The Writings of Thomas Jefferson: Correspondence

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H. W. Derby, 1859
 

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Page 324 - I have sworn upon the altar of God, eternal hostility against every form of tyranny over the mind of man.
Page 406 - The day that France takes possession of New Orleans fixes the sentence which is to restrain her forever within her low water mark. It seals the union of two nations who, in conjunction, can maintain exclusive possession of the ocean. From that moment we must marry ourselves to the British fleet and nation.
Page 140 - ... the field and Solomons in the council, but who have had their heads shorn by the harlot England. In short, we are likely to preserve the liberty we have obtained only by unremitting labors and perils. But we shall preserve it; and our mass of weight and wealth on the good side is so great, as to leave no danger that force will ever be attempted against us. We have only to awake and snap the Lilliputian cords with which they have been entangling us during the first sleep which succeeded our labors.
Page 477 - Louisiana, as ceded by France to the United States, is made a part of the United States ; its white inhabitants shall be citizens, and stand, as to their rights and obligations, on the same footing with other citizens of the United States, in analogous situations.
Page 427 - If we can prevent the government from wasting the labors of the people under the pretense of caring for them, they will be happy.
Page 140 - Congress have risen," writes he. "You will have seen by their proceedings the truth of what I always observed to you, that one man outweighs them all in the influence over the people, who have supported his judgment against their own and that of their representatives. Republicanism must lie on its oars, resign the vessel to its pilot, and themselves to what course he thinks best for them.
Page 244 - But if on a temporary superiority of the one party, the other is to resort to a scission of the Union, no federal government can ever exist.
Page 474 - The Constitution has made no provision for our holding foreign territory, still less for incorporating foreign nations into our Union.
Page 245 - Pennsylvania and a Virginia party arise in the residuary confederacy, and the public mind will be distracted with the same party spirit. What a game, too, will the one party have in their hands by eternally threatening the other that unless they do so and so they will join their Northern neighbors ? If we reduce our Union to Virginia and North Carolina, immediately the conflict will be established between the representatives of these two states, and they will end by breaking into their simple units.
Page 405 - On this subject the Secretary of State has written to you fully, yet I cannot forbear recurring to it personally, so deep is the impression it makes on my mind.

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