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to inclose a copy of a note from Lord Lansdowne, dated the 3d instant, from which it appears that Mr. Janse was released on parole on the 5th of October last and is reported to have returned to America. I have, etc.,

JOSEPH H. CHOATE.

(Inclosure.)
Lord Lansdoune to Mr. Choate,

FOREIGN OFFICE, January 3, 1901. Your EXCELLENCY: With reference to my note of the 8th ultimo respecting the case of Mr. E. J. Janse, I have the honor to inform you that I learn from Her Majesty's secretary of state for war that the gentleman in question was released on parole on the 5th October last, and is reported to have returned to America. I have, etc.,

LANSDOWNE.

Mr. Choate to Mr. Flay. No. 504.]

AMERICAN EMBASSY,

London, February 9, 1901. Sir: With reference to your instruction No. 525, of the 3d ultimo, relating to the case of Mr. Dirk J. Dubber, a prisoner of war on parole at Pretoria, I have the honor to inclose herewith the copy of a note which I have just received from Lord Lansdowne, in which it is stated that there is no reason to believe that Mr. Dubber is seriously or dangerously ill, which at present constitutes the only reason for extending exceptional treatment to prisoners of war, and that in these circumstances His Majesty's Government regret that they are unable to order the release of the person referred to. I have, etc.,

JOSEPH H. CHOATE.

[Inclosure.)
Lord Lansdoune to Mr. Choate.

FOREIGN OFFICE, February 6, 1901. Your EXCELLENCY: I referred to His Majesty's secretary of state for war your note of the 15th ultimo inclosing a copy of a letter from Mr. Arie Dubber, of Cleveland, Ohio, stating that his brother, Mr. Dirk J. Dubber, is a prisoner of war on parole at Pretoria, and asking that he may be sent to the United States of America from a British or Dutch port.

I have the honor to inform your excellency that there is no reason to believe that Mr. Dubber is seriously or dangerously ill, which at present constitutes the only reason for extending exceptional treatment to prisoners of war, and that in these circumstances His Majesty's Government regret that they are unable to order the release of the person referred to. I have, etc.,

LANSDOWNE.

Mr. Hil to Mr. Choate.

No. 620.]

DEPARTMENT OF STATE,

Washington, April 30, 1901. Sir: I inclose a copy of a letter from Frank Lawrence, from which it appears that Harry Wood, a native American citizen, is now a prisoner of war, held at Ragama Camp, in Ceylon, and is sick with enteric fever and not able well to bear the rigors and restrictions of the life of a prisoner.

You will inquire whether, in view of Mr. Wood's health, it may not be possible to release him on parole on condition that he return to the United States, his family furnishing the passage money. I am, etc.,

DAVID J. HILL,

Acting Secretary.

[Inclosure.]

Mr. Lawrence to Mr. Hay.

NEW YORK, April 26, 1901. DEAR Sır: Mr. John Elderkin, of this city, has very kindly consented to give me a letter of introduction to you, which I inclose with this letter, requesting your aid in my efforts to procure the release of my friend, Harry Wood, late of Washington, who is a son of the late John Thornton Wood of that city, who is now a British prisoner of war at the Ragama camp, in Ceylon. As my friend, Mr. Elderkin, explains, Mr. Wood was taken prisoner while sick in the hospital at Barberton, in the Transvaal, in September last. He was then suffering from enteric fever, and is in consequence in a very debilitated condition and totally unfitted to endure the rigors of even the best camp life. His family informed me that his treatment is very far from good, although, as his letters are censored, he is unable to enter into the details of his hardships. He does write, however, that the food supplied is quite unfitted for one in his condition, and that he was unable for seven weeks to obtain a stamp for the purpose of writing home.

He is an American citizen of native birth. It is not known definitely whether he was bearing arms against the British, nor whether they are prepared to maintain this. If his release upon parole can be obtained, his family will be very glad to deposit sufficient money with the British authorities to defray the expense of his return home. Mr. Wood is a gentleman, and his word can be relied upon.

