate to Mr. Hay.

[Telegram.]

AMERICAN EMBASSY,

London, November 21, 1900. Have received note from Lord Lansdowne stating no objection to American consul at Colombo communicating with the 22 prisoners of war referred to in your instruction No. 468, but all cominunications should be made either through governor of Ceylon or general officer commanding troops.

CHOATE.

Mr. Choate to Mr. Hay.

No. 431.]

AMERICAN EMBASSY,

London, November 21, 1900. Sir: Referring to my dispatch No. 418 of the 27th ultimo, I have the honor to inclose herewith a copy of a note which I have received from the Marquis of Lansdowne in relation to the American prisoners of war in Ceylon, together with a copy of a telegram" which I sent you on the 21st instant, from which it will be observed that the American consul at Colombo can communicate with the 22 prisoners of war, but that all communications should be made either through the governor of Ceylon or through the general officer commanding the troops. I have, etc.,

JOSEPH H. CHOATE.

a Printed, ante.

[Inclosure.]

Lord Lansdowne to Mr. Choate.

FOREIGN OFFICE, November 17, 1:400. Your EXCELLENCY: The Marquis of Salisbury referred your letter of the 25th ultimo to the secretary of state for war, and I have now the honor to inform your excellency that a telegram has been received from the military authorities in Ceylon to the effect that there is no objection to the United States consul at Colombo communicating with the 22 prisoners of war referred to in your excellency's note, but that all communications should be made either through the governor of Ceylon or through the general officer commanding the troops. I have, etc.,

LANSDOWNE.

Mr. Hay to Mr. Choate.

No. 500.]

DEPARTMENT OF STATE,

Washington, November 21, 1900. Sir: I inclose a copy of a letter from the Hon. Thomas Hedge, a member of Congress from Iowa, with inclosure, from which it

appears that Edward C. Janse, a native of Iowa, who was engaged in railroad building in South Africa, was captured by a British force at Machadodorp while engaged in his work, and was taken to Pretoria, where he is now held as a prisoner of war.

You will ask for an investigation of the matter and suggest that Mr. Janse be released, if the facts warrant it at this time. I am, etc.,

John Hay.

[Inclosure.]

Mr. Hedge to Mr. Hay.

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES,

Burlington, Iowa, November 16, 1900. DEAR Sir: Mr. Edward C. Janse, a native of Fort Madison, Lee County, Iowa, some three years ago went to South Africa to engage in railroad building. His family has received word that he was captured by the British at Machadodorp, where he was engaged in railroad work, and was taken to Pretoria as a prisoner of war, and is now held there as a prisoner. I inclose a letter from Mr. George B. Stewart, the assistant United States attorney at Fort Madison, which tells all that the family knows of the situation. I desire very much to relieve their anxiety concerning this young man and know of no more direct or certain course to take than by applying to the State Department to obtain particular information of the case and do what it properly may toward obtaining young Mr. Janse's release. May I ask your kind offices in this matter? Respectfully, yours,

THOMAS HEDGE,

[Subinclosure.]

Mr. Stewart to Mr. Hedge.

OFFICE OF UNITED STATES ATTORNEY,

SOUTHERN DISTRICT OF Iowa,

Fort Madison, Iowa, November 14, 1900. Dear Sir: Mr. Edward Janse, son of Mr. Hector Janse, one of the old Republicans of this county and town, has been in South Africa for three years past, engaged with his brother in contracts for building railroads. Word has just come that Mr. Janse was captured by the British at Machadodorp, where he was engaged on railroad work, and taken to Pretoria as a prisoner of war, where he now is. The family do not know the particulars or any more about it than I have given you. They are very much alarmed, and would greatly appreciate it if you would take the matter up with the State Department and have it ascertain the facts and do what it can for Mr. Janse. Mr. Edward Janse was born here; his family is a prominent and well-todo one, and he is an upright, sober young man, with a large circle of friends, who would greatly appreciate anything you could do for him. Yours, very truly,

GEORGE B. STEWART.

Mr. Choate to Mr. Hay.

No. 434.]

