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sentatives, 79-81; vote of House
of Representatives for, 81; South
Carolina's confidence in, 266; defeat
of, 489; friends charge corruption,
489-492; letter to Swartwout, 492,
493; speeches, 495, 496; renominated
by Tennessee, 496-498; charges
Clay with corruption, 504-508; reso-
lutions of Tennessee, 508–510; reso-
lutions of New York, 510, 511; ac-
tion of Kentucky, 511, 512; cam-
paign of 1828, 514-520; campaign
literature, 514-516; attitude on the
tariff, 516, 517; his victory and vote,
517-520, note; his Cabinet, 520, 521;
the damand for office, 521-523;
note; the inauguration, 523-525;
scramble for office, 525, note; ear-
lier view on use of patronage, 525,
526; members of Congress appoint-
ed to office by, 526, note; inaugura-
tion of the spoils system, 526, 527;
wholesale removals, 528; the scram-
ble for office, 528–530; appointment
of editors, 530, 531; distress caused
by removals, 531; removal of post-
masters and its effect, 532, 533;
complaints of the administration or
the post-office, 533–536; Indian pol-
icy, 537-540; rumored tariff policy,
555, 556.
Jamaica. Island of, 488.
Jefferson, Thomas. On our Euro-

pean relations, 30; on European In-
tervention, 45-46; on Marshall's

Washington, 294, note; cited by
Calhoun,266; evolution of the
presidency under, 424, 425; refusal
to accept third' term, 427, 428;
death of, 502; indebtedness of Vir-

ginia to, 366.
" Jesuit Letters," 310.
Jews. Disqualification of, in Mary-
land, 390–392.
Judges. Impeachment of, in Ohio,

399, 400.
Judiciary, Power of, to declare acts un-

constitutional. Origin and growth
of, 394; case in Virginia, 1766, 394;
James Otis's declaration, 393; Jus-
tice Cushing's charge, 395; other
early assertions, 395; the New Jer-
sey precedent, Holmes 08. Walton,
395, 396; opinion of Virginia judges,
396, 397; Rutgers vs. Waddington,
397; Trevett vs. Weeden, 397, 399,
note; other early cases, 399; con-
flict in Ohio, 390, 400; in Georgia,
399, 400; discussed in Federal Con-
vention, 400; Federal Circuit Court's
opinions, 401, 402; decisions of Su-
preme Court, 402, note; State reso-
lutions, 402, 403; State acts de-
clared unconstitutional, 1809-'24,
412, note, 413, note; South Carolina
Negro Seamen Act, 417; denial of,
common, 418.
Judiciary, Jurisdiction of Federal.

Pennsylvania denies, Gideon Olm-
stead case, 403-406; Virginia denies,
Cohens 08. Virginia, 414; Kentucky
occupying claimant law, 415; bill to

restrict, 416.
Juvenile magazines, 275, note; the

Literary Miscellany, 278.
Kendall, Amos. On removal of
clerks, 528.

Kent, Chancellor. Favors property

qualifications, 385-386.
Kentucky. Stay laws, 162; decision
of Judge Clark, 162; Legislature at-
tacks Court of Appeals, 162-163;
new court created, 163; struggle be-
tween old and new courts, 163; tri-
umph of old court, 165-166.
Key, F. S., 301.
Kentucky resolutions. Boycotton
her produce, 257, 259, 262; cited by
Calhoun, 266; doctrine of the, 402,
403; occupying claimant laws, 414,
415; decision of Supreme Court,
415; opposition to Federal judiciary,
415, 416; Commonwealth Bank case,
416; attack on Federal courts. 416,
417; resolutions defending Clay,
511-513.
Kidnapping. Of free negroes, 215-

218; of William Morgan, 109-114.
King, Rufus, 468.
King's College. After the Revolu-

tion, 352; renamed Columbia, 353.
Knickerbocker “ History of New

York," 291, 292.
Knox, Henry, 465.
Kremer, George. Charge of bargain

and corruption, 78–79, 491-495.
Kugler, Dr. Gas machine, 126-127.
Ladies' magazines, early, 275, note.
" Ladies Bill," 105.
Lafitte, 7.
Lancaster, Joseph. Methods of teach.

