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APPENDIX B

Acreage granted to States and Territories, as of June 30, 1953 1

State

For other
institu-
tions

For rail-
roads

For swamp
reclama-

tion

For other
purposes

Total

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Alabama.

911, 627
Alaska.

421,009, 209
Arizona.

8,093, 156
Arkansas.

933, 778
California.

5, 534, 293
Colorado

3,685, 618
Connecticut
Delaware.
Florida.

975, 307
Georgia
Idaho.

2,963, 698
Nlinois.

996, 320
Indiana.

668,578
Iowa

1,000, 679
Kansas

2,907, 520
Kentucky
Louisiana.

807, 271
Maine..
Maryland
Massachusetts.
Michigan..

1,021, 867
Minnesota

2,874, 951
Mississippi.

824, 213
Missouri

1, 221, 813
Montana

5, 198, 258
Nebraska.

2, 730, 951
Nevada

2,061, 967
New Hampshire.
New Jersey
New Mexico

8, 711, 324
New York.
North Carolina.
North Dakota..

2,495, 396
Ohio

724, 266 Oklahoma.

1, 375, 000 Oregon

3, 399, 360 Pennsylvania Rhode Island..

See footnotes at end of table, p. 362.

383, 785
4 438, 250
849, 197
196, 080
196, 080
138, 040
180,000

90,000
182, 160
270,000
386, 686
526, 080
436, 080
286, 080
151, 269
330, 000
256, 292
210,000
210,000
360,000
286, 080
212, 160
348, 240
376, 080
388, 721
136, 080
136, 080
150,000

210,000
1, 346, 546

990, 000
270.000
336,080

699, 120
1,050,000

136, 165
780,000
120,000

5,006, 506
421, 447, 459

10, 543, 753
11, 936, 834
8,823, 819
4, 471, 604
180,000

90,000
24, 206, 305

270,000
4, 254, 448
6, 234, 655
4,040, 478
8,061, 262
7,794, 668

354, 606
11, 430, 076

210,000
210,000

360,000
12, 143, 844
19 16, 421, 963

6,096, 911

7, 416, 982 19 5, 963, 338

3,458, 711 2,725, 226

150,000

210,000
12,794, 659

990,000

270,000
10 3, 163, 552

2,758, 862

3,095, 760
29 7,032, 847

780,000
120,000

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Acreage granted to States and Territories, as of June 30, 1953 1—Continued

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2,376, 391

10 200,000

(19)

32 132,000

982, 329 3, 470, 009

3, 652, 322

302, 931

2 1,022, 349

500,000

3,360, 786

10 420,000

33 26, 400
34 316, 431

Total.

4 98, 532, 429

35 17,033, 972

36 3,933, 274

37, 128, 531

20 3, 359, 188

37 6, 103, 749

7, 806, 555

64,895, 218

10 6,429, 59038 245, 282, 506

1 For additional information concerning these grants, see the Report of the Director,
1947, Statistical Appendix, pp. 118-135; 1948, p. 59; 1949, p. 59; 1950, p. 58; 1951, p. 61;
1952, p. 61.

2 See footnote 37.
3 Salt springs, 23,040; seat of government, 1,620.
4 Except for 102,500 acres granted to the Territory for university purposes, the lands in
Alaska are reserved pending statehood.
5 Park and other purposes, 1,400; payment of bonds, 1,000,000; public buildings, 100,000.
6 Public buildings, 10,600; salt springs, 46,080.
7 Public buildings, 6,400; parks, 394,368.

8 Biological station, 160; public buildings, 32,000; salt springs, 46,080; Carey Acts,
37,706.
Seat of government.
10 See footnote 36.
11 Fish and game, 232; hot springs, 187; park, 6,751; public buildings, 32,000; Carey Acts,
614,894.
12 Salt springs, 121,029; seat of government, 2,560.
13 S .lt springs, 23,040; seat of government, 2,560.
14 Park, 544;

public buildings, 3,200; salt springs, 46,080.
15 Bridge, 3,922; game preserve, 3,021; public buildings, 6,400; salt springs, 46,080.
16 Public buildings, 3,200; salt springs, 46,080.

