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To the Board of Trustees, Purdue University :

I herewith submit the annual report of Purdue University for the year ending June 30, 1899, as required by the act of Congress of July 2, 1862, under which the institution is organized.

I preface this annual report with a verbatim copy of the annual report to the Honorable Secretary of Agriculture and the Honorable Secretary of the Interior, as required by the act of Congress of August 30, 1890.

It will be observed that this report embraces several somewhat unusual subjects, as follows:

First-The organization and work of our Young Men's Christian Association as reported by its efficient leader and general secretary, Mr. George W. Leavitt. This association, although under the control of the students and not directly under that of the University, is so closely identified with its welfare and is such a valuable auxiliary to the University work that I thought it would be of interest to the Board to be possessed of some information regarding it.

Second-A report from Mr. Frank H. Curtiss, our physical director, concerning the organization and work of the gymnasium. This will be found to possess more than usual interest.

Third--A report by the chairman of our athletic committee, Prof. W. E. Stone, on the relation of athletics to the University. This report shows that whatever may be said of the value of athletics in college life in general, we have taken unusual pains to eliminate all possible evils and to secure the utmost possible good from our college athletics.

Respectfully submitted,

JAMES H. SMART,

President of the Unirosityy. January 20, 1900.

REPORT TO THE SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE AND

THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR.

Name of institution, Purdue University; Post-office, LaFayette; State, Indiana.

Report of the President of said institution to the Secretary of the Interior and the Secretary of Agriculture, as required by act of Congress of August 30, 1890, in aid of Colleges of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts.

I. CONDITION AND PROGRESS OF THE INSTITUTION FOR THE

YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1899.

(a) We have made a one-story brick addition to our Chemical Laboratory, 20 by 30 feet.

(b) We have erected a substantial wooden pavilion, 30 by 50 feet, for lecture room purposes, particularly for the use of students in Agriculture.

(c) Also, a two-story piggery built in accordance with approved modern plans.

(d) An extensive addition to our dairy is in process of erection.

(e) We have remodeled an.1 made a substantial addition to the engineer's residence.

(f) Also, have remodeled the central heating plant, putting in new boilers, erecting two new coal houses, etc.

(g) We have improved our campus by laying cement walks to the extent of over 25,000 feet.

(h) In addition to these improvements, we have added to our equipment to the extent of about $10,000, making the total cost of improvements for the year 1898-9 about $20,000.

General Remarks: While the total enrollment for the year 1898-9 was 749, one less than that of the previous year, the number of graduates, 158, (graduates from regular four-year courses, 103; Pharmacy graduates, 33; advanced degrees, 22) was the largest in the history of the University. The Freshman class numbered 180—the largest save one. The number of students taking the Short Course in Agriculture was fifty per cent. in advance of any previous year.

During the year 1898-9 we have published eight regular Station bulletins, sixteen newspaper bulletins, a pamphlet on civil engineering, and an address by Governor Mount on “The Need for Higher Education in Agriculture and the Industrial Arts."

Our professors have delivered about one hundred lectures on scientific subjects, and 92 Farmers' Institutes have been held, averaging two days each.

II. RECEIPTS FOR AND DURING THE YEAR ENDED JUNE

30, 1899.

$5,985 69

64,525 21

1. Balance on hand July 1, 1898..
2. State Aid-

(a) Income from endowment granted by State...
(b) Appropriation for current expenses...
(C) Appropriations for building or for other special

purposes 3. Federal Aid

(a) Income from land grant, act of July 2, 1862. .....
(b) Additional endowment act of August 30, 1890..

(C) For experiment stations, act of March 2, 1887.. 4. Fees and all other sources..

3,633 13

17,000 00 24,000 00 15,000 00 30,888 88

Total

.$161,032 91

III. EXPENDITURES FOR AND DURING THE YEAR ENDED

JUNE 30, 1899.

1. Instruction in the subjects specified in section 1, act of August 30, 1890......

$53,075 00 2. Instruction in all other subjects, if any, not mentioned in Question 1 of this series....

11,075 00 3. Administrative expenses (President's, Secretary's, Treas

urer's, Librarian's salary, clerical service, fuel, light, etc.),
including all supplies, repairs, apparatus and improve
ments

67,280 86 4. Experiment Station..

17,146 75 *Balance

12,455 30

Total

.$161,032 91

* Liabilities, all funds, $9,253.83.

IV. PROPERTY, YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1899.

Value of all buildings, $353,000; of other equipment, $289,000.

Value of above property, not used for instruction in the subjects specified in section 1 of act of August 30, 1890, buildings $40,000; of other equipment, $10,000.

Total number of acres, 190; acres under cultivation, 149; acres used for experiments, 90; value of farm lands, $60,000; amount of all endowment funds, $340,000.

Number of bound volumes, June 30, 1899, 8,950; pamphlets, 3,000.

V. FACULTY DURING THE YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1899.

Male. Female.

1. College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts

(a) Preparatory classes.....
(b) Collegiate and special classes.

58

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(c) Total, counting none twice..... 2. Number in all other departments (avoiding duplication). 3. Number of staff of Experiment Station...

11

VI. STUDENTS DURING THE YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1899.

Male. Female.

1. College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts

(a) Preparatory classes....
(b) Collegiate and special classes.
(c) Post Graduate courses..

618
40

69 22

Total, counting none twice.

658 91 2. Number in all other departments. ... 3. Number of students that pursued courses in agriculture, 92; mechani

cal engineering, 185; civil engineering, 95; electrical engineering, 126; mining engineering, ......; architecture, 95; household economy,

...; veterinary science, 92; military tactics, no instructor. (It is not expected that the sum of these figures will equal the number

of students given above.) 4. What degrees and how many of each kind were conferred in 1898-99

16

DEGREES CONFERRED-1898-99.
On Men-

B. S. in Science...
B. S. in Agriculture.
B. S. in Civil Engineering.
B. S. in Electrical Engineering.
B. S. in Mechanical Engineering.
B. S. in Pharmacy..

21

17 38 2

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5. What and how many honorary degrees were conferred in 1898-99? None.

JAMES H. SMART,

President of the University.

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