ing, 355, 356; in Pennsylvania, 359.
Lancastrian method, 355, 356, 359,

360.
Land. Federal grant of, 364, 365.
Lands, Public, for educational pur-
poses. Ordinance of 1785 and 1787,
363; granted certain States, 363,
364; Maryland seeks Federal grant,
364, 365; action of Congress, 365;
States divided, 365.
Lands, The public. Credit system,
170-171; speculation in 171-172;
credit system abolished, 172–173;
Benton's Land Bill, 173; demands
of the Western States, 174-175.
Law. First law journal, 273.
Lawrence, Abbot. Delegate to Har-

risburg Convention, 250.
Laybach. Congress at, 39; circular,

39.
LeRoy. Antimasonic Convention, 118,

120.
Legal magazines. American Law

Journal, 273.
Leatherstocking Tales," The. Pop-

ularity of, 299, 300.
Legislature, Powers of State. In
early constitutions, 377, 378; limita-

tions upon, 380, 381.
Lehigh Coal Mining Company, 128.
Lehigh Navigation Company, 129.
Leiper, Thomas, 143, note.
Lewis, Governor Morgan. Message

on school fund, 354.
Lewiston, N. Y., 114, 115, 117.
Liberal Working-men's párty, 105.
Liberalism. In Austria, 33; in Na-
ples, 33; in Spain, 33-34; in Ger-
many, 34–35; in Spain, 37-38; in
Naples, 38–39; in Portugal, 39;
crushed in Naples, 40; and in

France, 43-44.
Lien. Demand for mechanics', 101, 105.

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Llen laws. Attempt to secure, 86.
Lincoln, Benjamin, 465.
Lincoln, Levi. On schools, 346.
Literature, American. British criti-
cism of, 329, 341; Everett's defence
of, 335, 336.
Literature. Lack of early, 268; age
of political writing, 268, 269; age
of magazines, 269; number and
character of, 269-271; the new
epoch, 272; medical journals, 272,
273; scientific journals, 273; legal
magazines, 273; theological and re-
ligious magazines, 273, 274, note;
theatrical magazines, 275, note;
ladies' magazines, 275, note; liter-
ary magazines, 276, 277; books for
young women, 277, 278; juveniles,
275, note, 278; political, 278-279;
French influence on, 279, 280; Eng-
lish books read, 280-283; Philadel-
phia a centre for, 281-283, notes;
new school of fiction, 283; diversity
of early writing, 284; pessimistic
view of American literature, 284,
285; optimistic view, 285, 286; Eng.
lish influence upon American, 288–
290; Irving's writings and influence,
291-293; Marshall's "Life of Wash-
ington, 293, 294, note; Franklin's
"Life and Writings," 293–297;
Cooper's novels, success at home
and abroad, 297-301; Cooper's liter-
ary contemporaries, 301; Bryant's
early verse, 301, 302; review of
American poetry, 302; compensa-
tion of authors, 303, 304; Sparks's
work, 301-306; Quarterly Review's
criticism, 315, 316, 323; Sydney
Smith's criticism, 318; Blackwood
Magazine criticism, 324, 325; Brit-

ish Review's comments, 325, 326.
Livingston, Edward, 475.
Locomotive. Model of a steam loco-

motive in Baltimore, 141; early
kinds, 146, 147.
London. Newspapers of, on Monroe

Doctrine, 48-50.
Long Island Sound. Steam naviga-

tion, 130.
Long, Major. Description of the

Northwest, 27, note.
Long, James. Leads an expedition

in Texas, 6; establishes a republic,
7; fate of the expedition, 7.
Longfellow, H. W. Early writings

