PLAIN AND PLEASANT TALK ABOUT Fruits, Flowers and Farming

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Page 391 - To make the river flow. The clouds might give abundant rain, The nightly dews might fall, And the herb that keepeth life in man, Might yet have drunk them all. Then wherefore, wherefore were they made, All dyed with...
Page 391 - God might have made the earth bring forth Enough for great and small, The oak tree and the cedar tree, Without a flower at all. We might have had enough, enough, For every want of ours, For luxury, medicine, and toil, And yet have had no flowers.
Page 391 - To comfort man, to whisper hope Whene'er his faith is dim ; For whoso careth for the flowers Will much more care for him.
Page 391 - Our outward life requires them not, Then wherefore had they birth? To minister delight to man, To beautify the earth; To whisper hope — to comfort man Whene'er his faith is dim; For whoso careth for the flowers Will care much more for Him!
Page 391 - Then wherefore, wherefore were they made, All dyed with rainbow light, All fashioned with supremest grace Upspringing day and night, — Springing in valleys green and low, And on the mountains high, And in the silent wilderness Where no man...
Page 415 - ... to die, until the apple crop of the United States shall surpass the potato crop in value, both for man and beast. It has the double quality of palatableness, raw or cooked — it is a, permanent...
Page 4 - London's works—his encyclopedias of Horticulture, of Agriculture, and of Architecture. We fell upon them, and, for years, almost monopolized them. In our little one-story cottage, after the day's work was done, we pored over these monuments of an almost incredible industry, and read, we suppose, not only every line, but much of it, many times over ; until, at length, we had a topographical knowledge of many of the fine English estates —quite as intimate, we dare say, as was possessed by many...
Page 301 - ... is the effect of the former important. Thus, when Pears are grafted or budded on the wild species, Apples upon Crabs, Plums upon Plums, and Peaches upon Peaches or Almonds, the scion is, in regard to fertility, exactly in the same state as if it had not been grafted at all. While, on the other hand, a great increase of fertility is the result of grafting Pears upon Quinces, Peaches upon Plums, Apples upon Whitethorn, and the like. In these latter cases, the food absorbed from the earth by the...
Page 411 - I am induced to send you some remarks upon the condition of things in this State in horticultural matters from observing your disposition to make your magazine not merely a record of specific processes and a register of plants and fruits, but also a chronicle of the yearly progress and condition of the horticultural art. I should be glad if I could in any degree thus repay the pleasure which others have given me through your numbers by reciprocal efforts. Horticultural Society's Fair.
Page 378 - ... conclusion, I must say that I feel a great deal of diffidence in offering you these remarks. My experience is not sufficient to warrant a faithful observance of the mode of culture here adopted. Several planters of more experience, intelligence, and observation than myself, prefer planting, for instance, two and a half feet one way and three feet the other, and give as a reason, that it is more convenient, while the plant is less liable to injury during the time the hands are employed in mowing...

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