17 Includes not more than 65,000 acres of lands in Montana, North Dakota, and Wash-
ington which were selected by a grantee of the State of Minnesota.

18 Forestry, 20,000: military purposes, 8; park, 8,392; public buildings, 6,400: salt springs, 46,080.

io See footnote 17. 20 Salt springs, 46,080; seat of government, 2,560. 11 Militia camp, 640; park, 1,439; public buildings, 182,000; Carey Acts, 92,280.

22 Agricultural experiments, 800; public buildings, 12,800; salt springs, 46,080.
23 Public buildings, 12,800; Carey Acts, 1,579.

24 Payment of bonds, 1,000,000; public buildings, 132,000; reimbursement of local gov.
ernments, 250,000; reservoirs, 500,000; not specified, 46; Carey Acts, 4,743.

25 Historical Society, 76; public buildings, 82,000.
26 Salt springs.

27 Includes about 93,000 acres, title to which was reconveyed to the United States
pursuant to the act of Feb. 26, 1919 (40 Stat. 1197).

28 Parks, 1,402; public buildings, 6,400; salt springs, 46,080; Carey Acts, 73,442.
29 See footnote 27.
30 Military camp, 640; missionary work, 160; parks, 2,769; public buildings, 82,000.
31 Public buildings, 64,000; reservoirs, 500,000; Carey Acts, 37,240.
32 Public buildings.
33 Forestry, 20,000; public buildings, 6,400.
34 fish hatchery, 5,480; public buildings, 107,000; salt springs, 640; Carey Acts, 203,311.
35 See footnotes 4 and 36.

36 Includes acreage of grants for "educational and charitable" purposes, as follows:
Idaho, 150,000; North Dakota, 170,000; South Dakota, 170,000; and Washington, 200,000.
Includes 669,000 acres granted to Oklahoma for "charitable, penal, and public building"
purposes, and 290,000 acres granted to Wyoming for "charitable, penal, educational,"
and other institutions.

37 Grants for river improvement projects, 1,505,080 acres, as follows: Alabama, 400,016;
Iowa, 321,342; New Mexico, 100,000; and Wisconsin, 683,722. Grants for canals, 4,598,669
acres.

39 See footnotes 4 and 27.

Source: U. S. Bureau of Land Management, Report of the Director, 1953, Statistical
Appendix, Washington, D, C., table 115, pp. 132–133.

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Source: U. 8. Department of Agriculture Circular No. 909, Federal and State Rural Lands, 1950, p. 76, and Annual Report of the Director, Bureau of Land Management, 1949, Statistical Appendix, p. 5.

APPENDIX D

STATEMENT OF LICENSES AND TAXES COLLECTED BY THE DEPARTMENT OF TAXATION

OF THE TERRITORY OF ALASKA

(For the period January 1, 1953, to December 31, 1953) Title 48, chapter 2, section 17, ACLA, 1949, states that the Tax Commissioner shall prepare and annually publish statistics with respect to the revenues derived under the tax laws administered by him. In keeping with this statute the following is submitted for publication :

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Amusement and gaming devices..
Automobile license registrations..
Business licenses...
Business licenses, old nonalcoholic

beverages.
Certificate of title-
Drivers' licenses.
Fisheries:

Cold storage and fish process

ing (ch. 97).
Fish-trap licenses.
Fishermen's licenses, resident.
Fishermen's licenses, nonresi-

dent.
Gill nets.
Raw fish tax (ch. 82)
Seines.

Sport fishing licenses.
Gross sales and services.
Inheritance tax, principal.
Inheritance tax, interest.
Liquor-excise taxes.
Mines and mining -
Motor fuel oil (construction of

roads). Net income tax, Fees for photostat copies, income

tax returns..
Profit taxes on property sales.
Property tax.
Punchboard tax.
School tax..
Tobacco tax.

Total.