ot, 301, 303.
Lotteries for schools. In New York,

353, 354; in Maryland, 363.
Lotteries. Forbidden by New York,

388.
Louisiana. Grant to, for schools, 364;
discussion over the admission of,

408-411.
Louisville, 166-167.
Lowndes, William. Named for Presl-

dent, 56.
Lundy, Benjamin. Sketch of, 209;
genius of universal emancipation,

209; meets Garrison, 210, 211.
Maclure, Willam. At New Harmony,

94.
Maclurla, 96.
McCullough v8. Maryland, 414.
McDuffie, George. Advocates prohibi-

tory tax on Northern goods, 258,
259; disunion speeches, 260, 261,

note; charges Clay with bargata
and corruption, 501.
McLane, Louis. Appointed Minister

to Great Britain, 555.
McLean, J. Postmaster-General, 520,

521; appointed judge, 527.
Macon's Report. British conduct of

the war, 310.
Madison, James. On European in-

tervention, 50-51; cited by Cal-
houn, 266.
Magazines. Age of, 269; number and

aistribution of early, 269; a typical
prospectus, 269, 270; character and
contents, 270, 271; titles of, 271;
the new epoch, 272; medical, 272,
273; scientífic, 273; legal, 273; theo-
logical and religious, 273, 274, note;
theatrical, 275, note; juvenile, 275,
note; musical, 275; ladies' journals,
275, note; the Port Folio, 276
the North American Review, 276,

277.
Magee, Lieutenant A. W. In Texas, 4.
Maine. Disputed boundary, 463-

476; resistance to northeast bound.
ary award, 473 476.
Mallory, Rollin C., Representative.
Member of Harrisburg Convention,
250; chairman of Committee on
Manufactures, 251.
Manufactures. Investments in, in
North and South in 1820, 229, 230;
variety of industries in North, 229,
230; capital and number of workers
in '1825, 230; committee on, in
House of Representatives, 1823,
1824, 231, 232; 1827, 251; report of
South Carolina, 252, 253; resolu-
tions of Georgia, 253; resolutions
of Alabama, 253, 254.
Manufacturers. Petitions of, for pro-

tective tariff, 232; competition of
British, 240, 241; meeting of New
England, in Boston, 1826, 241; com-
mittee of, visit Congress, 242.
Manumission Society of North Caro-

lina, 214.
Map, Mitchell's, 464, 471.
Marshall, John. "Life of Washing-

ton," 293, 294, note.
Marshall, John. Influence of, 412.
Mars Hill, 468-472.
Maryland. Status of free negro in,

185; wants more stringent fugi-
tive slave laws, 217; Delaware
and Pennsylvania comply, 218;
schools in, character of, 362; Bal-
timore religious and benevolent
schools, 362, 363; beginnings of pri.
mary system, 363; State seeks pub-
lic lands from Congress, 363, 364;
State legislation, 365, 366; dis-
qualifications of Jews, 390-391; op-
position of, to “ Conscript BINI,"
412.
Mason, George, 395.
Masonic orders. Rivalry in Mexico,

540, 541.
Masons. Kidnapping of Morgan, 109

112; trial of, 113-114; rise of anti-
masonic party, 112-120.
Massachusetts. Status of free negro

in, 196-197.
Massachusetts. Seat of woollen

manufactures, 241; vote of senators
of, on tariff, 1827, 242; the common-
school system of, 343-348; begin-

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nings of, 343, 344; later colonial
acts, 344; provision of constitution
of 1780 and act of 1789, 344, note,
345; school-houses, 343; school tax,
345; the district school, 345, 346; in-
troduction of text-books, 346; char-
acter of teachers, 346; grammar
schools decline, 346, 347; academies
founded, 347, note; faults of the
system, 347, 348; applies to Con-
gress for advice, 374; Constitu-
tional Convention, Webster on suf-
frage, 388–390; proposed amend-
ment limiting duration of embargo,
430, 431; opposition to suits against
States, 402; refusal to furnish mill-
tia, 407, 408; opposition to embargo,
411; calls Hartford Convention,
412; reply of, to Ohio's bank reso-
lutions, 414; protest against north-
east boundary award, 474.
Medical Museum. Founded, 272.
Medicine and Surgery, New England