AMERICAN EMBASSY,

London, November 24, 1900. Sir: Referring to your instruction No. 482, dated the 1st instant, relating to the desire of the American friends of Mr. William Smith, a prisoner at St. Helena, to procure his release, I have the honor to report that by means of unofficial inquiries I have reliably ascertained that no application for the discharge of any particular prisoner at St. Helena would be entertained; that requests for the discharge of other prisoners similarly situated, made by other nations, directly and officially, have been refused, and that it would therefore not be expedient to present an application in his case. I have, etc.,

JOSEPH H. CHOATE.

Mr. Hay to Mr. Choate.

No. 506.)

DEPARTMENT OF STATE,

Washington, December 6, 1900. Sir: I inclose for your information copy of a letter from the Hon. William Alden Smith, a member of the House of Representatives, in regard to the case of William Frederic Versluis, formerly a member of Company M, First Illinois Infantry, who served in the American Army through the Santiago campaign, receiving an honorable discharg therefrom.

You will observe that he is now, it is supposed, held as a prisoner of war by the British, by whom he was captured between Heidelberg and Standerton, in September last, in South Africa.

You are requested to make inquiry in regard to the man in question with a view to taking such action in regard to the matter as may be deemed proper. I am, etc.,

John HAY.

(Inclosure.)

Mr. Smith to Mr. Hay.

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES,

Grand Rapids, Mich., November 30, 1900. DEAR SIR: Inclosed I send you letter from Hon. G. J. Diekema, chairman of the Republican State central committee of Michigan, including memorandum from Dr. J.). Huizinga, 100 State street, Chicago, III., relating to William Frederick Versluis, formerly a member of Company M, First Illinois Infantry, who served in the American Army through the Santiago campaign, receiving an honorable discharge. It is supposed that he is now held as prisoner by the British, by whom he was captured between Heidelberg and Standerton September last, in South Africa.

If you can save the life of this young soldier, his friends in this part of the State will esteem it a great favor, and I sincerely hope that you may be able to do so. With great respect, etc.,

WILLIAM ALDEN SMITH.

[Subinclosure.]
Mr. Diekema to Mr. Smith.

HOLLAND, Mich., November 28, 1909. MY DEAR FRIEND: I have just received from Dr. J. J. Huizinga, of Chicago, the inclosed note a relating to a William Frederick Versluis. The young doctor is very anxious to have me interest you in this matter. He says that Congressman Mann has been seen and will do what he can in the matter, and that whatever is done must be done quickly if the life of this young American captured by the British in South Africa is to be saved.

It is feared that he is in great danger of death by a process of drumhead courtmartial.

He fought under Colonel Roosevelt at Santiago and belonged to Colonel Turner's regiment. Do what you can in the matter, for you can do much in any matter. Very truly, yours,

G. J. DIEKEMA.

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Mr. llay to Mr. Choate. No. 525.]

DEPARTMENT OF STATE

Washington, January 3, 1901. Sir: I inclose, for such kindly consideration as you may be able to obtain for his request, a letter from Arie Dubber, stating that his brother, Dirk J. Dubber, is a prisoner of war on parole at Pretoria, and asking that he may be sent to some British or Dutch port whence, the writer states, he will guarantee payment for big brother's transportation to Cleveland, Ohio. I am, etc.,

JOHN HAY.

[Inclosure.)
Mr. Dubber to Mr. Hay.

CLEVELAND, Ohio, December 27, 1900. DEAR Sır: Information has reached me that my brother, Dirk J. Dubber, is now a prisoner of war on parole at Pretoria, South African Republic.

I would hereby kindly ask the good offices of our Government to request the English Government to transport the said D. J. Dubber to some English, or if in order, better still, to some Dutch port, whence I will guarantee payment for his transportation to Cleveland, Ohio. Very respectfully,

ARIE DUBBER.

Mr. Choate to Mr. Hay. No. 473.]

AMERICAN EMBASSY,

London, January 7, 1901. Sır: With reference to your instruction, No. 500, of the 21st of November last, inclosing a copy of a letter from Mr. Thomas Hedge, of Iowa, respecting the case of Mr. Edward J. Janse, I have the honor

a Not printed.

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