69, 450. 48 424, 300.00 37, 010.00 60.270.00

9, 377.00 2,028, 100.64

14, 375.00 25, 099.00

5, 065.00 33, 047.44

1, 180.42 1,595, 080.01

140,092. 23 1, 274, 191.32 6, 414, 115. 29

62, 443.21 50.00 6,975. 27 2.7 295, 200.00

129, 100.00 26,070.00 65.00 10, 875.00 38, 175.00

22,095.00 1 5, 131.00

4, 246.00 13.0

780, 902.34 7,881.29 1, 239, 317.01 1 12, 205.00

2, 170.00 .2

3,555.00 246.00 13, 576.00 7,722.00 156.89

4,908.11 .2 9,550.27 184.74 14,450.80 8, 861. 63 93. 69

176. 21 910. 52 10.2 336, 167.60 20, 430.33 899, 998. 78 338, 483.30 9

1, 204.58 13, 575.93 125, 311. 72 8.2 258, 158.84 34, 839.55 710, 936.97 270, 255, 96 41.0 1, 815, 783.28 85, 082.953, 190, 984.01 1,322, 265.05 2.00

48. 69 445. 74 3

16, 153. 56 6, 650. 47 22, 659.96 5, 618,53 1, 622.00 148.00

438.00 1.9 83, 112.50 6,852. 50 158, 812.50 53, 215.00 5.3 227, 635.84 30, 795. 30 395, 205. 17 171, 425. 29

2.00 494. 43 51, 082.52

2, 208.00 301, 992.50 825, 061.60

15, 630, 071.98

100.0 4,374, 298. 40231, 316.538, 105, 171.592, 919, 285. 46

TERRITORY OF ALASKA, FIRST JUDICIAL DIVISION.

I, K. F. Dewey, tax commissioner, Department of Taxation of the Territory of Alaska, do hereby affirm that the above statement is correct and true to the best of my knowledge and belief.

K. F. DEWEY, Tax Commissioner.

APPENDIX E

UNITED STATES SENATE,
COMMITTEE ON INTERIOR AND INSULAR AFFAIRS,

February 22, 1954.

MEMORANDUM

To: Senator Guy Cordon, cc: Senators Anderson and Jackson. From: Stewart French. Subject: Russian treatment of Alaskan natives. · Apropos to our discussion of native rights in Alaska in connection with our statehood bill, here is a brief look at the status of Alaskan natives under the Russians. The Library of Congress study, Russian Administration of Alaska and the Status of Alaskan Natives, published as a Senate Document (s. Doc. No. 152, 81st Cong.), shows that the aboriginal inhabitants had few if any recognized, protected rights, property or otherwise, at the time we acquired sovereignty under the 1867 treaty.

The natives were obliged by Russian law to work for the Russian-American company, the Czarist sponsored monopoly for exploration of Alaska. Each tribe had to furnish one-half of its males between 18 and 50 for 3 years compulsory service, for which the law required that they be paid at "not less than one-fifth of the rate received by Russians.” (Library of Congress study, p. 44). They were not permitted to "visit the neighboring shores without permission of the colonial authorities” (p. 45). If they wished to sell furs, on their own account, they were permitted to do so only to the company and at prices fixed by the company.

That is, under Russian rule, Alaskan natives had a status in many respects similar to that of the serfs of Russia.

In the instructions from the Czar's Ministers to the Russian Ambassador in Washington, Baron de Stoecke, regarding the treaty by which the Territory was sold (it was beginning to cost the Russians money), natives who had not embraced the Russian orthodox faith were not even regarded as "inhabitants," entitled to protection.

The 1867 treaty in article III provided that the "inhabitants" could return to Russia if they wished within 3 years; otherwise "they, with the exception of uncivilized native tribes, shall be admitted to the enjoyment of all of the rights, advantages, and immunities of citizens of the United States. [Emphasis supplied.] *** The uncivilized tribes will be subject to such laws and regulations as the United States may, from time to time, adopt in regard to aboriginal tribes of that country.”

In U. 8. v. Lynch (7 Alaska Reports 572), Federal Judge Wickersham, (later Delegate to Congress and sponsor, in 1916, of the first Alaska statehood bill), held that the tribes described “became subject to such rules and regulations as the United States may thereafter adopt as to the native Indians of the United States."

STEWART FRENCH,

Committee Counsel.

Х

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