Journal, 272, 273.
Medical Journals. Early number,
269; early Philadelphia, 272; new
journals, 272, note, 273.
Memorials to Congress. Protective

taritr, pro and con, 1824, 232, 233;
of New England woollen manufac-
turers, 1826, 241; Massachusetts,
increased protection to woollen
manufactures, 1826, 242; from varl-
ous bodies in South Carolina
against a protective tariff, 1827,
244, 245; Harrisburg Convention,
250, 251; Its memorial referred to
Committee on Manufactures, 251;
tariff memorials from Northern
States, 251; from Southern States,
251-254; from Ohio and New Jer-
sey, 254; various tariff and anti-
tariff, 254; protests of South Caro-
lina, Alabama, and Georgia, 267;
protest against jurisdiction of Fed-
eral courts, 415.
Message. Origin of the President's

annual, 424-425.
Methodist magazines, 272, 274, note;

Zion's Herald, 274.
Metternich. His reactionary work

in Naples, 33.
Mexico. Rebels against Spain, 3;
Hidalgo, 3, 4; Gutierres, 4; Toledo,
4; Moselos, 5; Aury, 5; fate of the
expedition, 6; Mina, 5-6; Long's
Texas expedition, 6–7; Austin seeks
a land grant, 7-8; rebels against
Spain, 9; Iturbide, the plan of Igua-
la, 9, 10; approved by O'Donojti, 10;
the treaty of Cordova, 10; First
Mexican Congress, 10; applicants
for Texas land grants, 10; Iturbide
proclaimed Emperor, 10; dismisses
Congress, 11; colonization law, 11;
Santa Anna rebels, 11; Iturbide ex-
pelled, 12; constitution formed, 12;
calls on the United States to en-
force Monroe Doctrine, 53-54; inter-
est in Panama Congress, 433, 434;
United States urges suspension of
expedition against Cuba, 438; in-
structions of our Minister, 439, 440;
fears French fleet, 439, 440; criti-
cism of Administration's policy
with, 445, 452, 453; boundary con-
troversy with, 459 463; refusal to
sell Texas, 460, 461; Jackson ad-

ministration futile attempt to re-
adjust boundary, 461-463; rival ma-
sonic parties in, and politics, 540,
541; insurrection in, 541, 542; Van
Buren opens negotiations with, for
Texas, 642, 543; request recall of
Poinsett, 549; Butler appointed
chargé d'affaires to Mexico, 549;
Van Buren's letter to, reviews hos-
tility to Mexico, 549-551; popular
opposition to sale of Texas in, 551,
552; Alaman, Mexican Secretary of
State, reviews policy of United
States, 552, 553; advises prompt
action in Texas, 553, 554; passes
law excluding citizens of United
States from Texas, 554, note.
Middle States. Industrial develop-

ment of, 230.
Middleton, Henry. Instructed as to

our claims to Oregon, 21-22; con-
cludes a convention, 22; instructed
to ask Russia to interpose in behalf
of Spanish colonies, 437-439.
Milledgeville on tariff, 259.
Miller, David C., 109; his connection

with Morgan, 109-110, 111.
Mills, Lack of. In South, 228; in
New England, 229; in Middle States,
230; increase in cotton and woollen,
after tariff act of 1824, 240.
Mina, Xavier, 5, 6.
Miner, Charles, Member of Congress.

Efforts to abolish slave-trade in
District of Columbia, 221–226.
Mineralogical Journal, American.

Founded, 273.
Mirror, The Thespian, 275.
Mississippi river. Navigation of, 166;

scenes on the river, 167-168.
Mitchell, Dr. Samuel L., 291.
Monroe Doctrine. Washington on
our European relations, 29; Jeffer.
son on, 30; Holy Alliance formed,
31-32; quadruple treaty, 32; liberal
movements in Europe, 32-35; Con-
gress of Alx, 35-36; revolt of Span-
Ish colonies, 35–36; Monroe on dan-
gers from, 36–37, note; rebellion
in Spain, 37-38; in Naples, 38-39; in
Portugal, 39; Congresses at Trop-
pau and 'Laybach, 39; the Laybach
circular, 39; liberalism crushed in
Naples, 40; United States recog-
nizes independence of South Amer-
ican Republics, 41-42; Congress
of Vienna and Verona, 43; France
invades Spain, 43-44; Canning's
proposal to Rush, 44; Gallatin's
letter to Chateaubriand, 44, note:
Monroe consults Jefferson, 45-46;
the doctrine announced, 46-48; re-
ception of, in England, 47-48;
Clay's resolution on, 51-52, instrnc-
tions to Poinsett, 53; Mexico calls
on the United States to enforce,
53-54; Hayne's interpretation of
the, 444; White's view of, 444, 445;
Adams's and Clay's views of, at-
tacked, 452-455; Buchanan's view
of, 456, 457; Webster's presenta-
tion of, 457-459.
Monroe, James. Inaugurated, 1;