I do not know just what may be done in the matter, but if your excellency can inform me as to the best course to pursue, and will make such representations to the proper British authorities as your excellency may deem most advisable, it will be a great favor both to me and to Mr. Wood and a great relief to his family, who are sorely troubled as to his condition. Respectfully, yours,

FRANK LAWRENCE,

[Subinclosure.]
Mr. Elderkin to Mr. Hay.

New York, April 26, 1901. DEAR Sır: I take the liberty of giving this letter to my friend, Mr. Frank Lawrence, of this city, who is desirous of obtaining the release of Harry Wood, an American citizen, late a resident of Washington, D. C., and son of John Thornton Wood, who at the time of his death was one of the editors of the North American Review. Probably Mr. John Thornton Wood was known to you, as he was a resident of Washington.

The son, Harry Wood, who is about 26 years of age, joined a body of Americans who went from New York to Delagoa Bay and from there crossed to the Transvaal and joined the Boers. He was made a prisoner by the British when sick of enteric fever in the hospital at Barberton in September last and was taken to Colombo, Ceylon, and is now in the Ragama camp, near that city. He is still sick and suffering for want of many necessities for one in his debilitated condition. His family are anxious to secure his parole and release, and are willing to furnish money to pay his passage to America. Mr. Frank Lawrence, who is a friend of Mr. Wood's family, has asked me to write and ask you for such assistance as the State Department can render in the case. If you will be so good as to interest yourself in the matter and inform Mr. Lawrence what steps are necessary in order to obtain Mr. Harry Wood's release, you will confer a personal favor upon me. Sincerely, yours,

John ELDERKIN.

Mr. Thill to Mr. Choate.

No. 636.]

DEPARTMENT OF STATE,

Washington, May 22, 1901. Sir: With reference to the Department's No. 482, of November 1 last, you are instructed to report what action you have taken in the matter of the request that Mr. William F. Smith, an American citizen, detained on St. Helena as a prisoner of war, be released on parole.

In consequence of a letter from the Hon. Frank E. Wilson, M. C., of the 16th instant, you are instructed to recall the matter to the attention of the British Government. 1 am, etc.,

David J. HILL,

Acting Secretary.

Mr. llill to Mr. Choate.

No. 641.)

DEPARTMENT OF STATE,

Washington, May 27, 1901. Sir: 1 inclose herewith copy of a letter from Hon. J. N. W. Rumple, a member of Congress from lowa, in regard to one Francis Connelly, a native of Davenport, Iowa, who is said to be held by the British Government as a prisoner of war on the island of Ceylon.

You may inquire whether it is possible for this young man to be released on parole on condition that he will return to the United States. I am, etc.,

David J. Hill,

Acting Secretary.

[Inclosure.)

Mr. Rumple to Mr. Hill.

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES,

Marengo, Iowa, May 22, 1901. Dear Sir: One Francis Connelly, a native of Davenport, Iowa, when 19 years old, went to Johannesburg, South Africa, to reside with his brother, in 1890; was there when the war broke out between England and the South African Republic; joined the Boer army, and was captured and is now a prisoner on the island of Ceylon. He has a brother who resides in Davenport, who, with many other friends, is very desirous that he should be released and allowed to return to the United States.

I do not suppose that the Department could make a demand for his release on account of his being an American citizen, but that the Department might use its good offices in asking that he be paroled on condition that he would return to the United States.

If you can give me the modus operandi necessary to bring about this result and assist me in any way in asking this favor of the English Government, I would consider it a great favor.

The parole of this young man will be greatly appreciated by the people of Davenport, and the Administration will receive their gratitude. Yours, truly,

J. N. W. RUMPLE.

Mr. Hay to Mr. Choate. No. 647.]

DEPARTMENT OF STATE,

Washington, June 4, 1901. Sir: I inclose herewith copy of a letter from Hon. James R. Mann, a member of Congress from Illinois, who desires inquiry to be made with a view to ascertain whether William Frederick Versluis, who is held as a British prisoner of war on the island of Ceylon, may not be released on parole on the understanding that he will return to the United States, his brothers furnishing the passage money. You may make the inquiry. I am, etc.,

JOHN Hay.

[Inclosure.)
Mr. Mann to Mr. Hill.

