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the civilized nations of the earth to make an exhibition of their natural resources, of the products of human ingenuity, and of the triumphs and trophies of modern civilization. When that exhibition was over, all England stood aghast. In all those departments of labor into which artistic design and decorative skill entered, France had carried off the honors.

A commission of inquiry was immediately formed, the result of which was that in less than twenty-five years England had two hundred well equipped technical schools, one of which cost $6,000,000, and four thousand other schoools in which technical instruction formed a part of the curriculum. As a result, England made such an advance in her commercial industries as had never before been known.

In order to show what has been done by foreign countries in behalf of agricultural and technical education, I call attention to the following table:

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A careful inspection of the above table will, I think, dispose of any suggestion that the State of Indiana has been extravagant in its expenditure for technical education. If comparisons are of any value, it might be said that, while Indiana has spent, in twenty-four years, $285,000 towards the permanent equipment of its technical school, England has spent $6,000,000 in establishing one of its many technical schools, and Germany has recently expended $3,000,000 in the erection and equipment of a chemical laboratory for one of its technical schools, and that this laboratory forms but one department of that institution. When we remember that Germany has established in all seventy high-grade technical schools, we may have some conception of the great effort she is making for industrial supremacy.

NEEDS OF THE INSTITUTION.

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1. In my twenty-second report I set forth the needs of the Agricultural Department of the l'niversity, but failed to secure provision for these needs, and they still exist.

Although a comparison between the amount of money spent at Purdluo for certain purposes and the amount spent by other instituitions for similar purposes does not form the best sort of argument, it

be interesting to know that while Wisconsin has a dairy that cost $30,000, Purdue's dairy cost $2,000; while Wisconsin has two general buildings for agricultural science costing $70,000, Purdue has one, costing $15,000; that while the entire equipment of Wisconsin's School of Agriculture, exclusive of land, cost. $185,000, Purlue's equipment cost about $40,000.

2. I have often spoken of the need of an Assembly Hall. At present our chapel will not seat half of our students, to say nothing of the thousand or more people who come to Purdue to attend our Commencement exercises and other public functions. Those of you who looked upon that thoroughly drenched audience of 1,500 people who attended our last Commencement, hell in a tent, and who witnessed the discomfort and possibly the physical injury to which the people were subjected, the ruin to clothing, the interruption to the speakers and the final postponing of the closing exercises, neel not be told that we need a new Assembly IIall.

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the civilized nations of the earth to make a natural resources, of the products of human triumphs and trophies of modern civilization tion was over, all England stood aghast. In of labor into which artistic design and de France had carried off the honors.

A commission of inquiry was immediately which was that in less than twenty-five years dred well equipped technical schools, one of and four thousand other schoools in which formed a part of the curriculum. As a resu an advance in her commercial industries as known.

In order to show what has been done 1 behalf of agricultural and technical educat the following table:

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A careful inspection of the above table any suggestion that the State of Indiana its expenditure for technical education. I value, it might be said that, while Indiana years, $285,000 towards the permanent school, England has spent $6,000,000 i many technical schools, and Germany $3,000,000 in the erection and equipmen' for one of its technical schools, and that one department of that institution. Why many has established in all serenty highmay have some conception of the great industrial supremacy.

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CONCLUSION.

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I have shown that the faith of the State is pledged to the maintenance of Purdue University. The institution must be kept open or large sums of money must be returned to the General Government. Large properties must also be returned to John Purdne's heirs and others, and the State must dishonor its own contract.

This, of course, the State will never do. The only question that remains to be discussed is this: To what degree of efficiency shall Purdue University aspire? It should be remembered that, whatever else it may be, Purdue University is first, and most of all, a School of Applied Science.

Modern science is very exacting; it tolerates nothing but accuracy; nothing short of this is scientific, anything less is an absolute failure. The demand, therefore, upon a school of technology is for the latest and best. No one who thinks of the immense strides that have recently been made—in the subject of electricity for example—would think of teaching it as it was taught twenty years ago. The subject requires new methods and new appliances. This is just as true of chemistry, of biology, of sanitary science, of bridge building, of railway-making, and indeed of the entire range of technical sciences.

A technical school is compelled, therefore, to keep up with the progressive changes which are being made with such lightning-like rapidity in those departments of economie science which are within the scope of its work, and any technical school which stands to-day where it did yesterday is unscientific and unworthy of confidence. All this is quite obvious to those who read and reflect.

Furthermore, information is so freely distributed nowadays that even young men seeking an education are quite apt to know the difference between the best and that which is inferior, and they are quite as likely to know where the best can be obtained. In my fifteen years' work at Purdue I have had abundant evidence to prove that students would not submit to inferiority, and I have

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