makes Jackson Governor of Flor-
ida, 1; action regarding the slave-
trade, 16-18; Oregon message, 20;
on dangers from Europe, 36-37;
authorized to send Ministers to

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South American Republics, 41; rec-
ommends recognition, 42; Monroe
Doctrine, 44-54; on internal im-
provements, 148, 149; Indian policy,
178; message of, favoring protec-
tive tariff, 231.
Monro, Timothy. His body mistaken

for Morgan's, 117.
Moose Island, 466, 467.
Morelos. Leads rebels in Mexico, 5.
Morgan, William, 109; his book on
masonry, 109-110; kidnapped, 111-
112; excitement over it, 113, Gov-
ernor offers rewards, 113; trial
of the kidnappers, 113-114; Morgan
meetings, 114; charges against
Brant, 114; and Lieutenant-Gover-
nor of Upper Canada, 115; Antima-
sonic party formed, 115; appeal to
New York Legislature, 115-116;
Warsaw Convention, 116; body of
Timothy Monro mistaken for Mor-
gan's, 117; appeal to Congress, 118;
Legislature investigates, 119.
Morris, Gouverneur. Life and writ.

ings of, 306.
Moving day in New York, 122.
Mules. Boycotton Kentucky, 257,

259, 262.
Murphy, Archibald D. “Father of

the common schools," 367.
Murray's “ English Grammar," 284.
Music. Journal of, 275.
Naples, 33; revolution in, 35–36; the

Carbonari, 38; constitution granted,
39; Ferdinand called Laybach, 39-
40; Austria crushes liberal move-
ment in, 40.
Napoleon.' Action of the allies against,

32; returns from Elba, 00; the hun.

dred days' campaign, 34.
Nashoba. Founded, 97-98.
Nashville, 166.
Negro Seaman Act, 200-204; resolu-

tions of South Carolina, 417.
Negro schools. In Philadelphia, 359,

360, 361.
Negroes, Status of the free. Free

States, 184; In Delaware and Mary-
land and Tennessee, 185; in District
of Columbia, 186; in Virginia and
South Carolina, 186; in Ohio and In-
diana, 186-187; in illinois, 187-188;
the struggle for a pro-slavery Con-
stitution, 188-191; New Jersey, 192;
in New York, 192; work of the Col-
onization Society, 193-194; feeling
toward free negroes, 194-196; status
in Massachusetts, 196-197; debates
in New York Constitutional Con-
vention, 198-199; projected insur-
rection in South Carolina, 199-200;
Negro Seaman Act, 200-204; Ohio
on colonization, 204; Delaware on,
204; New Jersey, 204; Georgia on
the Colonization Society, 206,207;
South Carolina fugitive slave laws
and kidnapping, 215-219; in the Dis-

trict of Columbia, 219-222.
Netherlands, 13, 15.
New Brunswick. Province of,

formed, 466; Plaster of Paris Act,
484; trade with, 486.
New England. 'Industrial develop-

ment of, 229; effect of tariff act of
1824, 240, 241; depression of woollen
Industry, 1826, 241; meeting of

woollen manufacturers at Boston,
241; the tariff of 1828 accepted by,
255; resistance to “Force Act,
406, 407; refuses militia, 407, 408;
vote on admission of Louisiana,
411; resistance to embargo, 411; to

Conscript Bill," 411, 412.
New Hampshire. Applies to Con-
gress for advice, 374; reply of, to

