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IV. PROPERTY, YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1900,

Value of all buildings, $357,000; of other equipment, $298,000.

Value of above property not used for instruction in the subjects specified in section 1 of act of August 30, 1890: Buildings, $40,000; of other equipment, $10,000.

Total number of acres, 190; acres under cultivation, 149; acres used for experiments, 90; value of farm lands, $60,000; amount of all endowment funds, $340,000.

Number of bound volumes, June 30, 1900, 10,051; pamphlets, 3,272.

V. FACULTY DURING THE YEAR ENDED JUNE 30. 1900,

Female.

1. College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts

Male.
(a) Preparatory classes.....
(b) Collegiate and special classes.

62
(c) Total, counting none twice...

62 2. Number in all other departments.

2 3. Number of staff of Experiment Station.

11 Special lectures in Agriculture and Engineering, etc. 11

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VI. STUDENTS DURING THE YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1900.

1. College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts

Male.

Female.

(a) Preparatory classes.
(b) Collegiate and special classes..
(c) Post Graduate courses.

724
39

| :

73 13

Total, counting none twice....

763

86 2 Number in all other departments (excluding dupli

cates ... 3. Number of students that pursued courses in agriculture, 128; mechani

cal engineering, 202; civil engineering, 106; electrical engineering, 193; mining engineering, ......; architecture, ......; household economy, 20; veterinary science, 81; dairying, 39; military tactics, no

instructor. 4. What degrees and how many of each kind were conferred in 1899-1900

DEGREES CONFERRED IN 1899-1900.

On Men-
Bachelor of Science

11 Bachelor of Science in Agriculture..

4 Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy.

2 Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering..

6 Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering..

15 Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering.

26 Electrical Engineer...

4 Mechanical Engineer.

4 Analytical Chemist..

1 Graduate in Pharmacy.

21 On WomenBachelor of Science...

5 Master of Science.

1 5. What and how many honorary degrees were conferred in 1899-1900 ? None.

WINTHROP E. STONE,

President of the Unirersity.

ATTENDANCE FOR THE YEAR 1899-1900.

The whole number of students in attendance during the year ending June 30, 1900, was 849, classified as follows:

SUMMARY OF STUDENTS.

Graduate students
Seniors
Juniors
Sophomores
Freshmen
School of Pharmacy.
Special Class in Agriculture.
Special

52 71 127 160 241 75 92 31

Total

819

The following table will show the growth of the institution in respect to attendance since its organization, the respective figures being for the year ending June 30, of the years named:

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('OUNTIES REPRESENTED.

Names of counties represented by one or more students:

Adams, Allen, Bartholomew, Benton, Blackford, Boone, Carroll, Cass, Clark, Clay, Clinton, Daviess, Dearborn, Decatur, Dekalb, Delaware, Elkhart, Fayette, Floyd, Fountain, Franklin,

Fulton, Gibson, Grant, Greene, Hamilton, Hancock, Hendricks, Henry, Howard, Huntington, Jackson, Jasper, Jay, Jefferson, Jennings, Johnson, Knox, Kosciusko, Lagrange, Lake, Laporte,

Madison, Marion, Martin, Marshall, Miami, Monroe, Montgomery, Morgan, Newton, Noble, Orange, Owen, Parke, Perry, Porter, Posey, Putnam, Randolph, Ripley, Rush, St. Joseph,

Scott, Shelby, Spencer, Steuben, Sullivan, Switzerland, Tippecanoe, Tipton, Union, Vanderburgh, Vermillion, Vigo, Wabash, Warren, Warrik, Washington, Wayne, Wells, White.

Total, 82.

STATES AND FOREIGN COUNTRIES REPRESENTED.

The States and countries represented in the institution during the present year are as follows:

Kentucky, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska,

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Arkansas, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Idahu, Illinois, Iodiana, Iowa,

2- PURDUE REPORT.

THE YEAR'S WORK.

The work of Purdue University as fixed by law is of three kinds, viz.: To instruct students; to conduct scientific and technical research, and to disseminate information. The annual report of its officers, therefore, properly includes reference to each of these lines of activity.

INSTRICTION OF STUDENTS.

As shown on a preceding page, there was a considerable increase in the number of students enrolled for the year; the same being distributed through all departments although it was proportionally largest in the short winter course in Agriculture.

In all of the six schools of the University the prescribed courses of study have been maintained with thoroughness and efficiency, 103 graduates receiving degrees at the close of the year's work.

Certain changes in the course in Civil Engineering have been adopted to go into operation during the coming academic year (1900-1901). These changes have had for their purpose the securing to the student of a greater amount of time for field practice in surveying as well as for training in the important subjects of the Location, Construction and Maintenance of Railways and Railway Structures. In furtherance of this plan, the optional course in Architectural Engineering has been discontinued.

In pursuance of the policy of the institution, numerous additions have been made to the equipment for instruction in each department. It can not be expected that competent instruction in technology or science can be given with equipment which is allowed to become obsolete or which is incomplete. Our students are to use the training which we provide in the most active and progressive fields in the world, and unless we furnish the best and most modern facilities they will seek elsewhere for that which the technical professions demand of them. It is necessary, therefore, that our lab

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