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES,

Chicago, N., May 31, 1901. Dear Sir: Referring to your kind favor of the 22d instant relating to the case of William Frederick Versluis, who is held as a prisoner of war by the British Government, permit me to request that you make proper representations to endeavor to obtain the release of Mr. Versluis on parole on the understanding that he will return to the United States. His brothers here are willing to furnish the passage money for his return home, and will do so at such time and in such manner as may be indicated by you or required.

May I specially request that an effort be made to obtain the release on parole of Versluis? I have, etc.,

JAMES R. MANX.

Mr. Choate to Mr. Ilay. No. 592.]

AMERICAN EMBASSY,

London, June 15, 1901. Sır: Referring to your instruction, No. 620, of the 30th of April last, in relation to the case of Mr. H. Wood, a native American citizen, at present a prisoner of war in Ceylon, I have the honor to inclose a copy of a note from Lord Lansdowne, dated the 13th instant, from which it appears that Mr. Wood is in good health.

Lord Lansdowne states that it would not be in accordance with the practice hitherto followed to release Mr. Wood, and that Mr. Brodrick regrets that the circumstances are such as to prevent him from complying with the request to that end. I have, etc.,

JOSEPH H. CHOATE.

[Inclosure.)
Lord Lansdowne to Mr. Choate,

FOREIGN OFFICE, June 13, 1901. Your EXCELLENCY: With reference to my note of the 21st ultimo, respecting the case of Mr. H. Wood, at present a prisoner of war in Ceylon, I have the honor to inform you that, as according to a telegram recently received from the governor of that colony, Mr. Wood is in good health, it would not be in accordance with the practice hitherto followed to release Mr. Wood.

Mr. Brodrick regrets that the circumstances should be such as to prevent him from complying with the request made in your note of the 14th ultimo. I have, etc.,

LANSDOWNE.

Mr. Choate to Mr. Hay.

No. 610.]

AMERICAN EMBASSY,

London, July 3, 1901. Sir: With reference to your instructions, Nos. 636 and 641, of May 22 and 27 last, I have the honor to inclose herewith a copy of a note which I have received from the Marquis of Lansdowne, stating that His Majesty's secretary of state for war is unable to make any exception in respect to prisoners of war, unless they are suffering from serious or dangerous illness, and that he does not see his way to ordering the release of Messrs. Connelly and Smith.

I had previously, upon the receipt of your instruction No. 636, approached His Majesty's Government in respect to Mr. W.F. Smith, but without success. I have, etc.,

JOSEPH H. CHOATE.

[Inclosure.)

Lord Lansdoune to Mr. Choate.

FOREIGN OFFICE, London, June 28, 1901. Your EXCELLENCY: I referred to His Majesty's secretary of state for war the copies of dispatches addressed to your excellency by the United States Government, asking for the release of two United States citizens, Messrs. F. Connelly and W. Smith, who are detained as prisoners of war in Ceylon and St. Helena, respectively.

I have the honor to inform your excellency that I learn from Mr. Secretary Brodrick that he is unable to make exceptions in the cases of individual prisoners of war unless they are suffering from serious or dangerous illness, and consequently regrets that he does not see his way to ordering the release of Messrs. Connelly and W. Smith. I have, etc.,

LANSDOWNE.

Mr. Choate to Mr. Hay.

No. 621.]

AMERICAN EMBASSY,

London, July 11, 1901. Sir: With reference to your instruction No. 647, of the 4th ultimo, and to my dispatch No. 610, of the 5th instant, I assume that you will have inferred from Lord Lansdowne's note of the 28th ultimo, stating that His Majesty's Government is unable to make any exception in respect to prisoners of war unless they are suffering from serious or dangerous illness, and that the secretary of state for war does not see his way to ordering the release of Messrs. Connelly and Smith, that it would be neither advisable nor of any use to ask for the release on parole of Mr. William Frederick Versluis. I have, etc.,

JOSEPH H. CHOATE.

Mr. Adee to Mr. Choate.

No. 735.]

DEPARTMENT OF STATE,

Washington, September 30, 1901. Sir: On November 1, 1900, you were instructed to present informally a petition for the release of William Smith, an American citizen held as a prisoner of war at St. Helena, and you replied in your No.

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