Ohio's bank resolutions, 413.
New Harmony, Indiana, 90-96.
New Jersey. Resolution of, favor-

ing tariff, 254; schools in, 356, 357;
case of Holmes 08. Walton, 395,

396.
New Lanark. Owen's work at, 88–89.
New York city. Free Enquirer estab-

lished, 99, Working-men's Advo-
cate, 100; rise of labor party in,
99-101; platform of the party, 99-
100, 100-101; Russell Comstock,
101-102; the Working-men's ticket,
102-103; trade societies disa vow the
Free Enquirers, 103-104; The
Friend of Equal Rights and Daily
Sentinel established, 106; labor
ticket in, 107–108; population of
1825, 122; moving day, 122; new
buildings, 122, 123; duties collected,
packet lines, banks, 123; emigrants,
124; government, 124; street clean-
Ing, 124; fire department, 124-125;
night watch, 125; curious ordi
nances, 125-126; gas introduced,
127; anthracite coal, 128-130;
Schuylkill Company, 129-130; open-
ing of Erie Canal, 132-133; maga-
zines of, number, 269, 271; Society
for establishing a Free School,
354–356; case of Rutgers vs, Wad-
dington, 397; opposition to Federal
law, 417.
New York. On caucus nomination,
61, 65; Albany regency, 70, 71;
struggle in the Legislature over
manner of choosing electors, 1824,
70–73; Owenite communities, 96;
Free Enquirers and Working-men's
party, 99-104, 105-107; convention
at Salina, 107; Liberal Working.
men's Party Convention at Syra-
cuse, 108; Poor Man's party, 108;
the Morgan affair, 108-112; excite-
ment and trial of the kidnappers,
113-115; rise of Antimasonic party,
115-119; conventions at Utica and
LeRoy, 120; vote polled, 120; open-
ing of Erie Canal," 132-133; journey
to Buffalo by, 133-134; trade of
Erie Canal, 135-136; abolition of
slavery, 192; restricts free negro
voters, 198–199; tariff memorial of
Legislature, 251; no common school,
in colonial times, 352; Governor
Clinton's message, 352; the Board
of “Regents established, 352,
353; Columbia College arouses op-
position, 353; University of the
State of New York established, 353;
lotteries and other attempts to
raise a revenue, 353, 354; appeals
of Clinton and his successors, 354;
legislation, 354; a New York city so-
ciety incorporated, 354, 355; school-
district system, 356; struggle for
new constitution, 383-388; rights of
property 08. rights of man, 383,
385-388; Council of Appointment

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[graphic]

abolished, 384; Council of Rerision,
384, 386; views of Chancellor Kent,
385, 386; of Martin Van Buren, 387;
white suffrage, 388; negro suffrage,
388; white manhood suffrage, 332;
resolutions of, election of Presi-
dent, 510, 511; vote of, in election

of 1828, 517, 518.
Newspapers, Early labor. The Advo.

cate, 100-101; journals in the differ-
ent States, 105-106; Daily Sentinel,
106, 107; Friend of Equal Rights,

106.
Newspapers. French, in America,

280.
Niles, Hezekiah. Delegate to Har.

risburg Convention, 250.
Nobility, Titles of. Amendment pro-

posed by Congress, 431.
North. The. Industrial condition of,

1816-'20, 229, 230; division of inter-
ests of North and South, 242, 243,
244, 245, 246, 247, 248, 253, 254; po-
sition of, on tariff of 1828, 255; boy-
cott of, proposed, 256-259, 262.
North American Clay Working-men's

party, 108.
North American Review, The. Char-

acter of, 276-277; reply to British
criticism, 326, 331, 335–337, 339,

340.
North Carolina. Crawford's strength
in, 60, 68; in Pennsylvania, 69; re-
port of Legislative committee on
the tariff, 251, 252; schools in, char-
acter of, 366, 367; educational
movement for, 367, 368.
Northwest Ordinance. Political ideas

of, 378, 379.
Northwest Territory, Schools in. Dif-

ficulties of establishment, 369, 370;

universities and colleges, 370, 371.
Northwest, The, 20-27.
Novels read in early part of century,

280, 283-284.
Nullification. Proposed by * Sidney,"

261; resolutions proposed in South
Carolina Legislature, 263; " South
Carolina Exposition," 263-267; Ken-
tucky resolutions, 403; Massachu-
setts resists" Force Act," 406, 407;
Message of Governor Trumbull, of
Connecticut, 407: refusal of New
England States to furnish militia,
407, 408; resolutions of Massachu-
setts on embargo, 411; resolutions
of Maine and Massachusetts, 473-

476.
Oath. Masonic oath attacked, 119.
Oaths. Required of office holders,

390, note, 391, notes.
Occupying claimant laws, 414-416.
O'Donojú, Lieutenant-General Don

Juan, 10.
Office holders. Removal of, 521-536.
Ohio. Free negro in, 186; on coloni-

zation, 254; resolutions of, favoring
protection, 254; grant for
schools, 363, 364; schools in, pro-
visions of first constitution, 370;
difficulty of enforcement, 371; con-
flict between the Legislature and
the judiciary, 399, 400; State rights

resolutions of, 413.
Ohio river. Voyage down, 150-151.
Olmsted case, Gideon. Pennsylvania

and the Federal courts, 403-406;

proposed amendment suggested by,

430.
Ordinance of 1787, 378.
Ordinances. Curious, in New York,

125-126; in Philadelphia, 126.
Oregon. Prevost in, 18; Russians on

the Pacific coast, 18; occupation of,
discussed, 18-20, 21; the Russian
ukase, 20; the Alaskan boundary,
21-23; no use for Oregon, 23-27;
claims of United States and Great
Britain, 477-479; debate in Con-

gress over value of, 479-483.
Osborn, Charles, 209, 212.
Otis, James. Speech of, 395.
Otis, Samuel Allyne, 523.
Oven. The frontier' out-oven," 154.
Owen, Robert. At New Lanark, 88;

buys Harmony, 90; lectures on his
plan, 90-91; the preliminary so-
ciety, 92-93; community of equal-
ity, 93-94; condition of New Har-
mony, 94; dress reform at, 95; Dec-
laration of Mental Independence,
95; effects, 95-96; failure of New
Harmony, 96; Owenite communities
elsewhere, 96-97; with Miss Wright

founds Free Enquirer, 99.
Owen, Robert Dale, 99, 103-104, 107.
Owenite communities. New Har-

mony, 90-96; Macluria, Feiba Pe-
ven, 96; in other States, 96-97.
Packet lines from New York city,

124.
Painters' Society, New York City,

104.
Panama Congress. Early sugges-
tions of, 433; South American Min-
isters confer with Clay relative to,
434; the United States formally In-
vited to, 440; proposed programme,
440, 441; Adams's message and
nomination of envoys, 441, 442; op-
position to, in the Senate, 442-450;
question of debate in open session,
442, 443; partisan attempt to cen-
sure Adams, 442, 443; reasons for
opposition to, 443, 444; Hayne's
speech on the Monroe Doctrine,
444; White's views of the same and
its application, 444, 445; pro-slav-

interests aroused, 445-449;
Hayne's speech, 445447; White's
speech, 447; Berrien on danger of
the liberation of Cuba, 447, 448;
Benton on recognition of Hayti,
448, 449; nomination of envoys con-
firmed, 449, 450;_debate in the
House, 450-459; House calls for
papers, 450, 451; resolution on ex-
pediency of appropriating funds,
451; Webster's constitutional argu-
ment, 451, 457-459; Buchanan's
resolution, 451, 452; Administra-
tion's policy attacked, 452-456; obli-
gation of the House to make the
appropriation, 456, 457; Webster's
view of the Monroe Doctrine, 457-
458; appropriation bill passed, 459;

failure of the Congress, 459.
Pardoning power, 380.
Parley, Peter, 301.
Parties. Minor political parties. The

Free Enquirers. 99-106; Working-
men's party, 100-108; Antimasonic,

108-120.
Patterson, Justice, 401.

ery

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